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NEWS
June 13, 1995 | States News Service
San Diego's chances for saving $1.5 billion in sewage treatment costs took a big step forward Monday when regulators announced "preliminary approval" on waiving certain federal wastewater-treatment requirements. The move has been years in the making, said Rep. Bob Filner (D-Chula Vista), who along with Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), pushed legislation through Congress last year that allowed San Diego to petition for a waiver from provisions of the Clean Water Act.
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NEWS
July 26, 1995 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first "corrections day" action, the House Tuesday passed a bill giving San Diego a permanent exemption from having to upgrade its sewage treatment plant. The measure allows the city to continue pumping treated sewage through an outfall pipe 4 1/2 miles out in the Pacific Ocean, rather than spend more than $2 billion to abide by stricter federal clean-water rules that call for building a secondary treatment plant.
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NEWS
April 2, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle has raged for 23 years--the last seven of them in a federal courtroom. The players are a city hoping to avoid billions of dollars in capital expenditures; an environmental group sounding a warning cry about years of pollution, and the U.S. government trying to enforce the strict standards of the Clean Water Act.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | States News Service
San Diego's chances for saving $1.5 billion in sewage treatment costs took a big step forward Monday when regulators announced "preliminary approval" on waiving certain federal wastewater-treatment requirements. The move has been years in the making, said Rep. Bob Filner (D-Chula Vista), who along with Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), pushed legislation through Congress last year that allowed San Diego to petition for a waiver from provisions of the Clean Water Act.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
State water pollution officials on Wednesday proposed an unprecedented $1.5-million fine against the City of San Diego for a Thanksgiving Day spill of 1.5 million gallons of raw sewage into an environmentally sensitive lagoon. The penalty recommended by the staff of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board is believed by state officials to be the largest ever proposed. The second largest was a $646,800 fine imposed on San Diego last year after a 4.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first "corrections day" action, the House Tuesday passed a bill giving San Diego a permanent exemption from having to upgrade its sewage treatment plant. The measure allows the city to continue pumping treated sewage through an outfall pipe 4 1/2 miles out in the Pacific Ocean, rather than spend more than $2 billion to abide by stricter federal clean-water rules that call for building a secondary treatment plant.
NEWS
October 31, 1986
Four Navy civilian painters were electrocuted this morning when a scaffolding tilted and touched high-tension electrical wires at the San Diego Submarine Base, a Navy spokesman said. A fifth person was critically injured in the accident and flown by helicopter to the University of California San Diego Medical Center. "(The scaffolding) was pushed into the wires," the spokesman said. "It tipped, tilted . . . and the scaffolding touched the wires, setting off the electrocutions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts by the San Diego County Public Works Department to expand the San Marcos landfill in quick fashion--and sidestep an immediate garbage crisis--remained intact Monday after a Superior Court ruling. Though Judge Judith McConnell ruled that the county must still fix a flawed environmental impact report that was to have paved the way for the landfill to be expanded, she didn't specifically order that an entirely new EIR be completed--a process that would have delayed the expansion by a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1988 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Six years ago, Hildegarde Haskell moved from San Francisco to an apartment in Beachwood Canyon in the Hollywood Hills. Friends said she never really adjusted to sprawling Los Angeles. It was too hard to get around on foot. And all that traffic. Sometimes she would wait five minutes to cross Beachwood Drive to mail a letter. Last week, the 77-year-old woman and an elderly friend were killed as they walked across Beachwood on their way to dinner at the friend's house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2007 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Ash from wildfires in Southern California's residential neighborhoods poses a serious threat to people and ecosystems because it is extremely caustic and contains high levels of arsenic, lead and other toxic metals, according to a study by federal geologists released Tuesday. U.S. Geological Survey scientists warned that rainstorms, which are forecast for the region beginning Friday, are likely to wash the dangerous substances into waterways, polluting streams and threatening wildlife.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle has raged for 23 years--the last seven of them in a federal courtroom. The players are a city hoping to avoid billions of dollars in capital expenditures; an environmental group sounding a warning cry about years of pollution, and the U.S. government trying to enforce the strict standards of the Clean Water Act.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
State water pollution officials on Wednesday proposed an unprecedented $1.5-million fine against the City of San Diego for a Thanksgiving Day spill of 1.5 million gallons of raw sewage into an environmentally sensitive lagoon. The penalty recommended by the staff of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board is believed by state officials to be the largest ever proposed. The second largest was a $646,800 fine imposed on San Diego last year after a 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1989 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only one arm of the Navy is prepared to provide electricity to a docked destroyer, exterminate cockroaches in 6,800 San Diego military homes, pave roads or rent red, white and blue bunting. As the maintenance crew of the Navy, the Public Works Center expects none of the spotlight that occasionally bathes its more glamorous brethren who man the ships and fly the planes. But in recent months, the Navy center has been in the news. And it hasn't been good.
NEWS
January 29, 1985 | PAT BRENNAN, Times Staff Writer
"Here Lies John McRae; He died defending His Right-of-Way. " --Inscription on tombstone paperweight at Los Angeles Department of Transportation When city officials refused last June to repaint a crosswalk outside an Alhambra convalescent home for the elderly, the hospital's director was furious. "It's a total hazard," Cheryl Brykman, director of the Brykirk Extended Care Hospital, said of the unmarked intersection at the corner of Valley Boulevard and Primrose Avenue.
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