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San Fernando Ca History

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At grade school, he was given a drum to beat and called Apache. When he went home, Rudy Ortega asked why his teacher had called him Indian. Because you are Indian, Rudy's mother explained that day in San Fernando. But six decades later, no one has yet answered all of Ortega's probing questions about his Native American ancestry. Ortega is 73 now. His silvery hair is pulled back in a ponytail, and turquoise and silver jewelry adorns his neck and fingers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At grade school, he was given a drum to beat and called Apache. When he went home, Rudy Ortega asked why his teacher had called him Indian. Because you are Indian, Rudy's mother explained that day in San Fernando. But six decades later, no one has yet answered all of Ortega's probing questions about his Native American ancestry. Ortega is 73 now. His silvery hair is pulled back in a ponytail, and turquoise and silver jewelry adorns his neck and fingers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
San Fernando, the Valley's first town site, is the only city completely bordered by Los Angeles, a distinction that would probably sit well with the pair of former state senators, Charles Maclay and George K. Porter, who started it all. Maclay seems to have enjoyed the higher profile of the two. Born in Pennsylvania in 1822, he was sent to Northern California as a Methodist missionary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
San Fernando, the Valley's first town site, is the only city completely bordered by Los Angeles, a distinction that would probably sit well with the pair of former state senators, Charles Maclay and George K. Porter, who started it all. Maclay seems to have enjoyed the higher profile of the two. Born in Pennsylvania in 1822, he was sent to Northern California as a Methodist missionary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1995 | TIM MAY
Until recently, Kalisher Street was just another avenue through an unflattering side of San Fernando--a tough area trolled by gang members and troublemakers. But in March, when the San Fernando City Council proposed changing the street's name to honor the late labor leader Cesar Chavez, the idea angered a surprisingly large number of residents, many of them members of multi-generational San Fernando families who recall Kalisher Street in kinder days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1995 | TIM MAY
Until recently, Kalisher Street was just another avenue through an unflattering side of San Fernando--a tough area trolled by gang members and troublemakers. But in March, when the San Fernando City Council proposed changing the street's name to honor the late labor leader Cesar Chavez, the idea angered a surprisingly large number of residents, many of them members of multi-generational San Fernando families who recall Kalisher Street in kinder days.
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