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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1991
Good news about the criminal justice system is rare these days. But the San Diego County Superior Court has had some successes worth noting during the past year. Under the able supervision of Judge Jesus Rodriguez, the backlog of pending criminal cases has dropped from 3,000 to 1,400, a 53% decrease. Rodriguez is drawing compliments from both sides of the bar for his management changes.
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NEWS
July 21, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Signaling a new, get-tough ethics policy, the California Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a San Diego Superior Court judge should be ousted from the bench for accepting gifts from litigants and lawyers who appeared before him. Judge D. Dennis Adams, an appointee of former Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr., had pleaded with the court to spare him because of his 20 years of often-distinguished work on the bench.
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NEWS
July 21, 1995 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Signaling a new, get-tough ethics policy, the California Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a San Diego Superior Court judge should be ousted from the bench for accepting gifts from litigants and lawyers who appeared before him. Judge D. Dennis Adams, an appointee of former Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr., had pleaded with the court to spare him because of his 20 years of often-distinguished work on the bench.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a glut of jury trials because of the "three-strikes" law, the district attorney, public defender and presiding judge of the Superior Court announced a plan Monday to avert judicial gridlock in the court system. Henceforth, four veteran judges will handle nothing but "three-strikes" cases, in which a criminal defendant faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. Also, designated prosecutors and deputy public defenders will be trained to handle only "three-strikes" cases.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian announced Tuesday that he has appointed freshman state Sen. Larry Stirling (R-San Diego) to a new municipal judgeship in San Diego County. Stirling--an outspoken law-and-order legislator who just last week caused a stir when he jokingly referred to the citizens lobby group Common Cause as "communist" during floor debate--said Tuesday that he asked the governor two months ago to activate his long-standing request for a judicial appointment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1989
A key House committee asked the General Services Administration on Friday to study the possible construction of a permanent federal courthouse in Orange County or northern San Diego County and report back within three months. The House Public Works and Transportation Committee took the action at the request of Rep. C. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach), who called for the study after meeting with Orange County attorneys and judges.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a glut of jury trials because of the "three-strikes" law, the district attorney, public defender and presiding judge of the Superior Court announced a plan Monday to avert judicial gridlock in the court system. Henceforth, four veteran judges will handle nothing but "three-strikes" cases, in which a criminal defendant faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. Also, designated prosecutors and deputy public defenders will be trained to handle only "three-strikes" cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1990
A San Diego Superior Court judge has dismissed a countersuit filed by white separatist Tom Metzger against a national civil rights activist, ruling that there was no legal basis to hear the case in the local courts. Judge Phillip Sharp ruled Wednesday that the San Diego county courts have no jurisdiction over activist Morris Dees, head of the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Ala., said Jim McElroy, a San Diego attorney representing Dees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1986
Concerning the article "New Child Support Rules Mean Higher Costs for Some Parents" (May 5): As the second wife of a divorced father with two small children of my own, I can only be heartily grateful that my husband was not divorced under guidelines being proposed for San Diego County courts. The guidelines are objectionable for three reasons: 1. In practice, they are heavily punitive to divorced fathers, whose children are taken away from them--sometimes bitterly against their will--and who rarely have any say in how the child support they pay is spent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1992 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego County municipal courts will offer traffic scofflaws a three-month amnesty program devised by a task force of court officials instead of the one approved last week by the County Board of Supervisors, court administrators said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1991
Good news about the criminal justice system is rare these days. But the San Diego County Superior Court has had some successes worth noting during the past year. Under the able supervision of Judge Jesus Rodriguez, the backlog of pending criminal cases has dropped from 3,000 to 1,400, a 53% decrease. Rodriguez is drawing compliments from both sides of the bar for his management changes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1989
A key House committee asked the General Services Administration on Friday to study the possible construction of a permanent federal courthouse in Orange County or northern San Diego County and report back within three months. The House Public Works and Transportation Committee took the action at the request of Rep. C. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach), who called for the study after meeting with Orange County attorneys and judges.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian announced Tuesday that he has appointed freshman state Sen. Larry Stirling (R-San Diego) to a new municipal judgeship in San Diego County. Stirling--an outspoken law-and-order legislator who just last week caused a stir when he jokingly referred to the citizens lobby group Common Cause as "communist" during floor debate--said Tuesday that he asked the governor two months ago to activate his long-standing request for a judicial appointment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1985 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
With the informal blessing of the Board of Supervisors, San Diego County's juvenile courts have reestablished their relationship with the controversial youth program VisionQuest. The program uses cross-country wagon train treks and other challenging outdoor activities to rehabilitate delinquents who don't respond to other forms of detention. Juvenile Court Administrator Michael Roddy said Tuesday that referrals to VisionQuest would begin immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1992 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego County Sheriff Jim Roache said Monday that he is so discouraged by the problems associated with his department-run electronic home detention program for female criminals that he may abandon it altogether. Roache is in the midst of an internal study into the workings of the controversial program, which came under scrutiny when sheriff's corrections officials released an 18-year-old woman to home surveillance after she served 31 days of a yearlong sentence.
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