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May 8, 1990 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little more than a year ago, political consultant Nick Johnson half-jokingly described San Diego elections as being "usually about as unpredictable as elections in Russia." "If you're an incumbent here, it's like being on the Communist Party ticket in Russia or East Germany," the Democratic consultant said. "You're that safe." Today, Johnson's comparison is perhaps even more apt than when he made it, though for reasons he scarcely could have imagined.
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NEWS
May 8, 1990 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little more than a year ago, political consultant Nick Johnson half-jokingly described San Diego elections as being "usually about as unpredictable as elections in Russia." "If you're an incumbent here, it's like being on the Communist Party ticket in Russia or East Germany," the Democratic consultant said. "You're that safe." Today, Johnson's comparison is perhaps even more apt than when he made it, though for reasons he scarcely could have imagined.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1988 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
In the midst of his 1984 reelection campaign, then-San Diego Mayor Roger Hedgecock was engulfed in the kind of serious political trouble that normally attracts opponents the way a slab of bloody meat draws a school of hungry sharks. With Hedgecock facing local and state investigations into campaign finance violations that ultimately drove him from office in December, 1985, numerous local officeholders contemplated a mayoral candidacy.
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
When Paul Eckert's contributions to North San Diego County politics are tallied, humility is not likely to head the list. And Wednesday, as Eckert began to contemplate the stunning primary election defeat that cut short his quest for a third term on the Board of Supervisors, he showed why.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1986 | ARMANDO ACUNA and NANCY RAY, Times Staff Writers
When he was a kid growing up poor in Chula Vista, David L. Malcolm vowed someday to be rich. The bravado behind such a promise was not unusual. Poor kids in small, working-class towns across the nation make similar vows every day. But, while most others have faltered, Malcolm became a boy wonder and kept his promise. Today, at age 32, David Malcolm has used this hunger for success and a hard-charging--some say arrogant--style to lead him from the valley to the mountaintop.
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