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San Diego Wild Animal Park

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NEWS
July 12, 1990 | BETSY S. SIINO
You wind your way along the narrow path, through the dense growth of trees, ferns and scarlet blossoms. Kookaburra birds laugh as you pass. The unmistakable trumpets of unseen elephants herald your presence. Then, amid the exotic jungle noises, there is another sound--the curious, lilting strains of a Viennese waltz. The music grows louder. You emerge into sunlight. Before you are horses, pure white horses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Modernist architect Eugene Weston III was in his early 30s when he declared that "the house is the last of the handcrafted objects" in an industrial age. The year was 1956, and he argued in The Times that even a modest house could be "more beautiful and meaningful" if it was built with post-and-beam construction that opens up interiors and invites the outdoors in through walls of glass. A third-generation Los Angeles architect, Weston built a string of midcentury homes here before spending three decades with a San Diego firm known for such large-scale commissions as the Old Globe Theatre, San Diego Wild Animal Park and several major buildings at UC San Diego.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
One of the three northern white rhinos at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park has died, possibly of old age, officials announced Wednesday. Northern white rhinos are one of the world's most endangered species; only a dozen are known to exist. Nadi had been at the Wild Animal Park since 1972.
TRAVEL
May 16, 2010 | By Terry Gardner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I admit it: I fall in love easily. First, it was with a 268-pound guy. Despite his youth, he was gray and wrinkled. But there were others as the day wore on. One had a face like a horse. Another was nice-enough looking, but that neck — oh, heavens, that neck. And yet another was way too fast for me. Oh, baby. Or, more correctly, babies. These were all animal babies — an African elephant, a zebra, a giraffe and a cheetah, respectively — I saw on a two-hour photo caravan at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1992 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing on the corner, watching all the butterflies. Those ephemeral, rainbow-hued wisps of flight hardly conjure up the macho-jungle image of the San Diego Wild Animal Park as symbolized by its horned rhino logo. But, beginning today, visitors to the world-renowned animal preserve can soak in the beauty of the winged world that is the province of the second-largest order of insects.
TRAVEL
July 15, 2007 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
Aloud bird-like squawk breaks the night silence. Then the unmistakable sound of a lion's roar. An angry lion. The lion sounds close by but not as close as the snoring from the tent next door. The first thing to know about the appropriately named "Roar and Snore" sleepover program at San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park is that very little sleeping occurs. But the morning vista from the door of our tent more than makes up for the sleepless night.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A California condor hatched at San Diego Wild Animal Park, becoming the third chick produced this year in a program to save the endangered species from extinction, a park spokesman said. The condor, named Otum, a Yuki Indian word meaning spirit, emerged unassisted from the egg, spokesman Tom Hanscom said. The hatching raised to 43 the population of California condors, North America's largest land birds.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | United Press International
An elephant that recently underwent a historic Cesarean section was destroyed Friday night when veterinarians determined a raging infection was incurable, said officials at the San Diego Wild Animal Park. Veterinary surgeons operated on Jean again when the animal did not respond to treatment. They discovered a ruptured uterus and a severe infection. When surgeons were unable to remove the uterus, they decided to give the elephant a lethal dose of anesthetic.
NEWS
October 13, 1986
The Los Angeles Zoo has received the U.S. Department of the Interior's Conservation Service Award for its contributions to the Condor Recovery Program, which seeks to ensure the survival of the endangered California condor. A dozen of the birds are now at the zoo, which has been rearing young condors and preparing them for release into the wild. Twelve more are at the San Diego Wild Animal Park. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
ESCONDIDO The first of 10 California condor eggs has hatched at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, officials said Wednesday. The chick weighed 183 grams and was healthy when it was hatched Friday, they said. When the chick is 2 months old, park officials will release it and any other hatchlings into a habitat with two condors that will teach the chicks how to behave. The chicks could be released into the wild within a year, park officials said.
TRAVEL
May 17, 2009 | Jane Engle
"It's cheaper than going to Africa, I'll say that," Christine said as she scanned a rolling savanna where giraffes, gazelles and elephants ambled within a few dozen yards of a tent she shared with her husband, Jim. For the Claremont couple and more than 50 other safari wannabes like me who spent a chilly Saturday night in March at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park, the aptly named Roar & Snore camp out was also enlightening, fun and a little eerie. But not necessarily restful.
TRAVEL
July 15, 2007 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
Aloud bird-like squawk breaks the night silence. Then the unmistakable sound of a lion's roar. An angry lion. The lion sounds close by but not as close as the snoring from the tent next door. The first thing to know about the appropriately named "Roar and Snore" sleepover program at San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park is that very little sleeping occurs. But the morning vista from the door of our tent more than makes up for the sleepless night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
One of the three northern white rhinos at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park has died, possibly of old age, officials announced Wednesday. Northern white rhinos are one of the world's most endangered species; only a dozen are known to exist. Nadi had been at the Wild Animal Park since 1972.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The tourists at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park were staring at the giraffes. More important, the giraffes were staring back. "I thought one was trying to tell me something," said Mary Sullivan, visiting San Diego from Portland, Ore., with her carpenter husband and their two young sons. "We were a lot closer than we expected." The family Sullivan was aboard the park's latest attraction, the African Express, as it meandered 2.5 miles through ersatz African terrain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
While the Los Angeles Zoo is transferring its lone African elephant to a sanctuary, the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park is undergoing an elephant population boom. On Sunday, Litsemba, a 17-year-old African elephant, gave birth to a healthy male weighing between 250 and 300 pounds. Mother and calf are visible on the elephant cam on the park's website, www.wildanimalpark.org. Two other African elephants at the park -- Umoya and Lungile -- are pregnant and due later this year, officials said.
NEWS
June 1, 2006 | Don Patterson, Special to The Times
THE day's feature attraction, a female cheetah named Karoo, has just zipped down the dirt track at full throttle in a blur of orange and black. Now, it's Sven's turn. Sven is a shaggy golden retriever who has been Karoo's lifelong companion. On this Sunday morning at the Wild Animal Park in Escondido, he follows in the big cat's footsteps, but as he hits full stride, it appears lost on no one that, by comparison, he's slogging in slow motion. It's not that he is slow.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
San Diego Wild Animal Park officials have determined that elephant keeper Pamela Orsi was killed when she was trampled by an elephant, not because she intervened between two battling pachyderms as was initially believed. Four witnesses told park officials the 27-year-old Ramona woman was tending to one elephant Thursday afternoon when a second knocked her down and stepped on her head.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | CAROLINE LEMKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred, the comedic cockatoo made famous in the 1970s television series "Baretta," was stolen from his cage at San Diego Wild Animal Park, police said Wednesday. The missing cockatoo was one of three that portrayed Robert Blake's pet in the ABC series about an unconventional cop. The winner of a Patsy--the animal equivalent of an Academy Award--Fred had been performing in shows at the Wild Animal Park for the last six years. The theft of the 30-year-old cockatoo occurred between 4:15 p.m.
TRAVEL
May 22, 2005
California: cheetah safari Cheetah Run Safari, San Diego Wild Animal Park, 15500 San Pasqual Valley Road, Escondido; (760) 747-8702, www.sandiegozoo.org/wap. "In this amazing event, a full-grown cheetah runs at 60 to 70 mph. In addition, there is a fascinating presentation of the cheetah to the crowd -- no fences -- with questions and answers by informative handlers. And there's a beautiful buffet served on tablecloths in an African tent." Costs: $69 for the safari, including buffet, plus $28.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Majani was not at top speed Saturday, but he compensated for it with an extra dose of sociability. Sleek and gorgeous at 130 pounds, 3-year-old Majani (which is Swahili for "grasslands") is a cheetah, a species of medium-sized cat that is considered the fastest land animal in the world.
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