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SPORTS
September 23, 1998 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bumper sticker read, "Stadium? Already got one. Need a library." Talk about a sign of the times for San Diego. This should be the best of times for the San Diego Padres. Not only have they dug themselves out from under the rubble left by the Tom Werner regime; not only do they have the best record in the National League West; not only are they heading into the final days of the regular season with a shot at the best record in the league . . .
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SPORTS
September 23, 1998 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bumper sticker read, "Stadium? Already got one. Need a library." Talk about a sign of the times for San Diego. This should be the best of times for the San Diego Padres. Not only have they dug themselves out from under the rubble left by the Tom Werner regime; not only do they have the best record in the National League West; not only are they heading into the final days of the regular season with a shot at the best record in the league . . .
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NEWS
October 12, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's talk sports. In fact, let's talk and talk and litigate and hold an election and maybe litigate and talk some more. The roadshow that has toured a string of American cities in recent years has settled into San Diego for a lengthy run. The plot poses a question capable of provoking debate in any barbershop or on any radio talk show across the land: Should the public coffers be raided to provide a venue for a privately run, for-profit sports franchise to display its wares?
BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Super Bowl games have turned out to be yawners for spectators, but another kind of scrimmage--hard-fought and often more entertaining--usually erupts after the final whistle, when Monday-morning economists go head to head over the spectacle's dollar benefits, the public expense incurred and whether the host city got its money's worth. Super Bowl XXXII, to be played Sunday in San Diego, is no different, and the opposing camps have already formed.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most Super Bowl games have turned out to be yawners for spectators, but another kind of scrimmage--hard-fought and often more entertaining--usually erupts after the final whistle, when Monday-morning economists go head to head over the spectacle's dollar benefits, the public expense incurred and whether the host city got its money's worth. Super Bowl XXXII, to be played Sunday in San Diego, is no different, and the opposing camps have already formed.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's talk sports. In fact, let's talk and talk and litigate and hold an election and maybe litigate and talk some more. The roadshow that has toured a string of American cities in recent years has settled into San Diego for a lengthy run. The plot poses a question capable of provoking debate in any barbershop or on any radio talk show across the land: Should the public coffers be raided to provide a venue for a privately run, for-profit sports franchise to display its wares?
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