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San Dimas Experimental Forest

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2001 | CARA MIA DiMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's more than three times the size of Santa Monica, but it has only two residents. Although close to suburbia, it somehow manages to go largely undetected. Skiers and hikers seeking adventure in Angeles National Forest often pass its northern border without ever noticing its simple entry gate or the "no trespassing" sign posted nearby. But anonymity is an asset. It might even be the greatest strength of San Dimas Experimental Forest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2001 | CARA MIA DiMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's more than three times the size of Santa Monica, but it has only two residents. Although close to suburbia, it somehow manages to go largely undetected. Skiers and hikers seeking adventure in Angeles National Forest often pass its northern border without ever noticing its simple entry gate or the "no trespassing" sign posted nearby. But anonymity is an asset. It might even be the greatest strength of San Dimas Experimental Forest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1986
Veysey is concerned about a "planned burn" of the Angeles National Forest, specifically the potential ecological damage and human health effects. His attitude was that the parties involved had lost their "perspective and sense of purpose." As is usual in such cases, I'm afraid neither he nor The Times got the whole story. First, I would like to point out that this is a prescribed burn. The term "prescribed" is the key here. Such fires are set under extremely strict guidelines to ensure the safety of the people involved, to reduce the negative impact to the environment and to reduce the effects of the quantities of smoke produced on the urban environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1986
Veysey is concerned about a "planned burn" of the Angeles National Forest, specifically the potential ecological damage and human health effects. His attitude was that the parties involved had lost their "perspective and sense of purpose." As is usual in such cases, I'm afraid neither he nor The Times got the whole story. First, I would like to point out that this is a prescribed burn. The term "prescribed" is the key here. Such fires are set under extremely strict guidelines to ensure the safety of the people involved, to reduce the negative impact to the environment and to reduce the effects of the quantities of smoke produced on the urban environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1998
A peak in the San Gabriel Mountains will be named in honor of former Covina Mayor Charles Colver, a renowned U.S. Forest Service veteran who died last weekend. Colver Peak, a 5,511-foot mountain just west of Mt. Baldy Village, will appear on U.S. Forest Service maps in five years, said David Larson, the manager of the San Dimas Experimental Forest. Colver, 77, died Saturday in Portland, Ore. "He was employed here for 42 years," Larson said. "He was a great man."
SCIENCE
April 1, 2002 | CARA MIA DiMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a wooden shed tucked away in the Angeles National Forest, history is stored in a bottle. Or, to be more precise, in almost 1,000 Mason jars filled with 65-year-old dirt. The byproducts of a failed science project concluded long ago, the jars, and the quart of mountain soil each one holds, are the leading characters in a tale of how serendipity sometimes shapes science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1986 | ANDREW C. REVKIN, Times Staff Writer
A change in the weather and a change in the position of South Coast Air Quality Management District officials have delayed a large experimental chaparral fire that was to be set in the Angeles National Forest this week. The fire, which could have been set as early as Wednesday in 1,200 acres of brush in the hills north of San Dimas, is to be studied by dozens of scientists and more than a half dozen government agencies--from the Defense Department to the Los Angeles County Fire Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2002 | CARA MIA DiMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the casualties of the Williams fire that swept through the Angeles National Forest was a small, pyramid-shaped shed that might be easy to ignore on the list of 62 homes and 14 outbuildings destroyed. But the underground shed housed strange yet precious cargo: Nearly 1,000 jars filled with dirt collected 67 years ago, a living archive of sorts that in recent years had been a gold mine for soil scientists.
NEWS
June 30, 1985 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Most people think of forest fires, muds sides and air pollution as environmental disasters. But scientists at the San Dimas Experimental Forest, which stretches from the foothills to the timberline, think of them as opportunities. It is somewhat natural that the scientists at the federal research enclave in Angeles National Forest think that way.
NEWS
June 30, 1985 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Most people think of forest fires, mud slides and air pollution as environmental disasters. But scientists at the San Dimas Experimental Forest, which stretches from the foothills to the timberline, think of them as opportunities. It is somewhat natural that the scientists at the federal research enclave in Angeles National Forest think that way.
NEWS
August 4, 1986 | TED THACKREY Jr., Times Staff Writer
Fires, some deliberately set, destroyed almost 400 acres of brush in four areas of California Sunday. No one was seriously injured, and no major structures were destroyed. "It's the result of good training, quick action, clear thinking . . . and an awful lot of luck," said U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Rita Plair. The last fire was controlled at about 6 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Firefighters touched off a second brush fire Monday in the San Dimas forest that scientists hoped would enable them to test whether dense smoke from a nuclear war could enshroud the Earth and bring on a cataclysmic "nuclear winter." As researchers gathered data from positions on the ground and in specially equipped aircraft flying above, the blaze blackened an estimated 300 acres of the U.S.
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