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NEWS
July 17, 1988 | H.G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
The morning sun had not yet peeked over La Costa, where residents of the upscale community were nestled in their comfortable homes. But across the road from the quiet neighborhood, cooking fires were already crackling in the misty darkness. The smell of burning wood wafting over the rugged foothills mixed with the odor of morning meals being cooked in the "restaurantes en el monte." It was 5:30 a.m.
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NEWS
July 17, 1988 | H.G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
The morning sun had not yet peeked over La Costa, where residents of the upscale community were nestled in their comfortable homes. But across the road from the quiet neighborhood, cooking fires were already crackling in the misty darkness. The smell of burning wood wafting over the rugged foothills mixed with the odor of morning meals being cooked in the "restaurantes en el monte." It was 5:30 a.m.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1992
San Diego County's largest labor organization announced Monday it will endorse mayoral candidate Peter Navarro. The San Diego-Imperial Counties Labor Council, with a membership of more than 108,000, weighed in on Navarro's side primarily because of his opposition to the proposed free-trade pact between Canada, Mexico and the United States.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | H. G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All unfair labor practice hearings have been canceled by National Labor Relations Board officials because of a budget shortfall that has hampered the federal agency and threatened its employees with temporary layoffs. The cancellations affect every NLRB field and regional office in the nation, including the office in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1986 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
The strains of a Mexican pop tune wafted from a radio mounted on the planting rig being towed by a tractor across the farm field. Dragged behind on runners mounted with bucket seats sat a crew of eight planters, trays of cauliflower seedlings on their laps. As the odd assemblage moved along, the planters dropped seedlings into eight moistened holes punched into the rows by jets of water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1992 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Free trade could make the San Diego-Tijuana region an economically and culturally dynamic, world-class metropolis or a polluted, chaotic haven for corporations exploiting cheap labor, according to experts who debated the region's future Friday. Presidential politics and negotiations over the North American Free Trade Agreement have pushed into national prominence the issues that have been ubiquitous along the U.S.-Mexico border during recent years.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite three successful years as distribution manager for Bestronics Inc., a small electronics distributor in San Diego, Pam Kenny was ready to leave her job. The Rancho Bernardo woman liked her boss and had put in many long hours at the company. But the problem was that after she became pregnant with her third child, she and her husband began calculating the costs of keeping a 3-year-old, a 2-year-old and an infant in day care every month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1987 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
For years, scores of undocumented farm workers squatted on a one-acre triangle of federal dirt not far from the perimeter of the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base. Their crude dwellings lined an earthen basketball court, where, on Sundays, the laborers would play ball and spectators would gather, imparting the squalid, isolated hamlet with a festive air. Conditions in the makeshift encampment were so bad that, in September, 1985, a U.S.
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