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San Diego Symphony

ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1990 | GERARD GARZA, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
You know that uneasy feeling of having something hanging over your head? Like a late tax return. Or some repairs around the house. Or a debt. The management at the San Diego Symphony knows that feeling. It had a $4.4-million debt hovering about--the amount still owed from the 1984 purchase and renovation of the 1929-era Fox Theater as the symphony's permanent home. But on Jan. 25, the symphony called a press conference to make a stunning announcement. An anonymous donor had made a $2.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER, San Diego County Arts Writer
The San Diego Symphony pushed its attendance and ticket sales up a notch during the just-closed 1989 winter season, a symphony spokesman said Wednesday. Average concert attendance grew from 68% to 71% of capacity in the 2,250-seat Symphony Hall. The number of concerts increased to 57, up from 51 in 1988. Although ticket sales grew from $1.15 million to $1.27 million, they fell $120,000 shy of the projected $1.39 million, symphony spokesman Les Smith said. "We're about 92% of budget (in ticket sales)
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The San Diego Symphony received a $2.5-million gift from an anonymous benefactor. Symphonyofficials said the donation, coupled with the forgiveness of almost $2 million in bank loans, allows the orchestra to retire its $4.4-million capital deficit, the last remnant of the debt incurred in the purchase of Symphony Hall in 1984. In forgiving the debt, a consortium of banks headed by Bank of America required that the symphony retain ownership of the auditorium for 10 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
Back in the heyday of magazine advertising, the slogan for a self-teaching piano course boomed, "They laughed when I sat down at the piano." When Heather Buchman actually sits down to play her trombone, no one laughs. But, when she mentions her profession at a casual social gathering, guffaws are not unusual. Buchman is not merely a professional trombone player; the 23-year-old Canton, Ohio, native is the San Diego Symphony's new principal trombone.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1987 | KENNETH HERMAN
Getting the San Diego Symphony in shape to play again might not be as challenging as raising the Titanic, but symphony management has been scrambling over the last month to fill 15 vacant positions. The empty chairs ranged throughout the orchestra, from the all-important post of concertmaster to nearly all of the first-chair strings and half of the viola section. For the orchestra's Symphony Hall season opener on Friday, its first concert there since June, 1986, Executive Director Wesley O.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
Since opening night at the San Diego Symphony turned into a music marathon, it was no small consolation to depart Symphony Hall with the grand, stentorian fanfares of Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony still echoing in the lobby. When guest conductor Leopold Hager's program was first announced, it was a pleasantly, albeit predictably, balanced offering of a Verdi Overture, Mendelssohn's Concerto for Two Pianos, and the Sibelius Second Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1987 | HILLIARD HARPER, Times Staff Writer
The current busy schedule of the San Diego Symphony's musicians belies the traumatic events of the orchestra's recent past. This week the 81-member orchestra is actually working two schedules: While a 32-member ensemble will perform four of J. S. Bach's "Brandenburg" Concertos at a pair of chamber music concerts, most of the musicians are playing "The Nutcracker" with the visiting San Francisco Ballet. The scene is sharply different from a year ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With worries about settling a new contract between players and management behind him, San Diego Symphony Music Director Yoav Talmi can devote all his attention to his primary concern: the orchestra's musical development. When he leads the symphony in tonight's season-opening concert of Beethoven and Chopin, it will mark his second year as music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1992 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Devoting an evening to Russian Romantic music is as traditional a SummerPops feature as the ubiquitous popping of champagne corks. In lesser hands, the Russian theme is an excuse for bombast and melodic bathos. Fortunately, Jack Everly does not leave his good taste at home when he conducts the San Diego Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Equal parts Lazarus and Tchaikovsky, the San Diego Symphony is set to resume making music today after 2 1/2 years of artistic silence, bankruptcy, legal wrangling and political maneuvering aimed at reviving the city's oldest artistic organization. The orchestra--known in recent decades as a musical winner and a financial flop--returns with a series of pops concerts laden with sure-fire favorites and staged at the picturesque Navy Pier in downtown San Diego.
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