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June 6, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the beginning there was light and it was white light and people were happy. But as the homes, shops and mini-malls multiplied, the white light spread heavenward and soon the learned astronomers from Caltech and San Diego State said they were being night-blinded by "sky glow." So the City Council, to protect the interests of science and maybe save some money, decreed a decade ago that San Diego street lights would use bulbs emitting a yellow-orange light.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sale and possession of a common aquarium algae will be banned in San Diego under a measure adopted by city officials Monday. The City Council voted unanimously in favor of an ordinance that will levy a $250 fine against anyone caught selling or possessing Caulerpa taxifolia. The fast-growing plant, which displaces native sea grasses that provide nutrition to sea life, was discovered last year in the Agua Hedionda Lagoon in Carlsbad.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sale and possession of a common aquarium algae will be banned in San Diego under a measure adopted by city officials Monday. The City Council voted unanimously in favor of an ordinance that will levy a $250 fine against anyone caught selling or possessing Caulerpa taxifolia. The fast-growing plant, which displaces native sea grasses that provide nutrition to sea life, was discovered last year in the Agua Hedionda Lagoon in Carlsbad.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the beginning there was light and it was white light and people were happy. But as the homes, shops and mini-malls multiplied, the white light spread heavenward and soon the learned astronomers from Caltech and San Diego State said they were being night-blinded by "sky glow." So the City Council, to protect the interests of science and maybe save some money, decreed a decade ago that San Diego street lights would use bulbs emitting a yellow-orange light.
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