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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego City Council's mad dash on Thursday night to balance the upcoming budget seemed to leave most council members and City Hall observers convinced that there has to be a better, or at least less painful, way to get the job done. For many, the light at the end of the budgeting tunnel seems to be a long-range business plan that would place limits on the seemingly never-ending attempt to make scarce revenue keep pace with an ever-increasing list of proposed expenditures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992
If I were a SDSU sociology professor, I too would be upset over being laid off. In what other profession can one get paid a very comfortable salary for working (teaching) 12-15 hours per week and spending the remainder of your time contemplating world problems? In addition, if those professors don't feel like teaching for a day, or administering or grading tests, they can get a student to handle the chore. What a job! Sure beats working for a living. RICHARD D. SARETSKY, Walnut
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1986
A proposed $25,000 memorial to the people killed in the San Ysidro massacre in 1984 was pulled out of the proposed 1987 City of San Diego budget Monday. The memorial was proposed by City Manager Sylvester Murray for the site where gunman James Huberty walked into a McDonald's restaurant and killed 21 people before he was shot to death by police. Murray also proposed a $75,000 parking lot be built on the site.
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that vanishing revenues have "taken us past the point of taking meat off the bones, we're now taking bones off the body," the city manager announced a broad range of spending cuts Friday that include asking city employees to take time off without pay. City Manager Jack McGrory said about 4,000 city employees have been asked to take up to 26 days of leave without pay during this fiscal year because of a projected revenue shortfall of $16.
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that vanishing revenues have "taken us past the point of taking meat off the bones, we're now taking bones off the body," the city manager announced a broad range of spending cuts Friday that include asking city employees to take time off without pay. City Manager Jack McGrory said about 4,000 city employees have been asked to take up to 26 days of leave without pay during this fiscal year because of a projected revenue shortfall of $16.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1987
The San Diego City Council on Tuesday approved a $716-million budget for 1987-1988, up $77 million from the previous year. Despite the increase, city officials say the budget is a "bare-bones" approach to municipal business, and that many of the council's pet projects--such as beefing up the police force--had to be put on hold so other services would remain at the same level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1986 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Putting more police officers on the streets and taking a firmer grip on urban growth emerged as the dominant themes Thursday in the City of San Diego's $644-million budget for 1987. Council members, wrapping up weeks of tedious budget hearings, approved a budget that will go into effect July 1 and add millions of dollars to the city's police and planning departments. The budget will add 99 police officers by next summer, including larger teams to help curb street gang violence and drug traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992
If I were a SDSU sociology professor, I too would be upset over being laid off. In what other profession can one get paid a very comfortable salary for working (teaching) 12-15 hours per week and spending the remainder of your time contemplating world problems? In addition, if those professors don't feel like teaching for a day, or administering or grading tests, they can get a student to handle the chore. What a job! Sure beats working for a living. RICHARD D. SARETSKY, Walnut
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1989 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it tree triage. Faced with a shrinking budget that pays to service only about an eighth of San Diego's city-owned trees, park officials acknowledge that they are setting priorities. "Each day becomes kind of a Russian roulette--you say, 'Which are the worst of the worst?' " said Karl Schnizler, who is in charge of tree maintenance for San Diego's Park and Recreation Department. Ideally, he said, "we do certain types of tree trimming for the health and proper growth of the tree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although San Diego could lose three submarines and one nuclear-powered cruiser under the Pentagon's new fiscal blueprint announced Monday, Navy officials said the city's military would otherwise remain relatively untouched by the budget that threatens to shut bases and mothball 23 vessels. "To me, it says that San Diego is so darn important that precious little was touched," said Rear Adm. John W. Adams, commander of San Diego Naval Base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego City Council's mad dash on Thursday night to balance the upcoming budget seemed to leave most council members and City Hall observers convinced that there has to be a better, or at least less painful, way to get the job done. For many, the light at the end of the budgeting tunnel seems to be a long-range business plan that would place limits on the seemingly never-ending attempt to make scarce revenue keep pace with an ever-increasing list of proposed expenditures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although San Diego could lose three submarines and one nuclear-powered cruiser under the Pentagon's new fiscal blueprint announced Monday, Navy officials said the city's military would otherwise remain relatively untouched by the budget that threatens to shut bases and mothball 23 vessels. "To me, it says that San Diego is so darn important that precious little was touched," said Rear Adm. John W. Adams, commander of San Diego Naval Base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1989 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it tree triage. Faced with a shrinking budget that pays to service only about an eighth of San Diego's city-owned trees, park officials acknowledge that they are setting priorities. "Each day becomes kind of a Russian roulette--you say, 'Which are the worst of the worst?' " said Karl Schnizler, who is in charge of tree maintenance for San Diego's Park and Recreation Department. Ideally, he said, "we do certain types of tree trimming for the health and proper growth of the tree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1987
The San Diego City Council on Tuesday approved a $716-million budget for 1987-1988, up $77 million from the previous year. Despite the increase, city officials say the budget is a "bare-bones" approach to municipal business, and that many of the council's pet projects--such as beefing up the police force--had to be put on hold so other services would remain at the same level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1986 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Putting more police officers on the streets and taking a firmer grip on urban growth emerged as the dominant themes Thursday in the City of San Diego's $644-million budget for 1987. Council members, wrapping up weeks of tedious budget hearings, approved a budget that will go into effect July 1 and add millions of dollars to the city's police and planning departments. The budget will add 99 police officers by next summer, including larger teams to help curb street gang violence and drug traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1986
A proposed $25,000 memorial to the people killed in the San Ysidro massacre in 1984 was pulled out of the proposed 1987 City of San Diego budget Monday. The memorial was proposed by City Manager Sylvester Murray for the site where gunman James Huberty walked into a McDonald's restaurant and killed 21 people before he was shot to death by police. Murray also proposed a $75,000 parking lot be built on the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1992
The city of San Diego's budget crunch has not yet reduced it to scraping for pennies, but it will begin eagerly pocketing extra quarters as a result of a 25-cent-an-hour increase in parking meter rates approved by the City Council. By a 7-2 vote, the council raised parking rates from the current 75 cents per hour to $1, a move estimated to increase parking revenue by about $770,000 annually, to $4.2 million.
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