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May 27, 1990 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost a century, the bats have provided a creepy footnote to the history of the Olivenhain town hall, a sturdy redwood meeting place built in 1895 by the German farmers who settled this north San Diego County community. Old-timers say the migratory creatures moved into the rafters of the rustic hall not long after the last nails were pounded in.
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NEWS
May 27, 1990 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For almost a century, the bats have provided a creepy footnote to the history of the Olivenhain town hall, a sturdy redwood meeting place built in 1895 by the German farmers who settled this north San Diego County community. Old-timers say the migratory creatures moved into the rafters of the rustic hall not long after the last nails were pounded in.
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NEWS
February 5, 1989
Rancho Santa Fe, an exclusive residential community in central San Diego County, has been designated as a California historical landmark. The designation by the California Office of Historic Preservation, while prestigious, is mostly symbolic, officials of the unincorporated community said.
NEWS
February 5, 1989
Rancho Santa Fe, an exclusive residential community in central San Diego County, has been designated as a California historical landmark. The designation by the California Office of Historic Preservation, while prestigious, is mostly symbolic, officials of the unincorporated community said.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | Richard Crawford, Richard Crawford is archivist for the San Diego Historical Society.
Our stages were the Concord type, miserable things to ride in. The motion made the passengers seasick, and the dust was terrible. -Katie Leng, stagecoach passenger Stagecoach travel was no picnic in backcountry San Diego of the 1800s, but until the appearance of automobiles on county roads after the turn of the century, travelers had little choice in their mode of travel. Horse-drawn coaches offered reliable service--albeit slow, dusty, bumpy and, occasionally, eventful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1990 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Baskin was on the telephone with his father in Santa Cruz, describing his swell new rental home in Encinitas. "What do you mean you live on a boat?" his father asked. "You mean a boat floating in the water?" "No, Dad." "So you mean you live on the beach?" "Not exactly, Dad."
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