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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than a year after Japanese aircraft attacked Pearl Harbor, a group of San Diegans began to plan for the inevitable day when the war--and San Diego's booming wartime economy--would begin to wind down. The group was given a simple charge in 1942, according to Chamber of Commerce records: Keep San Diego from turning into a postwar "ghost town, with idle plants, empty stores, hotels and homes, unemployment and stagnation of business."
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
January 19, 2004 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
After Green Giant closed its vegetable processing plant here and moved her job to Mexico in the early 1990s, Yolanda Navarro turned her experience into a crusade against globalization. She crisscrossed the country with a plea: Don't support the North American Free Trade Agreement, or thousands more jobs will be lost.
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SPORTS
March 29, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL and GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writers
If it stands up to appeal, a New York judge's decision giving the America's Cup to New Zealand will deprive San Diego of the estimated $1.2 billion the 1991 defense was expected to generate.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | TONY PERRY and NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Faced with growing public outrage over soaring utility bills in San Diego and southern Orange County, state legislators Thursday agreed to hold a hearing on whether to amend, delay or even repeal the utility deregulation bill blamed for the increases. State Senate President Pro Tem John Burton (D-San Francisco) and state Sen. Steve Peace (D-San Diego), author of the deregulation bill, agreed to a hearing after receiving an urgent plea from former San Diego Mayor Maureen O'Connor.
SPORTS
May 3, 1992 | ALAN DROOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The America's Cup was supposed to be an easy sail on golden pond, complete with brass ring for the local economy to grab. With Dennis Conner expected to make his first full-blown defense of the Cup on home water, race organizers predicted an economic windfall of as much as $1 billion for the San Diego area. It would be like having a couple of Super Bowls and a World Series rolled into one. So much for projections.
SPORTS
August 23, 1988 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
A few months ago, Stephen L. Lindsey was selling no more than two cases a month of Steinlager--New Zealand's favorite brew--at his Bula's Pub & Eatery, a small saloon and restaurant on Orange Avenue in placid Coronado. But then Michael Fay and his renegade America's Cup syndicate swaggered into town and set up housekeeping just down the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1986
We are writing to rebut the opinions of Mr. Christopher Pook, the promoter of the proposed Del Mar Grand Prix (March 30), as to the "so-called benefits" to our coastal communities of this event. He incorrectly states that the detrimental impacts have been mitigated. But his consultant, who drafted the environmental impact report (EIR), cannot explain away the objective conclusions of the County Department of Planning and Land Use that: "It is clear from the information presented in EIR and its appendix that noise impacts are significant and not mitigable . Levels of 80 decibels in nearby residential areas and 70 decibels nearly a mile away are unacceptable ."
BUSINESS
October 5, 1989 | CAROLINE LEMKE
Terry (Hayes) Riggins has been appointed executive vice president and chief operating officer of United Way of San Diego County. She is responsible for all internal agency operations including fund raising, fund distribution and service programs. Riggins, a native of Seattle, joined United Way of San Diego County in 1984 as associate executive director for planning, allocations and agency relations.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1992 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
San Diego County's unemployment rate rose to 6.8% in April, a reflection of the persistent ebbing of jobs overall locally, particularly in the manufacturing, construction and financial employment sectors. The jobless rate, which was up from 6.6% the previous month and 5.9% in April, 1991, also reached 6.8% in February, according to figures from the state Employment Development Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1987 | H.G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
The America's Cup regatta is expected to generate about $1.2 billion in revenues for San Diego when the event is held in 1991 off Point Loma, according to an economic analysis released Friday. Standing outside a modest Mission Hills home, officials from the San Diego America's Cup Task Force and Sail America Foundation attempted to deflect the sport's elitist image by insisting that revenues from the event will trickle down to every neighborhood in the county.
NEWS
January 6, 2000 | CHRIS KRAUL and ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They are the "Quillionaires," the lucky ones who have struck it rich from holdings in one of the country's hottest stocks, Qualcomm Inc., and they are out buying houses and imported cars, giving to local causes and elevating the San Diego economy. They owe their newfound wealth to the stunning rise in Qualcomm's stock price to $156.44 from $6.50 over the last year, the fifth-largest gain of any U.S. company.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If plentiful construction jobs are a sign of better times ahead, then San Diego has something to look forward to. But ironically, the economy might be improving a little too fast in this region devastated by aerospace and defense cutbacks in the early 1990s: Inflationary pressures are starting to build on wages and housing. With a bevy of infrastructure and tourism-related projects underway or soon to break ground, construction employment is on the upswing and is expected to keep rising in 1997.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES SENIOR ECONOMICS EDITOR
The debates about economic growth at the Republican convention beginning here in 13 days will be narrow and short-term in contrast to the innovative ideas being tried in the city outside the Convention Center. San Diego is just completing an ambitious $4-million effort to link its city government, businesses, schools, hospitals and libraries on computer-telecommunications networks.
OPINION
July 28, 1996 | FRANK del OLMO, Frank del Olmo is assistant to the editor of The Times and a regular columnist
The civic leaders who helped lure the 1996 Republican National Convention to this lovely border city estimate that it will pump about $100 million into the local economy. That's not quite as much as the $136 million spent when the 1988 Super Bowl game was played here, but still a respectable chunk of change. But the economic activity generated by the GOP and Super Bowl high-rollers combined pales in comparison to the estimated $2.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When San Diego was named as the site for the upcoming Republican National Convention, the local economy was still whacked-out from its third straight year of recession--one of the state's bloodiest victims of defense industry cutbacks and savings and loan failures. But when the political and media hordes descend here this summer, they will find an economy on the mend and employment recovered to pre-misery levels, thanks largely to telephones and tourists.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Paladion mall, a sleek downtown citadel patrolled by well-dressed guards with earphones, a customer from Mexico walks in and buys $60,000 worth of designer suits at the Bernini boutique. He pays cash. At Price Club 10 miles to the south, a suburban bastion of U.S. consumer culture, the bustle of Spanish-speaking families and cars with yellow Baja California license plates resembles a Mexican marketplace.
NEWS
January 6, 2000 | CHRIS KRAUL and ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They are the "Quillionaires," the lucky ones who have struck it rich from holdings in one of the country's hottest stocks, Qualcomm Inc., and they are out buying houses and imported cars, giving to local causes and elevating the San Diego economy. They owe their newfound wealth to the stunning rise in Qualcomm's stock price to $156.44 from $6.50 over the last year, the fifth-largest gain of any U.S. company.
OPINION
July 28, 1996 | FRANK del OLMO, Frank del Olmo is assistant to the editor of The Times and a regular columnist
The civic leaders who helped lure the 1996 Republican National Convention to this lovely border city estimate that it will pump about $100 million into the local economy. That's not quite as much as the $136 million spent when the 1988 Super Bowl game was played here, but still a respectable chunk of change. But the economic activity generated by the GOP and Super Bowl high-rollers combined pales in comparison to the estimated $2.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990 and the Pentagon shipped 60,000 uniformed personnel from here to the Middle East, most people assumed the sharp economic jolt this caused--lowered retail and home sales, for example--would end when the troops returned. But that short-lived episode turned out to be a teaser for more fundamental woes to come. Even in the context of California's dismal 1990s economy, San Diego--unduly dependent on the shrinking military-industrial complex--has been a special case.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Navy, in a move expected to bring an infusion of defense funds to Southern California, has chosen San Diego to become the home port of a new guided missile destroyer scheduled to join the fleet in February, two congressmen announced Tuesday. Reps. Randy Cunningham (R-San Diego) and Duncan Hunter (R-El Cajon) announced that the arrival of the guided missile destroyer Curtis Wilbur, under construction at a Maine shipyard, will bring 337 military personnel to San Diego and add $8.
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