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BUSINESS
November 9, 1991
San Diego Papers to Cut 30% of News Staff: The merger next year of the San Diego Union and Tribune will reduce the newspapers' editorial staffs by about 30%, Copley Newspapers executives have told Newspaper Guild leaders. When the morning Union and afternoon Tribune merge in February, their combined 429-person editorial, photography and library staffs will be cut by between 117 and 139 employees, Copley officials said. The cuts could save the Union-Tribune about $6 million annually.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - David Copley, owner and publisher of the San Diego Union-Tribune until it was sold in 2009, died Tuesday after crashing his Aston Martin near his home in La Jolla. Copley, 60, was found slumped in the front seat of his car early in the evening and rushed to Scripps Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. He had left a board meeting of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, saying he did not feel well. The cause of death was an apparent heart attack; Copley had received a heart transplant in 2005.
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NEWS
February 2, 1992 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego Tribune passed quietly into history Saturday, its readers reluctantly paying their last respects at newsstands throughout the city that the afternoon daily had served for 96 years. More resigned than mournful at the death of another newspaper, readers and souvenir hunters bought final copies of the Trib and its more well-to-do sister, the Union, both of which appeared for the last time as separate publications Saturday.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
The San Diego Union-Tribune, owned by Copley Press Inc., said it would cut at least 43 newsroom jobs and 40 other positions to reduce costs in response to "economic challenges" in the newspaper industry. The company, which has 1,422 employees, disclosed a voluntary buyout plan for nonunion workers in a memo Monday. If the number of applications falls short, the Union-Tribune will lay off people, according to the memo posted on the independent online newspaper site Voiceofsandiego.org.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
The San Diego Union-Tribune, owned by Copley Press Inc., said it would cut at least 43 newsroom jobs and 40 other positions to reduce costs in response to "economic challenges" in the newspaper industry. The company, which has 1,422 employees, disclosed a voluntary buyout plan for nonunion workers in a memo Monday. If the number of applications falls short, the Union-Tribune will lay off people, according to the memo posted on the independent online newspaper site Voiceofsandiego.org.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1991 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego Union and Tribune, whose distinct editorial voices and highly competitive news staffs belied their common ownership for more than 60 years, will merge early next year into a single newspaper with morning and afternoon editions, publisher Helen K. Copley announced Wednesday.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with jail for contempt of court, a reporter for the San Diego Union-Tribune bowed Tuesday to a judge's demand that he turn over unpublished material from a jailhouse interview with an accused killer. J. Harry Jones, 40, who has been with the newspaper for 13 years, provided Superior Court Judge John Thompson with a transcript of his notes from an interview with Jacob Isaac Henderson, an ex-convict accused of three murders.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Afternoon Edition Dies: The San Diego Union-Tribune today halts publication of its afternoon edition, the last vestige of the old San Diego Tribune, which owner Copley Newspapers merged with the San Diego Union in 1992. Copley Editor in Chief Herb G. Klein said the closing of the once-popular edition, which carried closing stock prices and was dubbed the "green sheet" because of its green newsprint, reflects a national trend of diminishing popularity of afternoon newspapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - David Copley, owner and publisher of the San Diego Union-Tribune until it was sold in 2009, died Tuesday after crashing his Aston Martin near his home in La Jolla. Copley, 60, was found slumped in the front seat of his car early in the evening and rushed to Scripps Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. He had left a board meeting of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, saying he did not feel well. The cause of death was an apparent heart attack; Copley had received a heart transplant in 2005.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman
Beverly Hills investment firm Platinum Equity, which recently bought the San Diego Union-Tribune newspaper, has emerged as a possible buyer of the Boston Globe. Platinum Equity has submitted a "preliminary bid" for the paper, according to a person with knowledge of the proposal. The firm is offering to pay $35 million for the paper and assume $59 million in pension liabilities, according to published reports. The New York Times Co. said in a regulatory filing last week that it was considering putting its New England Media Group, which includes the Globe, up for sale.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with jail for contempt of court, a reporter for the San Diego Union-Tribune bowed Tuesday to a judge's demand that he turn over unpublished material from a jailhouse interview with an accused killer. J. Harry Jones, 40, who has been with the newspaper for 13 years, provided Superior Court Judge John Thompson with a transcript of his notes from an interview with Jacob Isaac Henderson, an ex-convict accused of three murders.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Afternoon Edition Dies: The San Diego Union-Tribune today halts publication of its afternoon edition, the last vestige of the old San Diego Tribune, which owner Copley Newspapers merged with the San Diego Union in 1992. Copley Editor in Chief Herb G. Klein said the closing of the once-popular edition, which carried closing stock prices and was dubbed the "green sheet" because of its green newsprint, reflects a national trend of diminishing popularity of afternoon newspapers.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego Tribune passed quietly into history Saturday, its readers reluctantly paying their last respects at newsstands throughout the city that the afternoon daily had served for 96 years. More resigned than mournful at the death of another newspaper, readers and souvenir hunters bought final copies of the Trib and its more well-to-do sister, the Union, both of which appeared for the last time as separate publications Saturday.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1991
San Diego Papers to Cut 30% of News Staff: The merger next year of the San Diego Union and Tribune will reduce the newspapers' editorial staffs by about 30%, Copley Newspapers executives have told Newspaper Guild leaders. When the morning Union and afternoon Tribune merge in February, their combined 429-person editorial, photography and library staffs will be cut by between 117 and 139 employees, Copley officials said. The cuts could save the Union-Tribune about $6 million annually.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1991 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego Union and Tribune, whose distinct editorial voices and highly competitive news staffs belied their common ownership for more than 60 years, will merge early next year into a single newspaper with morning and afternoon editions, publisher Helen K. Copley announced Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They sauntered out like schoolchildren on a fire drill. But grade school was never quite like this. Employees at the San Diego Gas & Electric Encina power plant began their morning with a "surprise" earthquake drill, complete with smoke bombs and bodies wearing what looked like leftover Halloween makeup lying around the grounds. "Help me! Help me!" yelled a faux car accident victim decked out in a red-flecked work shirt and a fake eye.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Jerry Sanders, a former police chief, presented his long-awaited plan Tuesday to stem the flow of San Diego police officers to other law enforcement agencies. The key feature is the possibility -- although not a guarantee -- of a pay hike next year. That tentative promise was met with a lack of enthusiasm by the police officers labor union. "This plan falls short of giving officers a reason to stay," Steve McMillan, vice president of the San Diego Police Officers Assn.
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