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NEWS
July 22, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In its biggest push yet to develop beyond the Orange County "ranch," the Irvine Co. Monday said it has bought large tracts of land in Silicon Valley and San Diego County where it plans to build office and industrial projects costing $70 million. The developments--eight two-story buildings in La Jolla catering to biomedical research firms and two office buildings in Milpitas--are the latest in a recent series of moves by the privately held Irvine Co.
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NEWS
July 22, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In its biggest push yet to develop beyond the Orange County "ranch," the Irvine Co. Monday said it has bought large tracts of land in Silicon Valley and San Diego County where it plans to build office and industrial projects costing $70 million. The developments--eight two-story buildings in La Jolla catering to biomedical research firms and two office buildings in Milpitas--are the latest in a recent series of moves by the privately held Irvine Co.
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NEWS
October 16, 1988 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Urban Affairs Writer
During a recent radio talk show discussion of the many growth-control measures that will appear on San Diego city and county ballots next month, several callers expressed confusion about the various proposals. Is it Proposition H that places the sharpest restrictions on new housing construction or is it Proposition J? Would Proposition B or Proposition D require local votes on all important land-use decisions?
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word spread that the U.S. Marines planned to build officer housing on the bluffs above the legendary, untouched Trestles surfing beach in northern San Diego County, surfers rose up en masse. And on Wednesday, the wave riders edged out the Marines--at least in the first battle of the war. The California Coastal Commission voted 7-5 to reject plans for 128 townhomes on Camp Pendleton overlooking the beach, instead asking the Marine Corps to study alternatives.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Urban Affairs Writer
The California slow-growth movement was left in disarray Wednesday after decisive defeats of growth-control measures in Riverside County and in the city and county of San Diego. The losses follow the crushing defeat of a slow-growth initiative in Orange County last June and raise questions about the future of a movement that only a few months ago, seemed to be gaining momentum throughout the state.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a letter arrives at state Fish and Game headquarters, Darlene McGriff can tell if it's about the California gnatcatcher even before she opens it. "The envelope smokes," McGriff, a staff zoologist, says with a laugh. The tiny songbird that mews like a kitten and feeds on insects has stirred up more fervor and anxiety than any species ever considered for state protection, state wildlife officials say.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first venture of its kind in the nation, the Viejas band of Mission Indians has approved the development of a $250-million amusement and water park on its East San Diego County reservation. The Indians hope the 120-acre project will piggyback on San Diego County's tourism industry and their own gambling casino and create 2,400 jobs during peak summers after its completion in 1996. The project was approved by 58% of tribal members in a vote taken Wednesday, said Anthony R.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word spread that the U.S. Marines planned to build officer housing on the bluffs above the legendary, untouched Trestles surfing beach in northern San Diego County, surfers rose up en masse. And on Wednesday, the wave riders edged out the Marines--at least in the first battle of the war. The California Coastal Commission voted 7-5 to reject plans for 128 townhomes on Camp Pendleton overlooking the beach, instead asking the Marine Corps to study alternatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1989 | TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writer
An attempt by a volunteer urban-planning and environmental group to protect Camp Pendleton from private development, both for the sake of wildlife there and so it will continue to be a buffer against Orange County's suburban sprawl, has won at least one supporter in Congress. Rep.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | NANCY RAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Palomar Mountain folks live on the mountain to get away from the hustle and bustle down below, and they don't take too kindly to anyone who threatens to bring the world to their doorstep. So a proposal by Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa to build a large church retreat and recreational facility in a mountaintop valley met with almost unanimous opposition when it was first proposed in 1985. For a time, the project was dormant.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following the foray of Caesars World into California Indian gaming, Harrah's Casinos disclosed Wednesday that it will develop a gambling hall on a reservation in northern San Diego County. Harrah's officials and tribal leaders of the Pala band of Mission Indians will formally announce plans today to build a $22-million bingo and card club casino on the Pala reservation, 50 miles north of San Diego and 85 miles southeast of Los Angeles.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first venture of its kind in the nation, the Viejas band of Mission Indians has approved the development of a $250-million amusement and water park on its East San Diego County reservation. The Indians hope the 120-acre project will piggyback on San Diego County's tourism industry and their own gambling casino and create 2,400 jobs during peak summers after its completion in 1996. The project was approved by 58% of tribal members in a vote taken Wednesday, said Anthony R.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a letter arrives at state Fish and Game headquarters, Darlene McGriff can tell if it's about the California gnatcatcher even before she opens it. "The envelope smokes," McGriff, a staff zoologist, says with a laugh. The tiny songbird that mews like a kitten and feeds on insects has stirred up more fervor and anxiety than any species ever considered for state protection, state wildlife officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California gnatcatcher, a tiny bird that mews like a kitten and feeds on pesky gnats, is sending waves of trepidation through Southern California's building industry and public planning agencies. The bird, which nests in the coastal sage scrub that carpets much of the undeveloped land in the Southland, is being considered for the federal endangered species list, presenting what some in the building industry say is one of the greatest threats they have ever faced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990 | NANCY RAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A chance to bring city youth out to the wilderness to see the wonders of God's handiwork is what Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa seeks in proposing a sprawling retreat center on the top of Palomar Mountain. But San Diego County officials Thursday ordered their planning staff to prepare formal denial statements for the 522-acre mountaintop project unless church leaders can convince the county that it will not destroy the pristine wilderness it seeks to develop.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Once severely lacking in hotel rooms, the La Jolla area has seen its share of new hotel openings of late. And now the area has another new hotel in its future: a new 210-room, $59-million Ritz-Carlton luxury hotel to be located near the UC San Diego campus. Groundbreaking for the hotel situated in the Blackhorse Farms development on Torrey Pines has been scheduled for late next month.
NEWS
December 19, 1988 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
Roused by proliferating complaints by residents of new subdivisions in fast-growing northern San Diego County, authorities are using a new strategy to crack down on camps of migrant workers. With the new U.S. immigration law granting legal status to many of the migrants, the U.S. Border Patrol has been all but handcuffed in dealing with complaints and no longer is the chosen agency of enforcement. Increasingly, local officials are turning to the County Health Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California gnatcatcher, a tiny bird that mews like a kitten and feeds on pesky gnats, is sending waves of trepidation through Southern California's building industry and public planning agencies. The bird, which nests in the coastal sage scrub that carpets much of the undeveloped land in the Southland, is being considered for the federal endangered species list, presenting what some in the building industry say is one of the greatest threats they have ever faced.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | NANCY RAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Palomar Mountain folks live on the mountain to get away from the hustle and bustle down below, and they don't take too kindly to anyone who threatens to bring the world to their doorstep. So a proposal by Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa to build a large church retreat and recreational facility in a mountaintop valley met with almost unanimous opposition when it was first proposed in 1985. For a time, the project was dormant.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Aerospace manufacturer General Dynamics said Thursday that it is in the process of buying a 60-acre parcel north of San Diego, in what would be one of the largest land acquisitions in San Diego County by an industrial user in recent years.
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