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San Fernando Valley Agriculture

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1993
Authorities trying to contain a new infestation of Mediterranean fruit flies were spraying Malathion, planning a release of sterile flies and making door-to-door visits in the San Fernando Valley. Agriculture officials found 77 Medfly larvae in fruit from a Granada Hills neighborhood, where 11 adult flies were trapped earlier this week. Two female flies were trapped nearby last week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1999
State agricultural officials have begun the second of four treatments in the north-central portion of the Valley to eradicate the season's first Oriental fruit fly infestation of the season. The county uses a "male annihilation treatment" to combat the flies, said Bob Donley, deputy director of the Environmental Protection Bureau of the county Agricultural Commissioner's Department. The spraying is done from trucks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun is drying away the morning haze, giving itself a clear view of Ann Bothwell's bit of living history. It's burnishing the dark green leaves of the 1,987 trees and settling in the pores of the hard infant fruit. Thus begins another day in what is believed to be the last commercial orange grove in the San Fernando Valley. Two-thirds of a century ago, citrus groves covered 15,000 acres of the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN
"Come on, baby," coaxed one man, with eyes skyward, in the midst of an orchard. "I want you." Roger Peterson of Woodland Hills was talking to an orange. A Valencia, to be exact. Awkwardly wielding a long-handled picker, the 62-year-old grandfather made his first attempt at harvesting oranges, and he was using every bit of persuasion he had.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun is drying away the morning haze in Woodland Hills, giving itself a clear view of Ann Bothwell's bit of living history. It's burnishing the dark green leaves of the 1,987 trees and settling in the pores of the hard infant fruit. Thus begins another day in what is believed to be the last commercial orange grove in the San Fernando Valley. Two-thirds of a century ago, citrus groves covered 15,000 acres of the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1994
Before the housing tracts, malls and freeways, the San Fernando Valley was home to a thriving citrus industry that in its heyday covered 15,000 acres. From the early 1920s to the late 1950s, oranges were grown and packed in harvested for local consumption as well as the rest of the country. Packing houses located in San Fernando, Pacoima, Reseda and Owensmouth (which was later renamed Canoga Park), processed the local oranges, mostly Valencias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1995 | FRANK MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Reality is beginning to sink in for farmer Joe Cicero, as the end nears for his family's more-than-40-year farming dynasty in the San Fernando Valley. For the last decade, Cicero's produce stand and farm at Pierce College has been his pride and joy, his second home. But now that he has lost his lease to a competitor, the place symbolizes his broken dreams. "I've been here 10 years trying to make money," Cicero said. "It takes a long time to make a business. It's just not fair."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1998 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill was riding the baler, Jana was driving the loader and Russ had wagon duty. So Pat O'Brien rolled a 110-pound bale into the shade and sat down to talk about harvesting hay. Enough hay to feed Pierce College's small herd of cattle. And the horses. And the sheep. And then some. Twenty-five hundred bales, worth about $25,000--money the school doesn't have, for an agriculture program that has been slowly withering for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1993 | MATTHEW HELLER
Several hours after the ornamental tree in Jean Akers' front yard was sprayed with malathion, you could still smell the pungent odor of the Medfly-killing chemical. "That is terrible," said the Granada Hills homeowner, grimacing at the odor. "I hope it's all right. I hope it does some good."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Councilman Joel Wachs and four San Fernando Valley rabbis appealed Thursday to Gov. George Deukmejian to postpone tonight's Valley malathion spraying, protesting that "insensitive" scheduling is forcing thousands of Jews to choose between a potential health risk and attending Sabbath services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun is drying away the morning haze in Woodland Hills, giving itself a clear view of Ann Bothwell's bit of living history. It's burnishing the dark green leaves of the 1,987 trees and settling in the pores of the hard infant fruit. Thus begins another day in what is believed to be the last commercial orange grove in the San Fernando Valley. Two-thirds of a century ago, citrus groves covered 15,000 acres of the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun is drying away the morning haze, giving itself a clear view of Ann Bothwell's bit of living history. It's burnishing the dark green leaves of the 1,987 trees and settling in the pores of the hard infant fruit. Thus begins another day in what is believed to be the last commercial orange grove in the San Fernando Valley. Two-thirds of a century ago, citrus groves covered 15,000 acres of the Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
Sherry Lopata absolutely loves the oranges growing in the orchard at the Orcutt Ranch Horticulture Center in West Hills. "The oranges are really sweet and juicy, not like the dried-out ones you'd find in the supermarkets," said Lopata of West Hills. "The oranges are a bit smaller but much tastier."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1998 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill was riding the baler, Jana was driving the loader and Russ had wagon duty. So Pat O'Brien rolled a 110-pound bale into the shade and sat down to talk about harvesting hay. Enough hay to feed Pierce College's small herd of cattle. And the horses. And the sheep. And then some. Twenty-five hundred bales, worth about $25,000--money the school doesn't have, for an agriculture program that has been slowly withering for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The Woodland Hills/West Hills Neighborhood Planning Advisory Council has approved plans for three developments in the West Valley. Two of the plans approved call for new businesses to open on sites that have long stood empty. The third, a housing development, may put an end to Cicero Farms, a nearly 54-year-old Valley tradition. A 10-acre property on Sherman Way at Sale Avenue has been the home of the produce stand and farm since it lost its lease at Pierce College about three years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1995 | FRANK MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Reality is beginning to sink in for farmer Joe Cicero, as the end nears for his family's more-than-40-year farming dynasty in the San Fernando Valley. For the last decade, Cicero's produce stand and farm at Pierce College has been his pride and joy, his second home. But now that he has lost his lease to a competitor, the place symbolizes his broken dreams. "I've been here 10 years trying to make money," Cicero said. "It takes a long time to make a business. It's just not fair."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1988
Agriculture officials declared victory Monday against a Mediterranean fruit fly infestation in the San Fernando Valley, lifting a 62-square-mile produce quarantine that had been in effect for more than three months. A total of six Medflies were found in the Valley in late July, but none has been found since then.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1993
State agriculture officials Thursday established a quarantine area for a huge swath of the San Fernando Valley where infestations of the Oriental fruit fly have been discovered. The quarantine covers a 55-square-mile area that includes all of Sherman Oaks and parts of Studio City, North Hollywood, Valley Village, Encino and Van Nuys, state officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1994
Before the housing tracts, malls and freeways, the San Fernando Valley was home to a thriving citrus industry that in its heyday covered 15,000 acres. From the early 1920s to the late 1950s, oranges were grown and packed in harvested for local consumption as well as the rest of the country. Packing houses located in San Fernando, Pacoima, Reseda and Owensmouth (which was later renamed Canoga Park), processed the local oranges, mostly Valencias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1993
State agriculture officials Thursday established a quarantine area for a huge swath of the San Fernando Valley where infestations of the Oriental fruit fly have been discovered. The quarantine covers a 55-square-mile area that includes all of Sherman Oaks and parts of Studio City, North Hollywood, Valley Village, Encino and Van Nuys, state officials said.
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