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OPINION
January 31, 1988
I was happy to see your extensive description of current advances in solar research in (Metro, Jan. 11). Unfortunately, the media are often more fascinated by distant galaxies and the birth of the universe than by our own star, which we can learn so much about. So we were glad to see some attention paid to it. However, the article neglected to point out that Southern California is the world's greatest center of solar research, and there are several other centers besides Mt. Wilson.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the survival of Cal State Northridge's earthquake-damaged solar observatory hanging in the balance, the scientist who runs the facility is considering using some rather unscientific tools--such as a hacksaw or cutting torch--to get it back in business for the crucial summer observing season. Although the two main telescopes at the San Fernando Observatory appear unharmed, they have not been used since Jan. 17.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the survival of Cal State Northridge's earthquake-damaged solar observatory hanging in the balance, the scientist who runs the facility is considering using some rather unscientific tools--such as a hacksaw or cutting torch--to get it back in business for the crucial summer observing season. Although the two main telescopes at the San Fernando Observatory appear unharmed, they have not been used since Jan. 17.
OPINION
January 31, 1988
I was happy to see your extensive description of current advances in solar research in (Metro, Jan. 11). Unfortunately, the media are often more fascinated by distant galaxies and the birth of the universe than by our own star, which we can learn so much about. So we were glad to see some attention paid to it. However, the article neglected to point out that Southern California is the world's greatest center of solar research, and there are several other centers besides Mt. Wilson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2001
Adrian D. Herzog, chairman of the Cal State Northridge physics and astronomy department, has died. He was 53. Although the cause of death has not yet been determined, he is believed to have had a heart attack, CSUN spokeswoman Carmen Ramos Chandler said. Herzog died Feb. 28 in the Northridge home he shared with his wife, Dora, Chandler said. "He was an important catalyst in advancing strategic planning in the College of Science and Mathematics," said Edward J. Carroll, dean of the college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1986 | Andrew Revkin, Times Staff Writer
Most astronomers yearn for clear, dark nights and a mountaintop prospect from which to scan the skies. Gary Chapman, a professor of astronomy and physics at California State University, Northridge, longs for smoggy, sunny San Fernando Valley days. And he is perfectly happy with the location of his white-domed observatory, tucked away on low ground among the power lines and ponds at the Los Angeles Reservoir, west of Sylmar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1986 | ANDREW C. REVKIN, Times Staff Writer
Most astronomers yearn for clear, dark nights and a mountaintop from which to scan the skies. Gary Chapman, a professor of astronomy and physics at California State University, Northridge, longs for smoggy, sunny San Fernando Valley days. And he is perfectly happy with the location of his white-domed observatory, tucked away on low ground among the power lines and ponds at the Los Angeles Reservoir west of Sylmar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a place where people fear crime and obsess on airline shuttle schedules, a land of bonsai clubs and super-fast roller coasters, where churches and commercial sex flourish side by side. Don't recognize it? Welcome to the San Fernando Valley, as viewed from the Internet. It's the view you would get of the Virtual Valley if you lived in Finland, say, or Zaire or Iowa, and surfing the Internet's World Wide Web was your only source of information about the place.
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