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San Diego Museum Of Art

ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2002 | SCARLET CHENG
History is attached to the back of major paintings--small tags identify the artist and the title, of course, but additional labels from museums and art galleries record where and when these works have been shown, a kind of art-world pedigree. In a long gallery at the San Diego Museum of Art, freshly painted in off-white and balmy sky blue for its next exhibition, only a few works have been hung, while several dozen sit vertically on padded carts.
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NEWS
April 25, 2002 | KATHY BRYANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Catalyzing Community: Perspectives on Revitalization of the Inner City," a panel discussion with James Bonar of Skid Row Housing Trust, Anita Landecker of Excellent Education Ltd., Eric Owen Moss of SCI-Arc and Dan Rosenfeld of Urban Partners LLC, moderated by Francis Anderton of KCRW, will take place at 7 tonight at the Architecture + Design Museum, 304 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. Information: (213) 620-9961.
NEWS
January 10, 2002
Last Chance Theater "Flower Drum Song"--Totalitarian repression, cheesecake and Lea Salonga: These were the primary ingredients of the pop gruel known as "Miss Saigon." The ingredients were recombined for a new dish, "Flower Drum Song" (although Jennifer Paz took over the role during the run at the Taper). A few tons shy of a mega-musical--no fake helicopter here, no power ballads saccharine enough to stop communism dead in its tracks--it's a raffishly entertaining response to the 1958 original.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2001 | LEAH OLLMAN, Leah Ollman writes about art and culture
The mystique that hangs so heavily around the figure of Rembrandt was, to some extent, of his own design. He played up his humble origins and cultivated a reputation as a renegade. He lived high, when he could, and died cash-poor. Questions of attribution clouded his work even in his own day, making its value and authenticity slippery matters of continual debate. His art, on the other hand, has never been much concerned with mystery and intrigue. It's about the real thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2001
* "Charlie Victor Romeo," a dramatic work derived entirely from real "black box" transcripts of major airplane crashes, has its West Coast premiere, playing June 27 to July 15 at UCLA's Macgowan Little Theater in Westwood. $35. (310) 825-2101.* "Hamlet" kicks off the fifth annual Kingsmen Shakespeare Festival, playing June 29 to July 22 at California Lutheran University, 60 W. Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks. Free. (805) 493-3455.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2001 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's hard to believe, as you shuffle through a crowded (what other kind is there?) show of Impressionist painting, that Impressionism was born of defiance, as a circumvention of the system. It was an exhilarating snub of academic standards, which, in late 19th century Europe, meant tight draftsmanship, high finish and, preferably, subject matter of some historical or literary import.
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