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San Diego County Air Pollution Control District

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NEWS
February 17, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
When residents of San Diego County found themselves under siege from heavy smog 55 days last year, they had more than themselves to blame. A report released this week by the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District blamed smog blown down from Los Angeles for three out of every four days that San Diego exceeded the federal clean air standard for ozone, a health-threatening air pollutant.
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NEWS
February 17, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
When residents of San Diego County found themselves under siege from heavy smog 55 days last year, they had more than themselves to blame. A report released this week by the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District blamed smog blown down from Los Angeles for three out of every four days that San Diego exceeded the federal clean air standard for ozone, a health-threatening air pollutant.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego is installing nine electric-vehicle chargers in its downtown area, making it the largest urban area in the nation to be "EV-ready," according to a San Diego booster group. "Downtown San Diego is thinking of the future, when no single fuel will dominate the vehicle of the driving public," said Craig Irving, chairman of the Downtown San Diego Partnership.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gentlemen, Start Your Wrecking Crane: The first of 1,000 pre-1982 cars that the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District is buying back in a bid to reduce smog will be flattened today at a wrecking yard in San Diego. The car, a 1980 Ford Pinto, will be flattened to 18 inches high and sold as scrap to a state-licensed dismantler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1990
A $2 fee will be tacked on to each vehicle registration bill, starting in April, to pay for the cost of a countywide program to reduce smog, San Diego County Air Pollution Control District directors voted Tuesday. The APCD action will yield $500,000 through June, 1991, and about $3.4 million annually, which will go into the creation of a traffic-control program aimed at reducing vehicle mileage in the county and into enforcement of pollution regulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1987
A La Mesa company that manufactures two highly toxic gases can continue to operate until a Sept. 10 hearing before the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District's board, the district's chief said Monday. Richard Sommerville said a court injunction issued in February prohibits him from closing down Phoenix Research Corp. until the district's hearing board reaches a formal decision on the company's fate. Last week, Phoenix Research lost a bid to obtain an operating permit from the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1987
The San Diego County Air Pollution Control District's board of directors said Thursday it will make a decision Aug. 13 on an appeal by Phoenix Research Corp., a manufacturer of toxic gases that has been denied operating permits by the district. The firm, owned by Union Carbide Corp., produces arsine and phosphine, each of which are capable of killing a person within minutes of exposure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1987
The San Marcos City Council has delayed a vote on a proposed trash-to-energy plant for 30 days to allow time for an updated risk assessment of the facility to be reviewed. By putting off a decision Monday, the council is giving officials with the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District and other agencies a chance to go over the new risk study, which is part of an environmental review of the $217-million project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1985
An Oceanside firm found responsible for a toxic gas leak that injured five people was cited Friday by the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District. Allen Danzig, chief of enforcement for the control district, said that, based on his investigation of the Wednesday incident involving the J.C. Schumacher Co., the district issued a notice of violation of the California Health and Safety Code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1988
In 1985, the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District first learned that the Phoenix Corp. in La Mesa had been manufacturing deadly gases used in the electronics industry without a valid permit for more than 10 years. The discovery was made thanks to investigations by the Environmental Health Coalition. Public disclosure first came in an article in San Diego Magazine followed by several articles in the Los Angeles Times. According to a recent Times article ("Beleaguered Maker of Deadly Gases to Quit La Mesa for Secret Site," Oct. 20)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1987 | Associated Press
A La Mesa chemical firm, denied an operating permit because of the potential for a catastrophic accident like the one that killed thousands of people in India, averted a possible shutdown with a court order. Phoenix Research Corp.
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