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SPORTS
April 23, 1998 | Associated Press
The San Diego City Council has reaffirmed its commitment to building a new ballpark for the Padres in Centre City East. Meanwhile, a conflict was brewing among members of the San Diego Port Commission regarding the 10th Avenue Marine Terminal as a potential stadium site. The port has undertaken a feasibility study of the marine terminal, site of a $1 billion ballpark proposal.
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NEWS
June 13, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every city agonizes over big civic building projects. But this sunny metropolis has perfected the art of government by indecision, litigation and political risk aversion. Just ask Larry Lucchino, president and co-owner of the San Diego Padres. He's still puzzling over how differently the game of politics is played in his adopted San Diego than in his native Pittsburgh.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Decision Due on Downtown Complex: The San Diego City Council will take a big step tonight toward a new $156-million downtown sports and entertainment arena if it votes, as expected, to authorize the Center City Development Corp. redevelopment agency to begin a feasibility study for the new structure.
SPORTS
April 23, 1998 | Associated Press
The San Diego City Council has reaffirmed its commitment to building a new ballpark for the Padres in Centre City East. Meanwhile, a conflict was brewing among members of the San Diego Port Commission regarding the 10th Avenue Marine Terminal as a potential stadium site. The port has undertaken a feasibility study of the marine terminal, site of a $1 billion ballpark proposal.
SPORTS
June 3, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
San Diego State University received clearance to build a 12,000-seat sports and entertainment arena when a state appeals court rejected arguments that the project would adversely affect the surrounding neighborhood.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1989 | GENE YASUDA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese contracting giant Shimizu Corp. has acquired a majority interest in the $171-million Great American Plaza office complex now under construction in downtown San Diego, Great American Bank announced. Thursday's announcement capped a two-year search for financing by Great American, a $16.4-billion savings and loan based in San Diego that will move its headquarters to the site upon completion in 1991. Shimizu Land Corp.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
The City Council adopted an interim ordinance Tuesday that would reduce by almost 50% the number of residential dwellings that could be constructed in the state's second-largest city during the next year. After listening to 7 1/2 hours of public testimony and debate, the council voted 8 to 1 to permit developers to build only 8,000 dwellings in the next year, a sharp reduction from the 15,000 units constructed in 1986, when low interest rates fueled record construction.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writers
Mayor Maureen O'Connor and City Councilman Ed Struiksma on Wednesday unveiled dual plans to drastically restrict the rate of growth they say is overwhelming streets, sewers and other municipal services in burgeoning neighborhoods. O'Connor's proposal would scale back the rate of growth to population forecasts made in 1984, which would reduce growth by at least 60% in some northern areas.
NEWS
April 3, 1988
A slow-growth initiative intended to limit housing development in San Diego to as few as 4,000 units per year has qualified for the November ballot, according to the city clerk's office. The announcement follows the filing of more than 85,000 signatures in favor of what is called the Quality of Life Initiative. The City Council, which will be asked later this month to place the measure on the Nov.
SPORTS
October 11, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With enthusiasm and the economy both lagging, LeRoy Walker, expected to be elected today as the U.S. Olympic Committee's president, said Saturday that he might appoint a task force to explore whether the organization wants to proceed with its commitment to participate in a training center near San Diego. Walker, the USOC's treasurer since 1989, said at a news conference during the USOC Congress that he would encourage the task force to complete its work within six months.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The city of San Diego on Tuesday approved the nation's most sweeping and ambitious land-use strategy--one aimed at protecting a virtual Noah's Ark of 85 endangered species while setting the pace for development in much of San Diego County.
NEWS
January 20, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a season of high hopes and disappointing results, the San Diego Chargers are no longer contestants for pro football's annual prize. But that is not to say that San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium no longer provides high-stakes, thumb-in-the-eye combat.
NEWS
January 8, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The discussion at the City Council was a dry one: bonds and debt service and construction schedules and blah blah blah . . . And then a councilman used the dreaded C-word. "We don't want to be a Cleveland here in San Diego, and that's what you're asking us to do," fumed Councilman Juan Vargas. The Cleveland reference was designed as the ultimate squelch to three political activists who oppose the publicly financed expansion of San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York is the Big Apple, Dallas the Big D, and New Orleans the Big Easy. But when it comes to hosting national political conventions, San Diego--the pretty, sunny ingenue of cities tucked away in the nation's southwest corner--is the Big Hurt. Alone among the nation's biggest cities, San Diego has never hosted one of these quintessentially American events that have mixed democracy and tomfoolery since the short-lived Anti-Masonic Party met in Baltimore in 1831.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Navy Hearing Scheduled: The Navy will hold a public meeting Tuesday at the Naval Training Center in San Diego to discuss the environmental cleanup required at the center before it can be developed for civilian use. The service, which is leaving the 560-acre, prime harbor-side site, plans to turn it over to the city, whose mayor, Susan Golding, heads a planning committee trying to figure out the best--and most lucrative--uses for the property.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials here have spoken glowingly of building a $155-million, state-of-the-art downtown sports arena. Despite the absence of a full-time tenant and amid a flurry of fiscal concerns, Mayor Susan Golding labeled the project her top priority.
NEWS
January 8, 1996 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The discussion at the City Council was a dry one: bonds and debt service and construction schedules and blah blah blah . . . And then a councilman used the dreaded C-word. "We don't want to be a Cleveland here in San Diego, and that's what you're asking us to do," fumed Councilman Juan Vargas. The Cleveland reference was designed as the ultimate squelch to three political activists who oppose the publicly financed expansion of San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium.
SPORTS
June 10, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Buss, saying he misses hockey, has formally agreed to try to buy an NHL team and bring it here. That announcement was to have been made Wednesday at a news conference, but the conference was canceled.
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