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San Fernando Gardens Housing Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streets and alleys of the labyrinthine San Fernando Gardens housing project transform at night: They become drive-through drug markets, gang war zones, speedways where drunk drivers crash into parked cars. So Rosa Roman and other tenants are pleased that the Los Angeles Housing Authority has begun constructing an eight-foot fence to enclose the 30-acre, 2,000-resident public housing complex in Pacoima.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up in Guatemala, Maria Fuentes never attended school, so she never formally learned to read and write. Now, the 46-year-old is on a mission not only to become literate in her native language, but to learn English as well. She said she was inspired by her 7-year-old daughter, Andrea, who has been tutored in a year-old literacy program at the San Fernando Gardens, the largest public housing project in the San Fernando Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1997 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It doesn't particularly look or feel like Christmas at the San Fernando Gardens housing project or anywhere else in the rundown neighborhood around Pacoima Elementary School. The streets, lined with old cars and overfilled trash bins, are mostly empty by dark. The residents stay behind closeddoors in two-story apartment complexes marked with graffiti and enclosed by 7-foot-tall fences. Only a few windows display simple Christmas lights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1998 | HOLLY EDWARDS
San Fernando Gardens is among nine city Housing Authority facilities that will share equally in a $2.1-million federal grant for drug elimination efforts. Awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the grant will help bring law enforcement and social services programs to each housing project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 50 residents of the San Fernando Gardens housing project demonstrated Friday in support of the project's former community services director, who says he was forced to resign because he had urged the city of Los Angeles to hire a bilingual job development coordinator for the low-income apartment complex. Carrying placards, the protesters, with children in tow, listened to speeches in front of the community services center in support of Al Ortiz, who resigned in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1990 | BETSY BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In summers past, television and trouble filled most evenings for children at the San Fernando Gardens housing project in Pacoima. So when VISTA volunteer Rosa Roman started making phone calls and knocking on doors several months ago, gauging parents' interest in a pilot 4-H Club within the housing project, the response overwhelmed her. More than 190 children signed up, and 35 attended the club's first arts and crafts session in temporary Quonset hut quarters last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neighbors Patricia Berry and Delfina Martinez have spent many afternoons sitting together outside their homes at the Van Nuys Pierce Park Apartments in Pacoima, their 20-year friendship a symbol of racial harmony amid ethnic change. From their vantage point in one of the San Fernando Valley's two major low-income housing projects, they have watched a population that was predominantly black two decades ago become 75% Latino. "All of my neighbors around me now are Hispanics," Berry said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ceremony was intended to mark a victory over delay and disappointment: After three years of effort, ground was being broken for a long-promised community center for residents of the San Fernando Gardens public housing project in Pacoima. Bureaucrats noted the need for the center--whose purpose was to provide space for job training and language classes, gang-prevention programs and day-care services for the children of working parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1998 | HOLLY EDWARDS
San Fernando Gardens is among nine city Housing Authority facilities that will share equally in a $2.1-million federal grant for drug elimination efforts. Awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the grant will help bring law enforcement and social services programs to each housing project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1999 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up in Guatemala, Maria Fuentes never attended school, so she never formally learned to read and write. Now, the 46-year-old is on a mission not only to become literate in her native language, but to learn English as well. She said she was inspired by her 7-year-old daughter, Andrea, who has been tutored in a year-old literacy program at the San Fernando Gardens, the largest public housing project in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Gardens resident Irma Morales tried to smile when she heard that Mario Matute, project director for the public housing development's community service center, had taken another job. "Mario," she said. "You are leaving?" A minute later Morales cried openly. "Por que?" she asked, between sobs. "Why?" To help more people in the largely Latino, largely poor community improve their lives, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Universal Studios Hollywood, in an effort to hire disabled workers for entry-level jobs during its busiest seasons, turned to public housing Wednesday. Studio representatives at San Fernando Gardens, the only major public housing project in the San Fernando Valley, began screening job applicants for a federally funded program to help Universal hire 700 workers over the next five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1997 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It doesn't particularly look or feel like Christmas at the San Fernando Gardens housing project or anywhere else in the rundown neighborhood around Pacoima Elementary School. The streets, lined with old cars and overfilled trash bins, are mostly empty by dark. The residents stay behind closeddoors in two-story apartment complexes marked with graffiti and enclosed by 7-foot-tall fences. Only a few windows display simple Christmas lights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1997 | DADE HAYES
Providing what officials call "the other piece of the puzzle," a $500,000 grant from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development will allow a long-unused day care facility at San Fernando Gardens to open. Last fall, the public housing project used a separate HUD grant to launch a joint job training and child care program. The Child Care Network Program gives residents child care through a network of small child care businesses located within the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
Amid the jumble of 40-year-old, government-built, cinder-block homes, the pristine white-and-green building is an almost literal lighthouse. The hope is that those who live in the San Fernando Gardens housing complex will be drawn to the Multipurpose Community Center and leave speaking English or with their high-school equivalency diplomas or with well-paying jobs. "This is called a multipurpose center but it really has only one purpose," said U.S. Rep. Howard Berman (D-Panorama City).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ceremony was intended to mark a victory over delay and disappointment: After three years of effort, ground was being broken for a long-promised community center for residents of the San Fernando Gardens public housing project in Pacoima. Bureaucrats noted the need for the center--whose purpose was to provide space for job training and language classes, gang-prevention programs and day-care services for the children of working parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
Amid the jumble of 40-year-old, government-built, cinder-block homes, the pristine white-and-green building is an almost literal lighthouse. The hope is that those who live in the San Fernando Gardens housing complex will be drawn to the Multipurpose Community Center and leave speaking English or with their high-school equivalency diplomas or with well-paying jobs. "This is called a multipurpose center but it really has only one purpose," said U.S. Rep. Howard Berman (D-Panorama City).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Gardens resident Irma Morales tried to smile when she heard that Mario Matute, project director for the public housing development's community service center, had taken another job. "Mario," she said. "You are leaving?" A minute later Morales cried openly. "Por que?" she asked, between sobs. "Why?" To help more people in the largely Latino, largely poor community improve their lives, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 50 residents of the San Fernando Gardens housing project demonstrated Friday in support of the project's former community services director, who says he was forced to resign because he had urged the city of Los Angeles to hire a bilingual job development coordinator for the low-income apartment complex. Carrying placards, the protesters, with children in tow, listened to speeches in front of the community services center in support of Al Ortiz, who resigned in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neighbors Patricia Berry and Delfina Martinez have spent many afternoons sitting together outside their homes at the Van Nuys Pierce Park Apartments in Pacoima, their 20-year friendship a symbol of racial harmony amid ethnic change. From their vantage point in one of the San Fernando Valley's two major low-income housing projects, they have watched a population that was predominantly black two decades ago become 75% Latino. "All of my neighbors around me now are Hispanics," Berry said.
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