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NEWS
September 3, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Three years ago in an alfalfa field somewhere in San Diego, a biotechnology company quietly began an experiment that, it now appears, came perilously close to violating federal rules that regulate the release of genetically engineered bacteria into the environment.
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NEWS
September 28, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The briefing at the San Diego Fire Department last week turned from the routine to the unthinkable: Africanized honeybees. Killer bees. Even these hardened veterans of crisis and fear could not contain their anxiety. "Jesus Christ," one old-timer muttered as he contemplated the kinds of rescue missions his fellow workers may be called to perform, tactics not found in training manuals. Fire Capt.
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NEWS
September 28, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The briefing at the San Diego Fire Department last week turned from the routine to the unthinkable: Africanized honeybees. Killer bees. Even these hardened veterans of crisis and fear could not contain their anxiety. "Jesus Christ," one old-timer muttered as he contemplated the kinds of rescue missions his fellow workers may be called to perform, tactics not found in training manuals. Fire Capt.
NEWS
September 3, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Three years ago in an alfalfa field somewhere in San Diego, a biotechnology company quietly began an experiment that, it now appears, came perilously close to violating federal rules that regulate the release of genetically engineered bacteria into the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1985
San Diego County agriculture officials said Tuesday that it will be six months before they know for certain whether the Queensland fruit fly found in the La Mesa area last week represents an isolated case--or a danger to all of California's vegetable and citrus crops. County Agriculture Commissioner Kathleen Thuner said federal and state officials last week set up 225 fruit fly traps in addition to the more than 2,000 that are normally positioned throughout the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1985 | SEBASTIAN DORTCH, Times Staff Writer
A housefly-sized insect from the South Pacific capable of damaging more than 100 types of fruits and vegetables has been found in San Diego County. San Diego County agriculture officials said that it will be six months before they know for certain whether the insect, known as the Queensland fruit fly, represents an isolated case or possibly a danger to all of California's vegetable and citrus crops. A single fly was found in the La Mesa area last week.
NEWS
August 27, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
A male Mediterranean fruit fly was trapped Monday in Coronado, prompting San Diego County agriculture officials to blanket most of the island with sex-lure traps. Assistant Agriculture Commissioner Ray Rinder said the destructive pest was found on the west side of the island in a trap placed on a Philippine orange tree. Rinder said that because single trappings are not unusual, county officials are not strongly concerned about the find.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1986
A male Mediterranean fruit fly was trapped Monday in Coronado, prompting San Diego County agriculture officials to blanket most of the island with sex-lure traps. Assistant Agriculture Commissioner Ray Rinder said the destructive pest was found on the west side of the island in a trap placed on a Philippine orange tree. Rinder said that because single trappings are not unusual, county officials are not overly concerned about the find.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1987 | TINA CRAVAT, Times Staff Writer
An unusually cold Arctic air mass with the potential to cause widespread frost damage to San Diego crops is expected to start blowing into the county Saturday night, forecasters said. A weak Santa Ana condition that bathed San Diegans with sunshine and warmer temperatures the past few days will dissipate today, according to Wilbur Shigehara, a National Weather Service forecaster.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2008 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
A tiny insect capable of carrying a disease that could devastate California's $1.2-billion citrus industry has been found in a lemon tree in San Diego, state agriculture officials said Friday. The identification of the bug as an Asian citrus psyllid in San Diego is preliminary, pending confirmation at a U.S. Department of Agriculture lab in Washington, officials said. The Asian citrus psyllid has become the primary carrier of citrus greening disease in Florida, where it has killed thousands of acres of orange groves, endangering that state's ranking as the largest U.S. producer of orange juice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1988 | NANCY RAY, Times Staff Writer
San Diego Gas & Electric Co. issued a cold-weather alert Wednesday, predicting that the cold snap gripping the county will greatly increase natural gas use over what is considered normal for this time of the year. Utility spokesman Fred Vaughn said SDG & E expects natural-gas use to rise to 300 million cubic feet a day--50 million cubic feet more than a normal December. Shortages are not expected, however, because the utility has about 100 million cubic feet in daily reserve, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1990 | JOHN D. CRAMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lake Cuyamaca has been treated with a herbicide to reduce the weed responsible for killing hundreds of rainbow trout in the past month. No new trout will be stocked in the lake until the water's alkaline level--raised unusually high by uncontrolled growth of the sago pond weed--is reduced, said Hugh Marx, general manager of the Lake Cuyamaca Recreation and Park District, which regulates recreation at the reservoir.
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