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San Fernando Ca Landmarks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
For years, friends had been telling Octavio Palacios that the old Lopez Adobe was haunted. Emptied of its contents and shuttered after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, it isn't hard to see why the 13-year-old believed them. That was until Thursday night, however, when Octavio got his first look inside the historic home with its treasure of antique furniture and artifacts and decided that the stories were all a lot of bunk. "It's dope!" Octavio said, after a thorough tour of the two-story adobe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
For years, friends had been telling Octavio Palacios that the old Lopez Adobe was haunted. Emptied of its contents and shuttered after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, it isn't hard to see why the 13-year-old believed them. That was until Thursday night, however, when Octavio got his first look inside the historic home with its treasure of antique furniture and artifacts and decided that the stories were all a lot of bunk. "It's dope!" Octavio said, after a thorough tour of the two-story adobe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly four years of "double bunking" with their peers in Van Nuys, employees of the San Fernando courthouse probably feel a lot like visiting relatives who are forced to stay longer than they planned. Since they were moved because of damage wrought by the 1994 Northridge earthquake, workers have taken up residence in some unusual--and cramped--spaces in and around the Van Nuys Government Center. Now, with $17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly four years of "double bunking" with their peers in Van Nuys, employees of the San Fernando courthouse probably feel a lot like visiting relatives who are forced to stay longer than they planned. Since they were moved because of damage wrought by the 1994 Northridge earthquake, workers have taken up residence in some unusual--and cramped--spaces in and around the Van Nuys Government Center. Now, with $17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN
A 110-year-old cemetery whose occupants include early San Fernando Valley settlers and Native Americans was declared a cultural and historic landmark Tuesday by the Los Angeles City Council. The council's decision makes the San Fernando Pioneer Cemetery in Sylmar only the fifth burial site included on the city's list of 585 historical landmarks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1997
The San Fernando Mission, celebrating its bicentennial, stands as a reminder of the San Fernando Valley's complex history. In hindsight, the mission's original intent, to ensure a Spanish presence in California by creating a productive citizenry of converted natives, did not succeed as planned and decimated a native culture. However, the mission remains a central part of the Valley's past, and among the questions we face today is how to view its historical significance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1995 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the past 12 years, for better or for worse, the Lopez Adobe, a crumbling, historic building owned by the city of San Fernando, and Albert Weinmann, an ailing and aged carpenter, have been joined in a kind of common-law marriage. Weinmann never had a contract with the city, never paid rent and never received a salary. But he lived in the two-story, Victorian-style adobe nonetheless, tending to the general maintenance needs of the 115-year-old building and acting as a round-the-clock watchman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1997
With their red-tile roofs and white stucco walls, their lush groves and gardens, the missions have become central to our collective notion of what California looks like. According to art historian Norman Neuerburg, it's no accident that these evocative buildings are a crucial element in the Golden State of our imaginations. "The only pieces of architecture of significance before the American period were the missions and the chapels of the presidios," he points out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1996 | TIM MAY
After months of delays caused by wrangling with federal officials over the cost of earthquake repairs for the historic Lopez Adobe, work is scheduled to begin within the next few months, city officials said. The 115-year-old adobe, an important California landmark, has been closed to the public since the January 1994 Northridge earthquake, when the building's chimney and part of the roof collapsed. Several of the building's thick adobe walls also must be repaired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1997
The San Fernando Mission, celebrating its bicentennial, stands as a reminder of the San Fernando Valley's complex history. In hindsight, the mission's original intent, to ensure a Spanish presence in California by creating a productive citizenry of converted natives, did not succeed as planned and decimated a native culture. However, the mission remains a central part of the Valley's past, and among the questions we face today is how to view its historical significance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1997
With their red-tile roofs and white stucco walls, their lush groves and gardens, the missions have become central to our collective notion of what California looks like. According to art historian Norman Neuerburg, it's no accident that these evocative buildings are a crucial element in the Golden State of our imaginations. "The only pieces of architecture of significance before the American period were the missions and the chapels of the presidios," he points out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1996 | TIM MAY
After months of delays caused by wrangling with federal officials over the cost of earthquake repairs for the historic Lopez Adobe, work is scheduled to begin within the next few months, city officials said. The 115-year-old adobe, an important California landmark, has been closed to the public since the January 1994 Northridge earthquake, when the building's chimney and part of the roof collapsed. Several of the building's thick adobe walls also must be repaired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1995 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the past 12 years, for better or for worse, the Lopez Adobe, a crumbling, historic building owned by the city of San Fernando, and Albert Weinmann, an ailing and aged carpenter, have been joined in a kind of common-law marriage. Weinmann never had a contract with the city, never paid rent and never received a salary. But he lived in the two-story, Victorian-style adobe nonetheless, tending to the general maintenance needs of the 115-year-old building and acting as a round-the-clock watchman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN
A 110-year-old cemetery whose occupants include early San Fernando Valley settlers and Native Americans was declared a cultural and historic landmark Tuesday by the Los Angeles City Council. The council's decision makes the San Fernando Pioneer Cemetery in Sylmar only the fifth burial site included on the city's list of 585 historical landmarks.
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