Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Diego Harbor
IN THE NEWS

San Diego Harbor

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
July 11, 2004 | Laura Randall, Special to The Times
The concierge at Shelter Pointe Hotel and Marina laughed when I sought his counsel on parking for an outdoor concert down the street. Noting that my tickets for that night's Wynton Marsalis show were pricey at $63.50 apiece, I wanted to know how to avoid additional fees. "There is no bad seat at Humphrey's," he said, referring to the Humphrey's Concerts by the Bay arena on San Diego's Shelter Island. He pointed out that concert parking was free in lots across the street.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Nancy Kinsey Needham
Our cruise to Hawaii on the Celebrity Millennium began with saying goodbye to our ship docked in San Diego Harbor and taking a  bus ride to Ensenada, Mexico , to meet it again. An act of Congress made it illegal for us to board our Malta-flagged ship in the United States because our destination was another U.S. port.  The Jones Act, a 1920 maritime law, is commonly blamed for prohibiting foreign-flagged vessels from carrying passengers between two U.S. ports, without calling at a distant foreign port along the way. The restriction on transporting passengers actually originated from an 1886 law that is now called Chapter 551, Coastwise Trade of Title 46, Shipping, United States Code.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2008 | Tony Perry
The aircraft carrier George Washington, bound from Norfolk, Va., to Japan, pulled into San Diego Harbor on Tuesday for a damage assessment and repairs after a fire May 22 that damaged several areas and trapped four sailors for more than four hours. One sailor suffered first-degree burns, and 23 others were treated for heat stress, officials said. "Instinct took over, our training kicked in, everything was done expeditiously," senior chief damage control officer Dwight Hill said of the firefighting and rescue efforts.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
Two Soviet navy ships and a supply vessel sailed into San Diego Bay today to begin a five-day goodwill visit in the first West Coast stopover by Soviet warships. The sailors aboard the Soviet ships stood at attention as the vessels glided to the pier at the 32nd Street Naval Station. Sailors on three U.S. ships also stood at attention as they watched their Soviet counterparts navigate San Diego Harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1988 | JANE FRITSCH
The U.S. Coast Guard seized a 45-foot fishing boat off the coast of San Diego Wednesday after finding a small quantity of illegal drugs on board, authorities said. The boat, the commercial gill netter Lococo Brothers, was the third seized in a week off the Southern California shore under the federal "zero tolerance" drug crackdown. A Coast Guard boarding team operating off a Navy ship found the drugs shortly before 10 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990
About 450 gallons of lubricating oil spilled from the U.S. aircraft carrier Independence on Sunday, according to a North Island Naval Air Station spokesman. The accident occurred about 11 a.m. at the North Island carrier pier in San Diego Harbor, said Ken Mitchell, public affairs officer for the station, which conducted the spill cleanup. The aircraft carrier is attached to the U.S. Pacific fleet.
NEWS
February 24, 1987
The Coast Guard tried in vain to find the owner of a 26-foot pleasure craft that washed ashore near Vandenberg Air Force Base without any sign of life. "We've got a couple of leads but they're just not panning out in terms of locating someone," said a spokesman from the Coast Guard in Long Beach. The boat, registered at San Diego Harbor, was discovered by guards at the base, about 140 miles northwest of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2008 | Tony Perry
The aircraft carrier George Washington, bound from Norfolk, Va., to Japan, pulled into San Diego Harbor on Tuesday for a damage assessment and repairs after a fire May 22 that damaged several areas and trapped four sailors for more than four hours. One sailor suffered first-degree burns, and 23 others were treated for heat stress, officials said. "Instinct took over, our training kicked in, everything was done expeditiously," senior chief damage control officer Dwight Hill said of the firefighting and rescue efforts.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Nancy Kinsey Needham
Our cruise to Hawaii on the Celebrity Millennium began with saying goodbye to our ship docked in San Diego Harbor and taking a  bus ride to Ensenada, Mexico , to meet it again. An act of Congress made it illegal for us to board our Malta-flagged ship in the United States because our destination was another U.S. port.  The Jones Act, a 1920 maritime law, is commonly blamed for prohibiting foreign-flagged vessels from carrying passengers between two U.S. ports, without calling at a distant foreign port along the way. The restriction on transporting passengers actually originated from an 1886 law that is now called Chapter 551, Coastwise Trade of Title 46, Shipping, United States Code.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2007 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
READING "Love and War in California," Oakley Hall's latest in a long line of engaging novels, is like catching one last glimpse of San Diego and its glistening harbor the moment the sun disappears with a green flash below the horizon. You see the line of hills forming a backdrop to the newer towers with their glittery lights, and looking toward the beach, the now-ancient angles of the Hotel del Coronado emerge sharply against the darkening sky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Port Commission has joined a growing list of agencies in California that ban smoking at parks and beaches. No-smoking signs will soon be posted at beaches, 17 parks and fishing piers along San Diego Bay. All five cities represented by the Port District have approved smoking bans at parks or beaches, as have other cities in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Deep in the bleak, gray bowels of this Navy ship docked at Pearl Harbor, the sound of cheerful, light laughter began to bounce off the cavernous walls of the hangar deck. Gone were most of the helicopters and Harrier jets. They were replaced by decorations and welcome signs. Sailors brought aboard 16 roasted kalua pigs, in preparation for a Hawaiian luau on board. The Tarawa had just spent a grueling seven months at sea, one month longer than scheduled.
TRAVEL
July 11, 2004 | Laura Randall, Special to The Times
The concierge at Shelter Pointe Hotel and Marina laughed when I sought his counsel on parking for an outdoor concert down the street. Noting that my tickets for that night's Wynton Marsalis show were pricey at $63.50 apiece, I wanted to know how to avoid additional fees. "There is no bad seat at Humphrey's," he said, referring to the Humphrey's Concerts by the Bay arena on San Diego's Shelter Island. He pointed out that concert parking was free in lots across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Superior Court jury has awarded the port district more than $21.3 million in a lease dispute with Ryan Aeronautical, a former tenant whose owner abandoned a property near the city airport. Ryan, a wholly owned subsidiary of Pittsburgh-based TDY Industries, began leasing 1.9 million square feet of buildings and property from the San Diego Unified Port District in October 1984. In May 1999, most of Ryan's assets were sold and TDY arranged three subleases, all rejected by the port.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego and Avalon would be the big winners if Congress changes an arcane federal law that forbids foreign cruise ships from calling at two U.S. ports in a row, according to a study commissioned by the California Trade and Commerce Agency's Division of Tourism. Legislation is pending in the U.S. Senate to amend the 111-year-old Passenger Services Act--which was originally intended to protect U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990 | JOHN D. CRAMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old fisherman died in the spring, and his son and grandson agree on one thing: San Diego harbor without a Zolezzi-family tuna-fishing boat would have broken the old man's heart. Once a thriving tuna-fishing community, the harbor has only a handful of tuna vessels left. John Zolezzi, who was 81 when he died in April, was a believer in the family tradition. He never would have believed this. "He'd probably be glad not to be around to see it," said John Zolezzi III.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1991
San Diego needs a new central library; the current one is a disgrace. On that point, there's agreement. There's less agreement on where to put it. Mayor Maureen O'Connor, to her credit, has shown leadership in trying to build momentum for this important and overdue project. Her proposal for a central library on Port District property along the San Diego harbor front would eliminate substantial land costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One commissioned officer, 18 soldiers and a dog named Bozo were responsible for defending San Diego's coast at Fort Rosecrans in 1935. Six years later, when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, San Diego's coastal defenders were greater in number but scarcely more ready. Within the county, several thousand troops were poised at the north and at the south to protect against inland invaders. But shoddy equipment left the coast largely unprotected--U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|