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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
The Museum of Photographic Arts will present an exhibition of 39 contemporary Soviet photographers and the San Diego Repertory Theatre will stage the U.S. premiere of a contemporary Soviet play as part of the San Diego Arts Festival "Treasures of the Soviet Union," officials announced Tuesday. Parisian gallery director Marie-Francoise George was curator of the exhibit of 120 photographs, titled "An Insight into Contemporary Soviet Photography." It includes a catalogue. Museum of Photographic Arts director Arthur Ollman chose the exhibit after seeing it in France.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1996 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Ever since multiculturalism came into vogue in the late 1980s, more and more artists have been making works about their ethnic heritages. Such a task can be either liberating or limiting--as choreographer John Malashock and composer Yale Strom recently discovered. Asked by the three-year-old San Diego Jewish Festival to create a new dance, Malashock enlisted Strom, and the two artists found themselves walking a narrow line in trying to make a "Jewish" work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Organizers of the Soviet arts festival announced Tuesday the inclusion of a movie festival and symposium featuring four Georgian film directors, the addition of three more eggs to the exhibit of Faberge eggs, and the creation of extensive festival-related educational programs for children. Arrangements were also solidified for the B St.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1989 | GERARD GARZA and MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Well, it's over. San Diego's first international arts festival--Treasures of the Soviet Union--officially came to a close Sunday. Did the event, as mayor and festival founder Maureen O'Connor predicted, enhance the city's "public image as a player on the international arts scene"? Did it transform San Diego, as she anticipated, "from an also-ran city to a cultural power"? Did the festival, as she hoped, get the attention of the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1989
The following are "unofficial" Soviet arts festival events and exhibitions. They were inspired, but not sanctioned, by the festival. -"Fabulous Egg Salad," through Nov. 2, Tohubohu Gallery. This exhibition was designed as a spoof on the Faberge eggs and features eggs inspired by Mayor Maureen O'Connor and Steve Garvey. -Freedom Arts Festival, through Nov. 15, Symphony Towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1989 | GERARD GARZA
They said it couldn't be done. Some said it shouldn't be done. But Saturday, San Diego opens "Treasures of the Soviet Union," a three-week arts festival that organizers hope will put the city on the cultural map. The San Diego Arts Festival is largely the brainchild of Mayor Maureen O'Connor, who dreamed up the event while in Scotland for the 1987 Edinburgh Festival. Though organized by a nonprofit corporation, the festival is clearly a city-sponsored event.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
"Yescho , yescho , yescho!" insists Soviet director Roman Viktyuk, spinning his arm as he stares intently at John David Bland, who is twirling Jon Matthews around in a wheelchair. "More, more, more!" Susan Larson swiftly translates at Viktyuk's side.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | LEAH OLLMAN
The San Diego Arts Festival: Treasures of the Soviet Union, which begins today, has its official and its unofficial events--those sponsored by the city, and those organized and funded independently. Until recently, most art of the Soviet Union divided itself along similar lines, with members of the Artists Union producing official art, supported by the government, and all other artists' work considered unofficial. The categories were never hard and fast, and now glasnost and perestroika are rendering them obsolete.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1989
Last week's bloody riots in Soviet Georgia so far pose no threat to the "San Diego Arts Festival: Treasures of the Soviet Union," according to Paul Downey, spokesman for Mayor Maureen O'Connor. The October-November festival is built chiefly around the culture of the Soviet state of Georgia. At least 19 died during last week's rioting, triggered by Georgian nationalists who have complained that the Soviet government is dominated by people of Russian descent. Festival organizers were assured last week by officials at the Soviet Embassy in Washington that "there is no point of concern for the festival," Downey said.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Political strife in the Soviet Union has caused cancellation of one of the more highly touted events of San Diego's Soviet arts festival.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Political strife in the Soviet Union has caused cancellation of one of the more highly touted events of San Diego's Soviet arts festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"How shall we live?" A familiar question in Russian drama, from Chekhov on. But the villagers portrayed in the Maly Theatre of Leningrad's "Brothers and Sisters" are not debating it over the tea-table. Five years after the defeat of the Nazis, these people are still feeding their children "bread" made of moss and sawdust. How shall we live? The surprise of this two-part, six-hour saga at the Old Globe Theatre, a centerpiece of San Diego's Soviet arts festival, is that it's not more of an ordeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
The three-week San Diego Arts Festival, "Treasures of the Soviet Union," which boasts the most extensive lineup of Soviet art and culture ever assembled in the United States, gets under way today. The festival features several major art exhibitions, including: -The largest collection of Faberge imperial eggs ever assembled for public viewing at the San Diego Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | LEAH OLLMAN
The San Diego Arts Festival: Treasures of the Soviet Union, which begins today, has its official and its unofficial events--those sponsored by the city, and those organized and funded independently. Until recently, most art of the Soviet Union divided itself along similar lines, with members of the Artists Union producing official art, supported by the government, and all other artists' work considered unofficial. The categories were never hard and fast, and now glasnost and perestroika are rendering them obsolete.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
"Yescho , yescho , yescho!" insists Soviet director Roman Viktyuk, spinning his arm as he stares intently at John David Bland, who is twirling Jon Matthews around in a wheelchair. "More, more, more!" Susan Larson swiftly translates at Viktyuk's side.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1989
The following are "unofficial" Soviet arts festival events and exhibitions. They were inspired, but not sanctioned, by the festival. -"Fabulous Egg Salad," through Nov. 2, Tohubohu Gallery. This exhibition was designed as a spoof on the Faberge eggs and features eggs inspired by Mayor Maureen O'Connor and Steve Garvey. -Freedom Arts Festival, through Nov. 15, Symphony Towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
Proposals for an alternative Freedom Arts Festival, a spinoff of the upcoming San Diego Arts Festival: "Treasures of the Soviet Union," will be solicited next week, city officials said Friday. In response to critics of the Soviet arts festival, scheduled for three weeks in October and November, the City Council last September earmarked $30,000 for a "freedom festival." At that time, the council members talked of devoting such a festival to "victims" of the Soviet Union, such as Vietnamese, Afghani and Nicaraguan refugees.
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