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NEWS
March 14, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a glut of jury trials because of the "three-strikes" law, the district attorney, public defender and presiding judge of the Superior Court announced a plan Monday to avert judicial gridlock in the court system. Henceforth, four veteran judges will handle nothing but "three-strikes" cases, in which a criminal defendant faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. Also, designated prosecutors and deputy public defenders will be trained to handle only "three-strikes" cases.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Declaring "let the people be heard," a judge Monday refused to block the vote count in a disputed mayoral election that has gripped this city while garnering national attention for the unlikely leader -- a last-minute write-in candidate, Councilwoman Donna Frye. With an estimated 30,000 provisional, write-in and absentee ballots yet to be counted, Frye, the owner of a surfboard shop, is clinging to a lead of just over 1,800 votes over incumbent Mayor Dick Murphy.
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NEWS
February 7, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once he was a dominant and respected presence on the San Diego Superior Court--known for his hard work, confident manner and booming voice. But on Thursday, former Superior Court Judge Michael Greer--now sick, disgraced and described in court papers as suicidal--stood before a federal judge and struggled to take responsibility for "this incredible disaster" that led him to plead guilty to taking bribes from a flamboyant trial attorney. In the end, U.S.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once he was a dominant and respected presence on the San Diego Superior Court--known for his hard work, confident manner and booming voice. But on Thursday, former Superior Court Judge Michael Greer--now sick, disgraced and described in court papers as suicidal--stood before a federal judge and struggled to take responsibility for "this incredible disaster" that led him to plead guilty to taking bribes from a flamboyant trial attorney. In the end, U.S.
NEWS
June 24, 1996 | TONY PERRY and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This is a tale of two counties and three strikes, of how the distance between San Francisco and San Diego cannot be measured in mere miles when it comes to applying California's controversial sentencing law. "In San Francisco, you get caught with a rock of cocaine, and you probably get probation," says Thomas Whelan, a prosecutor for 20 years before being appointed to the San Diego County Superior Court bench in 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI, in the wake of bribery convictions of two ex-judges and a prominent attorney, announced this week that it has instituted a hotline for people in San Diego to report allegations of governmental corruption. Robert Walsh, special agent in charge of the FBI office, said the FBI will investigate all reports of corruption in local, state or federal government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1992
San Diego County prosecutors may not seek a sentence of life without parole for Robert Earl Mack, accused of murdering one official and wounding another last January at a General Dynamics plant, a state appellate court ruled Monday. In a brief order, the 4th District Court of Appeal let stand San Diego Superior Court Judge Terry O'Rourke's May 27 ruling upholding the charge of murder but dismissing the allegation that the shootings were committed with the special circumstance of "lying in wait."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1992
In a hearing prompted by a probe of improper influence peddling on the San Diego Superior Court bench, a state appeal court signaled Monday that it is likely to overturn a Superior Court ruling and open to public review the daily records of local judges' official calendars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1991
A San Diego County "drug court," hailed by a national association as a law enforcement innovation, slashed the time some repeat offenders spend in local jails, county officials said at a news conference Tuesday. The Superior Court also was honored by the National Assn. of Counties for its fast-track program, which disposes of 90% of all civil cases within 24 months, and its independent calendar program, under which civil cases are assigned to a single judge until settlement or trial.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A San Diego County Superior Court judge issued a temporary restraining order preventing The Times from publishing any information about security measures installed at the home of Sheriff John Duffy. The unusual court order, signed by Judge Jeffrey Miller, states that The Times is prohibited from publishing any information regarding the "nature, layout, or configuration of security measures in" Duffy's home, or any information about the address of the house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI, in the wake of bribery convictions of two ex-judges and a prominent attorney, announced this week that it has instituted a hotline for people in San Diego to report allegations of governmental corruption. Robert Walsh, special agent in charge of the FBI office, said the FBI will investigate all reports of corruption in local, state or federal government.
NEWS
June 24, 1996 | TONY PERRY and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This is a tale of two counties and three strikes, of how the distance between San Francisco and San Diego cannot be measured in mere miles when it comes to applying California's controversial sentencing law. "In San Francisco, you get caught with a rock of cocaine, and you probably get probation," says Thomas Whelan, a prosecutor for 20 years before being appointed to the San Diego County Superior Court bench in 1990.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Monday upheld San Diego's nighttime curfew for teenagers, one of the strictest and most vigorously enforced curfews in the nation. Judge Marilyn L. Huff ruled that an ordinance that, with few exceptions, orders teenagers off the streets at 10 p.m. is constitutional. The curfew had been on the books since 1947 but was sporadically enforced until the City Council ordered it applied rigorously two years ago as a way to fight crime.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | ERNEST SANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was more than a decade ago that Chris, a scrawny 13-year-old boy with a mop of long hair, posed nude for convicted child molester John Lewis, then 33. Lewis approached Chris at a California beach and complimented his surfing. The next day, Lewis shot frame after frame of the youth in various stages of undress. The photo session concluded with Lewis orally copulating Chris and telling him to "keep it between us," according to Chris. Lewis returned to his adopted home in Vancouver, British Columbia, where he continued to photograph and collect nude and semi-nude pictures of boys and men, amassing thousands of photos, prosecutors contended at Lewis' recent trial.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a glut of jury trials because of the "three-strikes" law, the district attorney, public defender and presiding judge of the Superior Court announced a plan Monday to avert judicial gridlock in the court system. Henceforth, four veteran judges will handle nothing but "three-strikes" cases, in which a criminal defendant faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. Also, designated prosecutors and deputy public defenders will be trained to handle only "three-strikes" cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the second year in a row, San Diego's federal judges have the heaviest criminal caseload of any federal court in the United States, according to statistics just released in Washington. At 153 cases per judge, the filing rate at the San Diego court in fiscal 1992 was three times the national average, according to a federal judicial management office. In San Diego, where the federal court traditionally has been loaded with cases linked to the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lawsuit that claims a San Diego family-court judge committed fraud and legal malpractice before he took the bench should be heard in San Diego County, a state appellate court ruled Monday. The 4th District Court of Appeal ordered the case against Judge Thomas Ashworth III returned to San Diego Superior Court, saying it was improperly ordered out of the county. Judge Michael I.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1992
Roger Sing Ip, convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting death of a 15-year-old boy in 1989 and sentenced to five years in prison, received a fair trial and a just sentence, a state appeal court has ruled. Ip, 35, of Spring Valley was convicted in February, 1991, of the July 10, 1989, shooting of Kurt Yokes, a Mission Bay High School freshman, after Ip's car nearly collided with a car in which Yokes was a passenger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1992
Roger Sing Ip, convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting death of a 15-year-old boy in 1989 and sentenced to five years in prison, received a fair trial and a just sentence, a state appeal court has ruled. Ip, 35, of Spring Valley was convicted in February, 1991, of the July 10, 1989, shooting of Kurt Yokes, a Mission Bay High School freshman, after Ip's car nearly collided with a car in which Yokes was a passenger.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former San Diego police officer Henry Hubbard, who maintained for nearly a year that he was innocent of a string of rapes and robberies last summer along local beaches, abruptly reversed himself Thursday and pleaded guilty or no contest to all 38 felony charges against him. Under a deal that the lawyers in the case stressed was technically not a formal plea bargain, Hubbard pleaded guilty to 26 charges and no contest to 12 others.
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