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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1985
I do not mind being ridiculed if I have an opportunity to answer those who ridicule me. And that opportunity I was not given by the San Diego Water Authority on the subject of dowsing to find water to meet the needs of San Diego County ("Dowsers Come Up Dry at Meeting," April 12). For this occasion, they set up a "special, morning meeting with attendance not required" (but with the impression to me that I'd be addressing the whole group). Only a half-dozen or so of the 34 members showed up. Then, at the regular meeting in the afternoon (which I had not been invited to address)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The San Diego County water board voted Thursday to spend nearly $2 billion in the next 15 years in hopes of achieving what has been a civic goal here since World War II: breaking the region's near-total dependence on the Los Angeles-based Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.
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NEWS
February 27, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In mid-March, when the State Water Project all but stops pumping water to Southern California, no city in the region stands to lose more than this one. Stiff statewide cutbacks announced by Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday will effectively cut off state water deliveries to the Metropolitan Water District, the region's wholesaler, whose largest and most dependent customer is the San Diego County Water Authority.
NEWS
December 26, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Begin with the adage about one man seeing the glass as half-full and another seeing it half-empty. That's a start--but only a start--toward understanding how San Diego County and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California can survey the same set of water facts and arrive at diametrically opposite conclusions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a century ago, San Diego County was self-sufficient when it came to water--when World War II began, the largely undeveloped coastal plain actually had a water surplus. Today, the county is the fastest growing metropolitan area in the nation--and one of the thirstiest. Cursed with scarcely any ground water, it relies more heavily on buying imported water than any other county in Southern California.
NEWS
December 26, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Begin with the adage about one man seeing the glass as half-full and another seeing it half-empty. That's a start--but only a start--toward understanding how San Diego County and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California can survey the same set of water facts and arrive at diametrically opposite conclusions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1985 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
The rains continue, the rivers run high and the reservoirs sit full, even on the dry coastal plains of water-poor San Diego County. No matter to San Diego. Not even a deluge the scope of a Johnstown Flood would divert the attention of San Diego County water representatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The San Diego County water board voted Thursday to spend nearly $2 billion in the next 15 years in hopes of achieving what has been a civic goal here since World War II: breaking the region's near-total dependence on the Los Angeles-based Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Record rains and the feeling that the worst of California's drought might be over prompted the San Diego County Water Authority on Tuesday to consider reducing the region's water conservation goal from 20% to 10%. The authority's board of directors will vote on the lower target at its monthly meeting Thursday. But, at the same time that officials from Sacramento to San Diego reported optimistic news, others sounded warnings about the long term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1987 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
Federal environmental officials are objecting strongly to the proposed issuance of a permit for Pamo Dam, claiming that the San Diego region can meet its emergency water needs through construction of an alternate project that inflicts far less damage on the environment. In a lengthy report to be sent to the Army Corps of Engineers this week, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Record rains and the feeling that the worst of California's drought might be over prompted the San Diego County Water Authority on Tuesday to consider reducing the region's water conservation goal from 20% to 10%. The authority's board of directors will vote on the lower target at its monthly meeting Thursday. But, at the same time that officials from Sacramento to San Diego reported optimistic news, others sounded warnings about the long term.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In mid-March, when the State Water Project all but stops pumping water to Southern California, no city in the region stands to lose more than this one. Stiff statewide cutbacks announced by Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday will effectively cut off state water deliveries to the Metropolitan Water District, the region's wholesaler, whose largest and most dependent customer is the San Diego County Water Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a century ago, San Diego County was self-sufficient when it came to water--when World War II began, the largely undeveloped coastal plain actually had a water surplus. Today, the county is the fastest growing metropolitan area in the nation--and one of the thirstiest. Cursed with scarcely any ground water, it relies more heavily on buying imported water than any other county in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1985
I do not mind being ridiculed if I have an opportunity to answer those who ridicule me. And that opportunity I was not given by the San Diego Water Authority on the subject of dowsing to find water to meet the needs of San Diego County ("Dowsers Come Up Dry at Meeting," April 12). For this occasion, they set up a "special, morning meeting with attendance not required" (but with the impression to me that I'd be addressing the whole group). Only a half-dozen or so of the 34 members showed up. Then, at the regular meeting in the afternoon (which I had not been invited to address)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1985 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
The rains continue, the rivers run high and the reservoirs sit full, even on the dry coastal plains of water-poor San Diego County. No matter to San Diego. Not even a deluge the scope of a Johnstown Flood would divert the attention of San Diego County water representatives.
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