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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
San Diego Symphony officials announced Tuesday that orchestra management and players have a new two-year contract to replace the contract that expired on Sept. 30. The symphony's executive board approved the new contract Monday night, after a positive vote by the players last Thursday. The contract provides for modest increases in the players' weekly base salary and adds one more week of performance in the contract's second year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO -- All seems calm around this city. Fires have raged and subsided. The air is fresh. Restaurants and bars, beaches and parks, are full. But once more nature has asserted herself over man. The excuse for sluggish service at a downtown cafe is that the sushi chef is still pretty shook up. Concert halls over the weekend were also full. Saturday night, the La Jolla Symphony began a new season under a surprising new music director, the percussionist Steven Schick.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite the San Diego Symphony's newfound fiscal stability, the players' wages remain at the low end of the scale for U.S. symphony orchestras. As some of the more ambitious players take positions with better-paying orchestras in Los Angeles and San Francisco, their ranks are filled with younger recruits. Rodney Mack, a 23-year-old musician from New Orleans and recent graduate of Philadelphia's Curtiss School of Music, just joined the San Diego Symphony as assistant principal trumpet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
This is a city that knows how to have fun. Some of the local entertainment is highbrow (the Old Globe Theatre, the San Diego Symphony). Most is profoundly family-friendly (Sea World and the San Diego Zoo). But for two weekends each year, the city is devoted to fun that is neither highbrow nor housebroken for family consumption: the beach bacchanal Over-the-Line, a beer-fueled nudity fest on city-owned Fiesta Island in Mission Bay.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1986 | HILLIARD HARPER
The "new era" for the San Diego Symphony, which teetered on the brink of bankruptcy last week, turned sour for the musicians Tuesday when they learned that management still plans to hit them with a 19% pay cut for the rest of the season. At issue is a labor contract signed almost three years ago. It called for increases in pay of $5 a week the first two years but a jump of $27 a week this year, plus an increase in the length of the season from 38 to 45 weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1986 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
As a last-minute reprieve for the bankruptcy-bound San Diego Symphony, the City Council has discussed extending an unprecedented letter of credit to the orchestra so it can borrow money to cover its operating deficit. Four council members and a San Diego Chamber of Commerce official said Wednesday the letter of credit has been discussed as a "last resort" if private fund-raising efforts this week are not enough to erase the symphony's $1.8-million debt.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the brow of San Diego Symphony music director Yoav Talmi appears furrowed these days, it's not due to musical problems. Keeping the horns on pitch or the violins together is the easy part of his conducting duties. Dealing with the war in Tel Aviv, where Talmi and his family reside, and the economy in San Diego, which has deflated symphony attendance, has put an unexpected cloud over the conductor's inaugural year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
The San Diego Symphony was the orchestra, David Atherton the conductor and John Lill the pianist at the annual Tchaikovsky Spectacular in the Hollywood Bowl, over the weekend. Although all three were making Bowl debuts, not a lot was new in this 18th edition of the traditional music-and-fireworks program. Near-capacity crowds--counted at 17,770 Friday night and 17,796 Saturday--again attended the yearly ritual. Three-quarters of the program might have been predicted.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1994 | TONY PERRY
Because of outrage in Mexico over Proposition 187, the Tijuana Cultural Center has canceled a scheduled joint concert Friday in Tijuana between the San Diego Symphony Orchestra and the Baja Orchestra. Rather than let the event die, however, the San Diego Symphony has rescheduled the joint concert, to feature a Mexican version of "Romeo and Juliet," to Copley Symphony Hall in downtown San Diego on the same night.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
As guest conductor of the San Diego Symphony over the weekend, Catherine Comet displayed how a strong leader and stylish music-maker can be another example of the fickleness of musical fate: how some careers blossom and others seem only to wait.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Although Oakland is a town that knows a thing or two about murder -- it has more per capita than most -- it's back from the dead. So, too, is sunny San Diego. That is to say, the Oakland East Bay Symphony and the San Diego Symphony, orchestras reborn from the ashes of bankruptcies, are now among the symphonic living.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
And now there's Nuvi, the next Mehta. Cousin of Zubin, son of pianist Dady, brother of countertenor Bejun, the youngest member of the Mehta musical dynasty has been making a name for himself in the San Diego area as a violinist (he performs in the San Diego Symphony), conductor, stage director, educator and even occasional performer in musical comedy. He is also music director of two regional orchestras (the Nova Vista Symphony in Sunnyvale, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The chief administrator of the San Diego Symphony has resigned, citing uncertainties caused by his negotiations to become managing director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Douglas Gerhart, 44, the symphony's president and chief executive, resigned Monday from his $200,000-a-year job. Orchestra Chairman Harold B. Domko Jr. said Gerhart's negotiations with Pittsburgh had created uncertainty at San Diego's oldest musical institution.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2003 | Chris Pasles
Douglas Gerhart, president and chief executive of the San Diego Symphony since 2000, has emerged as the top candidate to lead the Pittsburgh Symphony as managing director-chief executive, according to reports in Pittsburgh and San Diego. Gerhart, who came to San Diego from the Alabama Symphony in Birmingham, completed a three-year contract last month that reportedly paid him $200,000 annually.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2003 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
The San Diego Symphony confirmed recent rumors Friday when it announced that Indonesian-born conductor Jahja Ling, 51, will become the orchestra's new music director beginning in September 2004. Ling, who was born in Jakarta of Chinese descent, served as guest conductor with the orchestra in January. His appointment culminates a two-year international search to find a replacement for Jung-Ho Pak, who resigned the post in March 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2003 | Scott Timberg
The San Diego Symphony isn't commenting, but word is that the orchestra has named Jahja Ling, a 51-year-old Indonesian-born conductor, as its next music director. "We don't have anything to announce at this time," symphony spokesman Stephen Kougias said Tuesday, declining to speculate when an announcement might come. Would he deny the rumors? "No comment." Kougias was responding to a story in the San Diego Union-Tribune that in careful terms reported Ling's imminent hire.
TRAVEL
March 9, 2003 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
We had left L.A. on Interstate 5 and were near- ing Encinitas when the weekend really started going south. The idea that had put us in the fast lane was modest enough: To check out the new W Hotel in San Diego and sample the surge of sophisticated high life said to be overtaking that city's core.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2002 | SCOTT TIMBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Stuart DeSilva, an arts philanthropist who launched the Stuart Collection of sculpture at UC San Diego, died of a stroke Sept. 12 at his home in Rancho Santa Fe. He was 83. A Miami native who owned canneries and a tuna fishing fleet, the businessman had lived in the San Diego area since 1971.
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