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San Diego Aerospace Museum

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NEWS
August 10, 1989
Walter Ballard, credited with piloting the plane that carried the nation's first load of transcontinental airmail in 1932, died Sunday at his home in La Mesa at 93. A devotee of fast cars and stunt flying in the embryonic days of both cars and planes, Ballard was a pilot for American Airways, now American Airlines, in 1932, when he flew the first hop--from San Diego's Lindbergh Field to Phoenix--of the first transcontinental mail delivery.
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TRAVEL
December 14, 2003 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
Loving an airline sounds about as likely as feeling a fondness for an insurance company. Air travel is too expensive and hassle-plagued to inspire emotional attachment. But that used to be different, as passengers who flew Pacific Southwest Airlines know. The San Diego-based carrier holds a special place in the hearts of many, especially those who flew PSA in the '60s and '70s, the glory days when the airline summed up everything that was groovy and freewheeling about California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard "Zeke" Cormier, fighter ace and war hero who led the Blue Angels and helped guide the world-famous San Diego Aerospace Museum, has died at the age of 81. Cormier died Feb. 23 of cancer at his home in Rancho Santa Fe near San Diego. In World War II, he shot down eight Japanese planes and probably two others, earning the double ace designation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard "Zeke" Cormier, fighter ace and war hero who led the Blue Angels and helped guide the world-famous San Diego Aerospace Museum, has died at the age of 81. Cormier died Feb. 23 of cancer at his home in Rancho Santa Fe near San Diego. In World War II, he shot down eight Japanese planes and probably two others, earning the double ace designation.
NEWS
February 3, 1995
Preston Fleet, founder of the Fotomat photo developing empire, pioneer of the giant screen Omnimax movie projection system and a philanthropist who gave San Diego two of its museums, has died at age 60. Fleet died of cancer Tuesday at a Santa Barbara hospital near his home in Santa Maria. Fleet, son of the founder of Convair, began his own business career 27 years ago with Fotomat, the drive-through film developing company with its distinctive kiosks.
TRAVEL
December 14, 2003 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
Loving an airline sounds about as likely as feeling a fondness for an insurance company. Air travel is too expensive and hassle-plagued to inspire emotional attachment. But that used to be different, as passengers who flew Pacific Southwest Airlines know. The San Diego-based carrier holds a special place in the hearts of many, especially those who flew PSA in the '60s and '70s, the glory days when the airline summed up everything that was groovy and freewheeling about California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1990 | G. Jeanette Avent, Times staff writer
La Jolla resident Ted Davie spent 33 years with the Navy, flying airplanes and commanding carriers. He had barely retired in 1970 when he received his calling to a second career. Davie, now 76, organized a storage room full of collectibles into a gleaming museum for San Diego Trust & Savings Bank downtown. As the bank's historian, he has also chronicled its 100-year history and now oversees much of the redesign and restoration of its branches. Davie was interviewed by Times staff writer G.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Klein is "the baby." He's 67. The other members of the 11-man crew are a little older--most of them veterans of military service during World War II. What binds them together is a love affair with airplanes, especially old airplanes.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The spirit and the money for Charles Lindbergh's historic flight from New York to Paris may have come from St. Louis, but the expertise and the steely determination to accomplish what many experts thought was impossible came from San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1988
Six San Diegans are featured in "Top Gun and Beyond," an episode of "Nova" detailing the evolution of fighter planes (8 p.m. today on Channel 15). The locals are Cmdr. Rick Ludwig of the Navy Fighter Weapon School at Miramar Naval Air Station; flying ace Cmdr. Randy Cunningham; former Cmdr. C. J. Heatley, author of "The Cutting Edge"; Howard Fisher, curator of the San Diego Aerospace Museum; World War I flying ace Bob Todd and Jim Stevenson, former editor of Miramar's Jet Journal.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The spirit and the money for Charles Lindbergh's historic flight from New York to Paris may have come from St. Louis, but the expertise and the steely determination to accomplish what many experts thought was impossible came from San Diego.
NEWS
February 3, 1995
Preston Fleet, founder of the Fotomat photo developing empire, pioneer of the giant screen Omnimax movie projection system and a philanthropist who gave San Diego two of its museums, has died at age 60. Fleet died of cancer Tuesday at a Santa Barbara hospital near his home in Santa Maria. Fleet, son of the founder of Convair, began his own business career 27 years ago with Fotomat, the drive-through film developing company with its distinctive kiosks.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Klein is "the baby." He's 67. The other members of the 11-man crew are a little older--most of them veterans of military service during World War II. What binds them together is a love affair with airplanes, especially old airplanes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1990 | G. Jeanette Avent, Times staff writer
La Jolla resident Ted Davie spent 33 years with the Navy, flying airplanes and commanding carriers. He had barely retired in 1970 when he received his calling to a second career. Davie, now 76, organized a storage room full of collectibles into a gleaming museum for San Diego Trust & Savings Bank downtown. As the bank's historian, he has also chronicled its 100-year history and now oversees much of the redesign and restoration of its branches. Davie was interviewed by Times staff writer G.
NEWS
August 10, 1989
Walter Ballard, credited with piloting the plane that carried the nation's first load of transcontinental airmail in 1932, died Sunday at his home in La Mesa at 93. A devotee of fast cars and stunt flying in the embryonic days of both cars and planes, Ballard was a pilot for American Airways, now American Airlines, in 1932, when he flew the first hop--from San Diego's Lindbergh Field to Phoenix--of the first transcontinental mail delivery.
NEWS
May 21, 1995
Vice Adm. Paul D. Stroop, 90, the retired Navy vice admiral who commanded the Pacific Fleet for three years during the 1960s. Stroop, a 39-year Navy veteran, retired from the Navy in 1965 and worked until three years ago as a consultant to Ryan Aeronautical and Teledyne of San Diego. Stroop was chief of the Bureau of Weapons in Washington when he was selected in 1962 for promotion to vice admiral and assigned as commander of the Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet at North Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1988
Car buffs and their clans are invited to the San Diego Automotive Museum this weekend for a free open house, featuring refreshments, conversation with fellow car buffs and "a large slice of automotive history," according to Barnaby Brokaw, a member of the museum's board of directors. More than 30 cars will be on display, including a rare 1894 Peugeot, a 1920s Kissel, a 1947 Rolls-Royce convertible, and vintage Porsches, Mercedes, Ferraris and Jaguars.
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