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NEWS
June 13, 1994 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What a difference a decade makes. Ten years ago Dist. Atty. Edwin L. Miller Jr. was in headlong prosecutorial pursuit of Mayor Roger Hedgecock, a battle that raged daily in the courts and the media. Miller emerged triumphant and Hedgecock was ousted from office, protesting that he was the victim of a vendetta by his political enemies, Miller and the press.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - Councilman and mayoral candidate David Alvarez stood and applauded when acting Mayor Todd Gloria, in his state of the city address, proposed raising the minimum wage in San Diego beyond the scheduled statewide increases. Councilman Kevin Faulconer, Alvarez's opponent in the Feb. 11 election, remained seated, hands folded in his lap. He later told reporters that raising the minimum wage could be bad for business and lead to elimination of jobs. Differences over economic issues illustrate the divide between Alvarez, a Democrat, and Faulconer, a Republican, as the hurry-up campaign to find a successor to the disgraced Bob Filner enters its final stretch with prickly debates and dueling TV commercials.
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NEWS
February 11, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The morning commute is underway and radio personalities Joe Bauer and Mac Hudson, faithful barometers of the local zeitgeist, are gagging it up about Bruce Henderson, the designated villain in the red-hot controversy that threatens to drive the Super Bowl and the Chargers out of town. Bauer: "Let's talk about how proud Bruce Henderson must be today because the Holiday Bowl may skip San Diego as well. Good work, Bruce."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
This city is not known for civic toughness. Politically two-fisted cities like New York and Chicago, definitely. Los Angeles, maybe. But San Diego, sun-drenched, image-conscious, tourist-friendly, zoo- and SeaWorld-centric San Diego? No way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1988 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
In the midst of his 1984 reelection campaign, then-San Diego Mayor Roger Hedgecock was engulfed in the kind of serious political trouble that normally attracts opponents the way a slab of bloody meat draws a school of hungry sharks. With Hedgecock facing local and state investigations into campaign finance violations that ultimately drove him from office in December, 1985, numerous local officeholders contemplated a mayoral candidacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2003 | Tony Perry and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers
Fire prevention has emerged as the dominant political issue as officials trade accusations over whether runaway growth and a lack of firefighting resources had left the county vulnerable to the disastrous fires.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversy over the $78-million expansion plan for San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium ratcheted up a notch this week when city officials moved closer to scheduling a public vote on a referendum aimed at halting the expansion. But whether that referendum will involve the full plan for the publicly owned stadium or just $18 million of the project will be determined by the courts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1985 | TOM GREELEY, Times Staff Writer
More than any other San Diego politician in the last decade, Roger Hedgecock engendered passionate feelings of love from his legions of supporters and hate from his enemies, and those emotions poured forth Wednesday after the mayor's conviction on perjury and conspiracy charges. At 1:37 p.m.
OPINION
July 24, 2005 | Steve P. Erie, Steve P. Erie, a professor of political science at UC San Diego, is the author of "Beyond 'Chinatown': The Metropolitan Water District, Growth, and the Environment in Southern California."
San Diego's sunshine has turned noir. Lauded as one of the nation's best-governed cities in the late 1990s, America's self-proclaimed "Finest City" now has the reputation of being among the most poorly managed.
OPINION
July 24, 2005 | Steve P. Erie, Steve P. Erie, a professor of political science at UC San Diego, is the author of "Beyond 'Chinatown': The Metropolitan Water District, Growth, and the Environment in Southern California."
San Diego's sunshine has turned noir. Lauded as one of the nation's best-governed cities in the late 1990s, America's self-proclaimed "Finest City" now has the reputation of being among the most poorly managed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2005 | Maria L. La Ganga and Tony Perry, Times Staff Writers
One local television station this week banned use of San Diego's longtime slogan -- "America's Finest City" -- until further notice, deeming it too "arrogant and cynical" for a municipality in the throes of national humiliation. The local paper raised the editorial question Thursday: "Can San Diego sink any lower in the eyes of the world?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2005 | Tony Perry and Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writers
Mayor Dick Murphy, who won a disputed election five months ago, abruptly announced his resignation Monday amid mounting criticism of his handling of the city's pension deficit and threats of a recall. Murphy read a short statement and took no questions. "It is clear the city needs a fresh start," the 62-year-old Republican and former Superior Court judge said at a hastily called news conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2003 | Tony Perry and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers
Fire prevention has emerged as the dominant political issue as officials trade accusations over whether runaway growth and a lack of firefighting resources had left the county vulnerable to the disastrous fires.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a baseball manager arguing nose to nose with an umpire, much of this city is furious at Bruce Henderson. If City Hall, the Chamber of Commerce and the local newspaper could spit tobacco juice, the shoes of the former city councilman turned serial litigator would be covered in glop. At issue is Henderson's relentless opposition to the voter-approved plan to build a ballpark for the San Diego Padres as the centerpiece of the largest downtown redevelopment project in city history.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a season of cynicism, San Diego voters are picking a new mayor, and the issue of honesty in high office has pushed aside the concerns about crime and urban sprawl that have dominated previous mayoral campaigns. On the strength of a squeaky-clean image, Superior Court Judge Dick Murphy appears to be running dead even with, or possibly even a few points ahead of, county Supervisor Ron Roberts, according to polling done for local radio and television stations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1991 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego's four district-only City Council campaigns this year could be the briefest, least expensive races in recent political history. Each of the four incumbents seeking reelection--Ron Roberts, Wes Pratt, Bruce Henderson and Bob Filner--faces only one major opponent in the Sept. 17 primary.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Little more than a year ago, political consultant Nick Johnson half-jokingly described San Diego elections as being "usually about as unpredictable as elections in Russia." "If you're an incumbent here, it's like being on the Communist Party ticket in Russia or East Germany," the Democratic consultant said. "You're that safe." Today, Johnson's comparison is perhaps even more apt than when he made it, though for reasons he scarcely could have imagined.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A big-money attempt by local business leaders to influence a San Diego school board election has turned a normally quiet race into a debate over the role of money in local politics. Frances Zimmerman, a dissident San Diego Unified School District trustee opposed to reforms instituted by Supt. Alan Bersin, has been targeted by a newly formed group called the Partnership for Student Achievement.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every city agonizes over big civic building projects. But this sunny metropolis has perfected the art of government by indecision, litigation and political risk aversion. Just ask Larry Lucchino, president and co-owner of the San Diego Padres. He's still puzzling over how differently the game of politics is played in his adopted San Diego than in his native Pittsburgh.
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