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BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | From Reuters
Big oil companies are under attack in San Diego County, where motorists pay some of the highest prices for gasoline in the continental United States. The county wants to cut prices and spur competition by introducing an ordinance that would give service station managers more options when they buy gasoline for their pumps. Under the ordinance, the state's six biggest oil companies would be barred from setting prices at retail stations they own in the county. They are Atlantic Richfield Co.
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NEWS
March 30, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council, caught between animal lovers and beach devotees, rejected a move Monday to oust harbor seals from the beach at the venerable Children's Pool in La Jolla. Instead, the council ordered that barriers be built to protect the more than 140 seals from harassment by humans. Lifeguards will most likely use ropes and traffic cones to shield the seals; nonetheless, humans will continue to be barred from swimming.
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NEWS
January 11, 1993 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suddenly this conservative and often strait-laced city is center stage in the clash between gay rights and the Boy Scouts of America. It began last summer when a police officer from suburban El Cajon was dismissed as a Boy Scout leader when it was learned he is gay. The national policy of the Boy Scouts prohibits gays from being Scout leaders on the belief that gays are inappropriate role models.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | From Reuters
Big oil companies are under attack in San Diego County, where motorists pay some of the highest prices for gasoline in the continental United States. The county wants to cut prices and spur competition by introducing an ordinance that would give service station managers more options when they buy gasoline for their pumps. Under the ordinance, the state's six biggest oil companies would be barred from setting prices at retail stations they own in the county. They are Atlantic Richfield Co.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A tough San Diego curfew law banning youths from hanging out in public after 10 p.m. is unconstitutional because it's too broad, too vague and interferes with parents' rights to raise their children as they choose, an appeals court ruled Monday. The decision could gut similar curfew ordinances in dozens of cities, according to Jan Scanlan, a deputy city attorney for Bakersfield who organized a coalition of 114 cities to urge the court to uphold the San Diego law.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The letter from the San Diego Police Department arrived in Benito Hernandez's mailbox last week. Others in Hernandez's business--currency-exchange houses, or casas de cambio-- also received the correspondence in recent days. Many did not like what they read: A new city law will require the city's money-exchange houses, mostly concentrated in the U.S.-Mexico border community of San Ysidro, to comply with a host of new regulations, including police licensing and supervision.
NEWS
September 19, 1995 | From a Times staff writer
After spirited protests by high school students, the city attorney Monday announced that fund-raising carwashes by students and other nonprofit groups are exempt from a rule meant to keep soapsuds out of storm drains. The ruling by City Atty. John Witt ends a mini-controversy that flared when a city official sent a letter to the school superintendent requesting that such carwashes be curtailed, lest the runoff pollute the ocean and Mission Bay.
SPORTS
February 11, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The San Diego City Council approved an ordinance making it a misdemeanor to smoke at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium, home of the San Diego Padres, San Diego Chargers and San Diego State football team, at any time. The law is scheduled to take effect the day before the Padres open their 1992 season.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | JIM NEWTON
The campaign cash transfers that helped elect Don R. Roth to the Board of Supervisors and Robert L. Richardson to the Santa Ana City Council were legal in Orange County, but the same technique has been outlawed by some local governments. In San Diego, for instance, all such transfers have long been illegal under that city's rigorous campaign ordinance, which limits all contributions to $250 and mandates that they come only from individuals.
NEWS
February 10, 1988
San Diegans with AIDS and AIDS-related complex will soon be able to sue landlords, businesses and employers who discriminate against them for potentially large punitive damages as a result of a new city ordinance. The law, approved by an 8-1 City Council vote, makes it illegal to deny housing, employment, and business and government services to people diagnosed with or suspected of having acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1997
Freedom of speech and religion may soon be sufficient reasons for Long Beach youths to stay out late. Reacting to a recent federal court ruling, the City Council this week unanimously approved the first reading of a new ordinance that would relax Long Beach's existing nighttime curfew for minors. Under the new law, which still must be approved at a second reading next week, minors would be able to stay out past 10 p.m. if they are attending a political rally or religious services.
NEWS
June 19, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council, stung by a federal court ruling last week striking down its tough curfew law, passed a less restrictive emergency ordinance Wednesday that still ensures that police can arrest teenagers found in public after 10 p.m. The legal fight between San Diego and the ACLU over its curfew law has been closely monitored by the dozens of other cities with curfew laws, but it remains unclear whether the council's unanimous action will end the fight or merely lead to another round.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A tough San Diego curfew law banning youths from hanging out in public after 10 p.m. is unconstitutional because it's too broad, too vague and interferes with parents' rights to raise their children as they choose, an appeals court ruled Monday. While all 31 Orange County cities have curfew ordinances of some sort, mostly affecting teens under 18, it was not clear Monday whether the ruling will affect them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997 | SCOTT HADLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appeals court decision striking down a tough San Diego youth curfew will probably not affect similar limits on nighttime carousing for those under 18 in Ventura County, local officials said. But city attorneys across the county are studying the opinion handed down Monday, nonetheless. In its decision, the U.S.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Monday upheld San Diego's nighttime curfew for teenagers, one of the strictest and most vigorously enforced curfews in the nation. Judge Marilyn L. Huff ruled that an ordinance that, with few exceptions, orders teenagers off the streets at 10 p.m. is constitutional. The curfew had been on the books since 1947 but was sporadically enforced until the City Council ordered it applied rigorously two years ago as a way to fight crime.
NEWS
September 19, 1995 | From a Times staff writer
After spirited protests by high school students, the city attorney Monday announced that fund-raising carwashes by students and other nonprofit groups are exempt from a rule meant to keep soapsuds out of storm drains. The ruling by City Atty. John Witt ends a mini-controversy that flared when a city official sent a letter to the school superintendent requesting that such carwashes be curtailed, lest the runoff pollute the ocean and Mission Bay.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
The City Council adopted an interim ordinance Tuesday that would reduce by almost 50% the number of residential dwellings that could be constructed in the state's second-largest city during the next year. After listening to 7 1/2 hours of public testimony and debate, the council voted 8 to 1 to permit developers to build only 8,000 dwellings in the next year, a sharp reduction from the 15,000 units constructed in 1986, when low interest rates fueled record construction.
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