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San Clemente Reservoir

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The water level at the San Clemente Reservoir will be reduced 10 feet by Friday because of concerns over its ability to withstand an earthquake. Holes were drilled into the concrete dam Monday to decrease pressure on the weakest parts of the dam, said David Gutierrez of the state Division of Safety of Dams. A 1992 division report says the San Clemente Reservoir could give way in an earthquake of magnitude 5.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The water level at the San Clemente Reservoir will be reduced 10 feet by Friday because of concerns over its ability to withstand an earthquake. Holes were drilled into the concrete dam Monday to decrease pressure on the weakest parts of the dam, said David Gutierrez of the state Division of Safety of Dams. A 1992 division report says the San Clemente Reservoir could give way in an earthquake of magnitude 5.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
She takes her sermon from meeting to meeting, preaching against the sin of water misuse, pleading for San Clemente to repent and conserve. "Water has finite limits," says former San Clemente Mayor Karoline Koester. "We don't have unlimited water." That point was driven home to San Clemente in July and August, as residents' thirst for water strongly outpaced supply, and the city's reservoir dwindled to unprecedented low levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1989 | ALLISON SAMUELS, Times Staff Writer
Joel Rodgers worries about his boxwood hedges and the garden that adorns his front yard. The city of San Clemente is urging residents to use less water, and he fears his shrubbery will suffer. "I used to water my shrubs twice a day," Rodgers said, "but I want to be a good citizen and abide by the rules, so my lawn is paying the price."
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monterey had been so dry that the Carmel River, the principal water source for the area, had not flowed to the sea in four years, and a strain of steelhead trout was endangered because the fish couldn't swim upstream. Now, after the torrential March rains, the river is coursing down the Santa Lucia Mountains so swiftly it has filled two reservoirs, advanced 10 miles in a month and is flowing into the ocean once again.
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