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San Diego Elections 1988

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NEWS
December 15, 1988
Former San Diego Police Chief Bill Kolender ordered the release of a confidential mailing list of Neighborhood Watch block captains to an advertising firm promoting a tax increase to build new jails in 1986, according to the ad agency and three highly placed police sources. The list was used again in a political campaign this fall. Chief Bob Burgreen, who recently succeeded Kolender, apologized to the block captains and ordered an investigation into how the list got out.
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NEWS
December 15, 1988
Former San Diego Police Chief Bill Kolender ordered the release of a confidential mailing list of Neighborhood Watch block captains to an advertising firm promoting a tax increase to build new jails in 1986, according to the ad agency and three highly placed police sources. The list was used again in a political campaign this fall. Chief Bob Burgreen, who recently succeeded Kolender, apologized to the block captains and ordered an investigation into how the list got out.
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NEWS
June 8, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Orange County slow-growth proponents conceded defeat Tuesday as their far-reaching measure was being rejected by voters opposed to the idea of linking future growth in unincorporated areas to the ability to provide additional public services to new developments. "There's no question we're going to lose," said a disappointed Tom Rogers, co-founder of the group that sponsored the initiative.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Having invested $400 million in refurbishing the aging Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, metropolitan Sacramento voters narrowly rejected a proposal to abandon the plant and decided instead to see exactly what their money bought. By a margin of 50.4% to 49.6%, voters defeated Measure B, which would have closed the troubled but recently refurbished plant. Rather, it will continue to operate for an 18-month trial period, as outlined in rival Measure C, which was favored by 51.
NEWS
April 3, 1988
A slow-growth initiative intended to limit housing development in San Diego to as few as 4,000 units per year has qualified for the November ballot, according to the city clerk's office. The announcement follows the filing of more than 85,000 signatures in favor of what is called the Quality of Life Initiative. The City Council, which will be asked later this month to place the measure on the Nov.
NEWS
June 9, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Having invested $400 million in refurbishing the aging Rancho Seco nuclear power plant, metropolitan Sacramento voters narrowly rejected a proposal to abandon the plant and decided instead to see exactly what their money bought. By a margin of 50.4% to 49.6%, voters defeated Measure B, which would have closed the troubled but recently refurbished plant. Rather, it will continue to operate for an 18-month trial period, as outlined in rival Measure C, which was favored by 51.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Orange County slow-growth proponents conceded defeat Tuesday as their far-reaching measure was being rejected by voters opposed to the idea of linking future growth in unincorporated areas to the ability to provide additional public services to new developments. "There's no question we're going to lose," said a disappointed Tom Rogers, co-founder of the group that sponsored the initiative.
NEWS
April 3, 1988
A slow-growth initiative intended to limit housing development in San Diego to as few as 4,000 units per year has qualified for the November ballot, according to the city clerk's office. The announcement follows the filing of more than 85,000 signatures in favor of what is called the Quality of Life Initiative. The City Council, which will be asked later this month to place the measure on the Nov.
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