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San Fernando History

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November 23, 2000 | ADAM HOLT
Gardena 29, San Fernando 19--Top-seeded Gardena (8-4) advanced at home despite being out-gained, 280 yards to 251. Trailing, 15-7, shortly before halftime, San Fernando (6-6) drove 60 yards in seven plays to the Mohican three. But quarterback Ruben Nevarez was stopped at the one on fourth and goal. Nevarez completed 14 of 27 passes for 168 yards, including a 37-yard touchdown to William Lang that cut Gardena's lead to 22-19 with eight minutes remaining.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2013 | By Bob Pool
For decades it has struggled along as the Rodney Dangerfield of Los Angeles. Dismissed as urbanized sprawl and best known to some for its porn shoots and failed secession efforts, the San Fernando Valley never seems to get any respect when it's compared to the rest of Los Angeles. "In the past it's gotten the short end of the stick as far as its history is concerned. Things just disappear," said Tommy Gelinas, who owns a T-shirt printing plant in North Hollywood and has a lifelong fascination with the Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1997
Moments in San Fernando Valley History 1797: San Fernando Mission is founded, 28 years after the first Spanish expedition of the San Fernando Valley made its way into the Valley via Sepulveda Pass. California will become part of Mexico 25 years later. 1834: The San Fernando Mission is secularized, and Andres Pico Adobe, named for the Mexican general, is built nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2002 | SUFIYA ABDUR-RAHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rolling along the streets of San Fernando in an electric car that resembled a high-tech golf cart, Mayor Cindy Montanez pointed out abandoned buildings and vacant lots that she sees as valuable symbols of the city's history. With some money, a developer with an eye for historic architecture and lots of hard work, she said, those overgrown plots and run-down structures could also be the city's future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1986 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
The newly elected Latino majority on the San Fernando City Council, which includes a voice from the South Side barrio for the first time in decades, will probably pay more attention to housing and police protection for the town's predominantly Latino population, council members said Wednesday. Councilman-elect Daniel Acuna, however, firmly opposes the idea of a Latino bloc on the council. Acuna, a postal carrier, and Ray D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1997 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a cool morning in the early 1800s, the Franciscan turned to face his congregation at Mission San Fernando. As he displayed the consecrated Host and the chalice of consecrated wine, the friar looked out at dozens of rapt faces, and joy filled his heart. Although he did it gladly, for the greater glory of God, the priest had suffered mightily in coming to this remote outpost of the Christian world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1997 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
The life of Antonio Maria Ortega, said to be the last Native American to speak the Fernandeno dialect, is interwoven with many of the famous people and places of San Fernando Valley past. Born at the San Fernando Mission in 1848, Ortega was raised at Rancho los Encinos (now the home of Los Encinos State Historic Park) on land his family had acquired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2002 | SUFIYA ABDUR-RAHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rolling along the streets of San Fernando in an electric car that resembled a high-tech golf cart, Mayor Cindy Montanez pointed out abandoned buildings and vacant lots that she sees as valuable symbols of the city's history. With some money, a developer with an eye for historic architecture and lots of hard work, she said, those overgrown plots and run-down structures could also be the city's future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2013 | By Bob Pool
For decades it has struggled along as the Rodney Dangerfield of Los Angeles. Dismissed as urbanized sprawl and best known to some for its porn shoots and failed secession efforts, the San Fernando Valley never seems to get any respect when it's compared to the rest of Los Angeles. "In the past it's gotten the short end of the stick as far as its history is concerned. Things just disappear," said Tommy Gelinas, who owns a T-shirt printing plant in North Hollywood and has a lifelong fascination with the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
San Fernando, the Valley's first town site, is the only city completely bordered by Los Angeles, a distinction that would probably sit well with the pair of former state senators, Charles Maclay and George K. Porter, who started it all. Maclay seems to have enjoyed the higher profile of the two. Born in Pennsylvania in 1822, he was sent to Northern California as a Methodist missionary.
SPORTS
November 23, 2000 | ADAM HOLT
Gardena 29, San Fernando 19--Top-seeded Gardena (8-4) advanced at home despite being out-gained, 280 yards to 251. Trailing, 15-7, shortly before halftime, San Fernando (6-6) drove 60 yards in seven plays to the Mohican three. But quarterback Ruben Nevarez was stopped at the one on fourth and goal. Nevarez completed 14 of 27 passes for 168 yards, including a 37-yard touchdown to William Lang that cut Gardena's lead to 22-19 with eight minutes remaining.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1997 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a cool morning in the early 1800s, the Franciscan turned to face his congregation at Mission San Fernando. As he displayed the consecrated Host and the chalice of consecrated wine, the friar looked out at dozens of rapt faces, and joy filled his heart. Although he did it gladly, for the greater glory of God, the priest had suffered mightily in coming to this remote outpost of the Christian world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1997 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
The life of Antonio Maria Ortega, said to be the last Native American to speak the Fernandeno dialect, is interwoven with many of the famous people and places of San Fernando Valley past. Born at the San Fernando Mission in 1848, Ortega was raised at Rancho los Encinos (now the home of Los Encinos State Historic Park) on land his family had acquired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1997
Moments in San Fernando Valley History 1797: San Fernando Mission is founded, 28 years after the first Spanish expedition of the San Fernando Valley made its way into the Valley via Sepulveda Pass. California will become part of Mexico 25 years later. 1834: The San Fernando Mission is secularized, and Andres Pico Adobe, named for the Mexican general, is built nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
San Fernando, the Valley's first town site, is the only city completely bordered by Los Angeles, a distinction that would probably sit well with the pair of former state senators, Charles Maclay and George K. Porter, who started it all. Maclay seems to have enjoyed the higher profile of the two. Born in Pennsylvania in 1822, he was sent to Northern California as a Methodist missionary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1986 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
The newly elected Latino majority on the San Fernando City Council, which includes a voice from the South Side barrio for the first time in decades, will probably pay more attention to housing and police protection for the town's predominantly Latino population, council members said Wednesday. Councilman-elect Daniel Acuna, however, firmly opposes the idea of a Latino bloc on the council. Acuna, a postal carrier, and Ray D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
Anxious to preserve the San Fernando Valley's history since the 1920s, a Mission Hills-based organization is undertaking an oral history project to record the recollections of Valley pioneers before they are lost forever. The San Fernando Valley Historical Society will interview about a dozen longtime residents, civic leaders and politicians who may recall the time when the Valley was carpeted with orange groves or when Tarzana was known as Runnymede.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1998
Those who scoff and call the idea of San Fernando Valley history an oxymoron clearly have never stayed long. Even the most cursory tour--from the front seat of a car, for instance--reveals myriad street names--Lankershim, Mulholland, Van Nuys or Chandler, perhaps--honoring the long-dead barons whose politics and conniving were every bit as compelling as those of the royal courts. And closer observation--astride a favorite pony, maybe--reveals a rich unwritten past.
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