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SPORTS
September 23, 1998 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bumper sticker read, "Stadium? Already got one. Need a library." Talk about a sign of the times for San Diego. This should be the best of times for the San Diego Padres. Not only have they dug themselves out from under the rubble left by the Tom Werner regime; not only do they have the best record in the National League West; not only are they heading into the final days of the regular season with a shot at the best record in the league . . .
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SPORTS
September 23, 1998 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bumper sticker read, "Stadium? Already got one. Need a library." Talk about a sign of the times for San Diego. This should be the best of times for the San Diego Padres. Not only have they dug themselves out from under the rubble left by the Tom Werner regime; not only do they have the best record in the National League West; not only are they heading into the final days of the regular season with a shot at the best record in the league . . .
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NEWS
October 12, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's talk sports. In fact, let's talk and talk and litigate and hold an election and maybe litigate and talk some more. The roadshow that has toured a string of American cities in recent years has settled into San Diego for a lengthy run. The plot poses a question capable of provoking debate in any barbershop or on any radio talk show across the land: Should the public coffers be raided to provide a venue for a privately run, for-profit sports franchise to display its wares?
BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Super Bowl games have turned out to be yawners for spectators, but another kind of scrimmage--hard-fought and often more entertaining--usually erupts after the final whistle, when Monday-morning economists go head to head over the spectacle's dollar benefits, the public expense incurred and whether the host city got its money's worth. Super Bowl XXXII, to be played Sunday in San Diego, is no different, and the opposing camps have already formed.
SPORTS
September 19, 1997 | J.A. ADANDE
Tony Gwynn is among the best at what he does. He's happy and he's paid millions of dollars for a job that lets him spend the bulk of the time standing outside in the best climate in the country. So why should we feel sorry for him? He warrants our sympathy because when you do your job well, when you treat others with respect, you deserve the best your world can give back to you. Tony Gwynn deserves a championship. Or at least a legitimate shot at one. Another season is drawing to a close.
SPORTS
August 28, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Two of the America's Cup boats are missing from San Diego. In a move shrouded in secrecy, Bill Koch's America-3 defense syndicate has temporarily shifted operations from San Diego to San Pedro, which has something San Diego hasn't had lately: wind. Two boats--the older Jayhawk, with sail number USA 9, and Defiant, USA 18--will be based in San Pedro and sailing off Cabrillo Beach and Pt. Fermin for an indefinite period.
SPORTS
January 31, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
When a proposal was made that the San Diego Opera display Super Bowl score updates in the lobby during intermissions of last Sunday's matinee, the company's director, Ian Campbell, who is Australian, understood the request, even though he added, "I'm not particularly excited by pituitary cases chasing a pig's bladder." Professional football--the Super Bowl first and foremost--is the pig's bladder du jour in San Diego, which has a commitment to be the host city for Super Bowl XXXII on Jan.
SPORTS
January 27, 1988 | Mike Downey
San Diego. Gateway to Ensenada. City of the big sailors. Butcher of infield grounders. Metropolitan area where La Jolla is pronounced as if a Frenchman were discussing a Georgetown basketball player. Home of Shamu, who is a whale, not a soccer player. Home of the America's Cup. Home of Super Bowl XXII. Los Angeles Jr. San Diego is the city with the woman from the zoo who brings ocelots and wombats and marmosets and baby yaks that leave fur balls and go potty on Johnny Carson's lapels.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Super Bowl games have turned out to be yawners for spectators, but another kind of scrimmage--hard-fought and often more entertaining--usually erupts after the final whistle, when Monday-morning economists go head to head over the spectacle's dollar benefits, the public expense incurred and whether the host city got its money's worth. Super Bowl XXXII, to be played Sunday in San Diego, is no different, and the opposing camps have already formed.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's talk sports. In fact, let's talk and talk and litigate and hold an election and maybe litigate and talk some more. The roadshow that has toured a string of American cities in recent years has settled into San Diego for a lengthy run. The plot poses a question capable of provoking debate in any barbershop or on any radio talk show across the land: Should the public coffers be raided to provide a venue for a privately run, for-profit sports franchise to display its wares?
SPORTS
September 19, 1997 | J.A. ADANDE
Tony Gwynn is among the best at what he does. He's happy and he's paid millions of dollars for a job that lets him spend the bulk of the time standing outside in the best climate in the country. So why should we feel sorry for him? He warrants our sympathy because when you do your job well, when you treat others with respect, you deserve the best your world can give back to you. Tony Gwynn deserves a championship. Or at least a legitimate shot at one. Another season is drawing to a close.
SPORTS
January 31, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
When a proposal was made that the San Diego Opera display Super Bowl score updates in the lobby during intermissions of last Sunday's matinee, the company's director, Ian Campbell, who is Australian, understood the request, even though he added, "I'm not particularly excited by pituitary cases chasing a pig's bladder." Professional football--the Super Bowl first and foremost--is the pig's bladder du jour in San Diego, which has a commitment to be the host city for Super Bowl XXXII on Jan.
SPORTS
July 18, 1996 | DANA HADDAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Neely's first impression of the World Over-The-Line Championships was typical any sports fan who likes the beer commercials as much as the games themselves. "The first time I saw this event, it was too good to be true," Neely said. "The athleticism and the debauchery. It's mammoth and incredible." Players and spectators come from all over the United States to attend this over-the-line (or OTL) event.
SPORTS
July 14, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Gwynn stood in the National League clubhouse Monday and closed his eyes, his face reflecting an odd mixture of anguish and appreciation. This is Gwynn's eighth All-Star game, and the San Diego Padre right fielder has never seen anything like it. The game at 5:30 p.m. today at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium is being called the 63rd All-Star game, but it really is nothing more than a pickup game in the ol' Padre neighborhood.
SPORTS
August 28, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Two of the America's Cup boats are missing from San Diego. In a move shrouded in secrecy, Bill Koch's America-3 defense syndicate has temporarily shifted operations from San Diego to San Pedro, which has something San Diego hasn't had lately: wind. Two boats--the older Jayhawk, with sail number USA 9, and Defiant, USA 18--will be based in San Pedro and sailing off Cabrillo Beach and Pt. Fermin for an indefinite period.
SPORTS
July 14, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tony Gwynn stood in the National League clubhouse Monday and closed his eyes, his face reflecting an odd mixture of anguish and appreciation. This is Gwynn's eighth All-Star game, and the San Diego Padre right fielder has never seen anything like it. The game at 5:30 p.m. today at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium is being called the 63rd All-Star game, but it really is nothing more than a pickup game in the ol' Padre neighborhood.
SPORTS
July 18, 1996 | DANA HADDAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Neely's first impression of the World Over-The-Line Championships was typical any sports fan who likes the beer commercials as much as the games themselves. "The first time I saw this event, it was too good to be true," Neely said. "The athleticism and the debauchery. It's mammoth and incredible." Players and spectators come from all over the United States to attend this over-the-line (or OTL) event.
SPORTS
January 27, 1988 | Mike Downey
San Diego. Gateway to Ensenada. City of the big sailors. Butcher of infield grounders. Metropolitan area where La Jolla is pronounced as if a Frenchman were discussing a Georgetown basketball player. Home of Shamu, who is a whale, not a soccer player. Home of the America's Cup. Home of Super Bowl XXII. Los Angeles Jr. San Diego is the city with the woman from the zoo who brings ocelots and wombats and marmosets and baby yaks that leave fur balls and go potty on Johnny Carson's lapels.
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