Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Diego Trolley
IN THE NEWS

San Diego Trolley

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newest San Diego Trolley extension was inaugurated Thursday in a ceremony that included a giant red ribbon, a jazz band, lots of pizza and plenty of promises that, with good transit, comes neighborhood revitalization. The cause for celebration is the half a mile stretch of track along the rail right of way from the Santa Fe Depot to Cedar Street. The segment, funded by the county and the Unified Port District, was built by the Metropolitan Transit Development Board.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
October 28, 2001 | HOLLY OCASIO RIZZO, Holly Ocasio Rizzo is a freelance writer based in Orange County
No vehicle deserves a break more than my little red pickup truck. In 15 years it has ferried me safely over 271,000 miles of the planet. So it was pure joy to check the truck into the parking garage at the Bristol San Diego hotel for a weekend last month. This not only gave it a rest, but also left me and my companion, Marc, free to explore the city by trolley, using minimal shoe leather. The San Diego Trolley first carried passengers in 1981.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1987 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Langley Powell is obsessed with graffiti. It is his enemy. He wants to see it eradicated forever, wiped from the part of the world he rules as general manager of the San Diego Trolley. If there is a quicker way to remove it, a better method of covering it, a more impregnable surface that can be applied to shelter walls and trolley cars, Powell will try it. At stake is the public image and ridership of a transit line that he claims is one of the cleanest in the country.
NEWS
February 28, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Devon Allen, who is 9 years old and had been waiting for this day for two long years, pronounced judgment as the first Coaster rolled into Santa Fe Depot at 6:32 a.m. Monday: "It feels like you're airborne." Hailed as a great leap forward in the effort to persuade Southern Californians to forsake their cars for mass transit, the Coaster rail commute line was 10 years in the planning and building and has cost $150 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1989 | IGOR GREENWALD, Times Staff Writer
The latest extension of the San Diego Trolley's East Line--connecting the Spring Street station in La Mesa with the El Cajon Transit Center--will go into service Saturday with a Community Ride Day. Metropolitan Transit Development Board administrators and local officials plan to inaugurate the six-mile segment with a ribbon-cutting ceremony today. The new track completes the $108-million, 11.1-mile East Line extension. "MTDB is extremely pleased to expand the San Diego Trolley from a 24-mile to a 30-mile system consisting of lines in two major travel corridors," MTDB Chairman James R. Mills said in a news release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1985 | KATHLEEN H. COOLEY, Times Staff Writer
In what could be a serious setback for the San Diego Trolley's eastern extension, the Reagan Administration has notified Congress that it does not intend to distribute millions of dollars already allocated for the railway. In all, the Administration said it does not intend to spend $223 million allocated during the last two years for mass transit projects in five cities, including San Diego, Los Angeles, St. Louis, Miami and Jacksonville, Fla.
NEWS
March 21, 1986 | KENNETH F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Teeming with civic pride and a smattering of smugness, San Diego unveiled its new east-west trolley line Thursday with boasts that gave some a feeling of deja vu. Like its five-year-old predecessor, which has ferried more than 23.9 million passengers between downtown and the Mexican border, the new 4.5-mile eastward extension was built under budget, ahead of schedule and without a nickel of federal funding. "Nobody else is doing that," said James R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1987 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Langley Powell is obsessed with graffiti. It is his enemy. He wants to see it eradicated forever, wiped from the part of the world he rules as general manager of the San Diego Trolley. If there is a quicker way to remove it, a better method of covering it, a more impregnable surface that can be applied to shelter walls and trolley cars, Powell will try it. At stake is the public image and ridership of a transit line that he claims is one of the cleanest in the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1991
An unidentified 42-year-old man died after he was run over by the San Diego Trolley in what authorities are classifying as a possible suicide. The San Diego Police Department said the man was seen kneeling on the tracks soon after midnight Saturday just before the trolley approached, near 61st Street and Imperial Avenue. He died at the scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1989
A San Diego Trolley car derailed Monday without injuring anyone, but delayed about 5,000 northbound morning commuters from the South Bay, authorities said. About 300 commuters were aboard the car when its two rear wheels derailed about 7 a.m. just before the Civic Center Drive stop in National City, said Langley C. Powell, president and general manager of San Diego Trolley Inc. The car stopped without overturning, he said. The trolley was traveling about 15 m.p.h. over a switch when the wheels derailed, Powell said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1992
A trolley car rammed a motor home that ran a red light downtown on Saturday, pitching the motor home on its side and slightly injuring two passengers. The injured people were treated at a nearby hospital and released a few hours after the collision at 9:30 a.m., said San Diego Police Sgt. Michael Davis. Firefighters were called to the scene near the intersection of C and Front streets, after a propane tank aboard the motor home was discovered to have a leak, Davis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newest San Diego Trolley extension was inaugurated Thursday in a ceremony that included a giant red ribbon, a jazz band, lots of pizza and plenty of promises that, with good transit, comes neighborhood revitalization. The cause for celebration is the half a mile stretch of track along the rail right of way from the Santa Fe Depot to Cedar Street. The segment, funded by the county and the Unified Port District, was built by the Metropolitan Transit Development Board.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | Associated Press
A river of mud slammed into four homes at the base of a hillside in the Encanto area of San Diego Wednesday, forcing the evacuation of about a dozen residents. City officials said they were worried that more damage could come from heavy rains expected to hit the area today. Officials also were concerned that additional mudslides could jeopardize a busy avenue and the nearby San Diego Trolley tracks. A portion of a block that was undermined by mud and water was closed to traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1992
A 35-year-old prisoner who escaped from his minimum-security work detail remained at large Thursday night, Donovan State Prison authorities said. Ronald F. Rutledge, who was serving a two-year sentence for possession of bad checks, was discovered missing from his work detail at the San Diego Trolley compound about 9:45 a.m. Wednesday, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
I was very pleased to read that the state Air Resources Board has passed (if not belatedly) a rule demanding cleaner gasoline formulas from oil companies by 1996. While this is certainly a step in the right direction, programs adopted in Denver, Colo., which required a "gasohol" additive during peak pollution periods, has met with great success. Since Southern California suffers from the greatest smog by far in the country, it is about time that more radical measures were adopted. It should not be forgotten that transportation alternatives are an important weapon in the fight against air pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1992
The San Diego City Council put an amicable end to a bitter debate over a San Diego Trolley alignment through Little Italy and Harbor View by approving $8 million to help fund underground tracks intended to avoid street-level traffic congestion. By a unanimous 8-0 vote, with Mayor Maureen O'Connor absent, the council agreed to share the project's cost with the San Diego Unified Port District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
The San Diego Trolley's Old Town extension moved closer to reality Wednesday with the acquisition of half of Santa Fe Railway's 3.15-mile right of way from downtown to Old Town State Park. The $17.5-million purchase by the trolley's parent agency, the San Diego Metropolitan Transit Development Board, involves the right to build light rail tracks parallel to Santa Fe's, from Grape Street near the County Administration Center to a state-owned parking lot west of Old Town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991
A picture is worth a thousand words. While reading The Times on Nov. 6, I came across the photo of a "palmy pathway," with joggers running down "a narrow strip of greenery that separates the San Diego Trolley line from Harbor Drive." This median strip is supposedly named "King Promenade"--the city's latest inadequate attempt to rectify the 1987 stripping of Martin Luther King Way from our city streets and the 1989 defeat of the naming of San Diego's new convention center in his honor.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|