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SPORTS
July 31, 1996 | TONY PERRY
An appeals court panel Tuesday approved a controversial financing plan to expand San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium by 10,000 seats and install more luxury boxes, a move city officials say is necessary to keep the Chargers from leaving San Diego. The financing plan, which would require the team to pay for bonds with increased rent, higher parking fees, and a greater return from concessions, has been attacked by three anti-tax activists as a violation of Proposition 13.
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NEWS
September 20, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the City Council refusing to allocate more cash, the Padres baseball team announced Tuesday that it will soon suspend construction of its new downtown ballpark, a project already snared in politics, litigation and a U.S. attorney's investigation.
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NEWS
April 15, 1990 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER and Compiled by Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
The city of Los Angeles has close to $249 million in unpaid parking tickets on the books--almost three times the city's annual ticket revenue and enough money to fund the Fire Department for a year. A total of 5.4 million tickets have not been paid, records show. And 74,000 vehicles have accumulated five or more tickets, making them susceptible to towing or impounding by the city.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every city agonizes over big civic building projects. But this sunny metropolis has perfected the art of government by indecision, litigation and political risk aversion. Just ask Larry Lucchino, president and co-owner of the San Diego Padres. He's still puzzling over how differently the game of politics is played in his adopted San Diego than in his native Pittsburgh.
NEWS
June 8, 1994 | Associated Press
The San Diego City Council has voted overwhelmingly to increase the city's hotel room tax to raise money for a downtown sports arena and renovations at the Convention Center. Monday's vote raises the transient occupancy tax, or TOT, 1.5 cents, to 10.5 cents on the dollar, beginning Aug. 1. Mayor Susan Golding and tourism officials have lobbied for the tax hike, claiming that it is crucial to the development of the downtown area. "I want to thank the council," Golding said after the vote.
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that vanishing revenues have "taken us past the point of taking meat off the bones, we're now taking bones off the body," the city manager announced a broad range of spending cuts Friday that include asking city employees to take time off without pay. City Manager Jack McGrory said about 4,000 city employees have been asked to take up to 26 days of leave without pay during this fiscal year because of a projected revenue shortfall of $16.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego and Avalon would be the big winners if Congress changes an arcane federal law that forbids foreign cruise ships from calling at two U.S. ports in a row, according to a study commissioned by the California Trade and Commerce Agency's Division of Tourism. Legislation is pending in the U.S. Senate to amend the 111-year-old Passenger Services Act--which was originally intended to protect U.S.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego County district attorney's office has declined to file criminal charges against the former head of the San Diego Convention Center, who authorized $150,000 worth of questionable expenditures, including some to industry acquaintances from Anaheim Stadium and the Anaheim Convention Center. "The bottom line is that there will be no criminal action taken" against former convention center director Tom Liegler, said Donna Alm, spokeswoman for the San Diego Convention Center.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials here have spoken glowingly of building a $155-million, state-of-the-art downtown sports arena. Despite the absence of a full-time tenant and amid a flurry of fiscal concerns, Mayor Susan Golding labeled the project her top priority.
NEWS
September 10, 1999 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rising number of illegal immigrants crossing the border in isolated areas is severely straining the finances of impoverished rural communities on the U.S. side that must foot the bill for extra jail space, emergency medical care and even burials for migrants who succumb to the harsh conditions of the journey.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a high-octane competition between the two carbonated rivals, San Diego is poised to choose Pepsi-Cola over Coca-Cola as the city's official soft drink. In the history of the cola wars, the battle for San Diego has been the biggest prize yet.
SPORTS
June 22, 1999 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is one of Bud Selig's stump speeches. If your team needs help building a new stadium in your town, the commissioner comes in and says, "If there's no new ballpark, baseball will not survive in (your town here)." Selig has delivered much the same speech to civic groups, corporate leaders and politicians across North America, including his own town, Milwaukee, where next season the Brewers will be playing in the new Miller Park.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego and Avalon would be the big winners if Congress changes an arcane federal law that forbids foreign cruise ships from calling at two U.S. ports in a row, according to a study commissioned by the California Trade and Commerce Agency's Division of Tourism. Legislation is pending in the U.S. Senate to amend the 111-year-old Passenger Services Act--which was originally intended to protect U.S.
SPORTS
February 15, 1997 | Associated Press
Qualcomm Stadium? Officials of a company seeking to market its wireless telephone system nationwide said Friday that the firm is ready to step up with $18 million to help pay for renovation of Jack Murphy Stadium and save the 1997 Charger season and '98 Super Bowl for the facility. All it will cost is the name of the stadium, which carries that of a former San Diego Union sports editor who was instrumental in getting it built and in spiriting the Chargers out of Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversy over the $78-million expansion plan for San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium ratcheted up a notch this week when city officials moved closer to scheduling a public vote on a referendum aimed at halting the expansion. But whether that referendum will involve the full plan for the publicly owned stadium or just $18 million of the project will be determined by the courts.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversy over the $78-million expansion plan for San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium ratcheted up a notch this week when city officials moved closer to scheduling a public vote on a referendum aimed at halting the expansion. But whether that referendum will involve the full plan for the publicly owned stadium or just $18 million of the project will be determined by the courts.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When San Diego was named as the site for the upcoming Republican National Convention, the local economy was still whacked-out from its third straight year of recession--one of the state's bloodiest victims of defense industry cutbacks and savings and loan failures. But when the political and media hordes descend here this summer, they will find an economy on the mend and employment recovered to pre-misery levels, thanks largely to telephones and tourists.
SPORTS
July 31, 1996 | TONY PERRY
An appeals court panel Tuesday approved a controversial financing plan to expand San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium by 10,000 seats and install more luxury boxes, a move city officials say is necessary to keep the Chargers from leaving San Diego. The financing plan, which would require the team to pay for bonds with increased rent, higher parking fees, and a greater return from concessions, has been attacked by three anti-tax activists as a violation of Proposition 13.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When San Diego was named as the site for the upcoming Republican National Convention, the local economy was still whacked-out from its third straight year of recession--one of the state's bloodiest victims of defense industry cutbacks and savings and loan failures. But when the political and media hordes descend here this summer, they will find an economy on the mend and employment recovered to pre-misery levels, thanks largely to telephones and tourists.
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