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San Fernando Valley Economy

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December 27, 1994 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Northridge temblor that hammered the region in January is still shaking the business community as the year draws to a close. Retailers, contractors, insurers and a host of large and small businesses whose livelihood depends on a local customer base have all been coping with its aftereffects. To be sure, the earthquake wasn't the only big business story in the San Fernando Valley this year. Aerospace and defense industry downsizing continued to plague the region.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to spur growth in a sagging section of the San Fernando Valley, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved $150,000 for three local chambers of commerce to create economic development plans. The Sun Valley, Pacoima and Sylmar chambers each will receive up to $50,000 under a plan pushed by Councilman Alex Padilla, who represents the area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999
For the second consecutive year, the San Fernando Valley's economy has turned in a robust performance based on new jobs, payroll, building permits and other measures, according to a comprehensive report from the San Fernando Valley Economic Research Center at Cal State Northridge. The report shows that private sector payroll rose more than 9%, to $23.8 billion, from 1997 to 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Are we running with the bulls or will we be trampled by the bears? Will the San Fernando Valley economy, on a roll for the past three years, succumb to what some experts see as a national economic slowdown coming for 2001? Or will the region, which has recovered from the blunt-force trauma of the mid-'90s recession and the Northridge earthquake, shake it off and continue to steam ahead?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After being ravaged by recession, the San Fernando Valley economy may now be facing the perils of prosperity, speakers at a Valley business conference said Friday. Over the past five years, the Valley economy has bounced backed strongly from the nationwide economic downturn, the Northridge earthquake and a major downsizing in the aerospace industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition of powerful business organizations has stepped up a campaign to defeat new rules designed to reduce jet noise at Van Nuys Airport, arguing they would harm the San Fernando Valley economy. In recent letters and phone calls, Los Angeles City Council members were urged to reject the noise ordinance by representatives of the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley economy is poised for continued growth this year, but nagging problems of traffic, education and land use must be addressed to prevent business defections to outlying suburbs, economist Jack Kyser said Thursday. Kyser, chief economist with the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., predicted a 2.3% increase in the number of jobs in the Valley region this year, contrasted with 2.4% in 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1999 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While numerous indicators point to a San Fernando Valley economy on the rebound, the failure of schools to adequately prepare students for jobs in the next century remains a dark cloud on the horizon, speakers at a business conference said Friday. "Educating the Workforce in the Coming Century" was among the most popular, and spirited, sessions at the 11th annual Business Forecast Conference, sponsored by the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1995 | JILL LEOVY
A business group charged with reviving the San Fernando Valley's lagging economy says the entertainment industry is the most promising for job growth in coming years. The Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley, a coalition of business and government leaders, says more people in the Valley now work in the movie industry than in defense or aerospace--a sharp contrast to five years ago.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Recessions don't just end, they peter out. 1996 in the San Fernando Valley was a case in point: Optimism abounded, but genuine economic growth remained elusive and many business people had to be content with hopes of a recovery on its way--though not, apparently, in any hurry. "Everyone is expecting a recovery . . . but it's not showing up," said Shirley Svorny, economics professor and director of the new Center for the Study of the San Fernando Valley Economy at Cal State Northridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
Residential real estate took a big bounce back toward positive territory; entertainment employment grew despite one strike and the looming threat of another, and, oh yeah, we didn't face Armageddon on New Year's Day. Not bad for the first-born child of the new millennium. Like the rest of the region, the San Fernando Valley had many more positives than negatives in its economic performance during 2000, even with the tech-wreck last spring and the attendant ill health of many Internet companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After being ravaged by recession, the San Fernando Valley economy may now be facing the perils of prosperity, speakers at a Valley business conference said Friday. Over the past five years, the Valley economy has bounced backed strongly from the nationwide economic downturn, the Northridge earthquake and a major downsizing in the aerospace industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Turning in a stronger performance than Los Angeles County as a whole, payroll for private sector jobs in the San Fernando Valley grew by 7% between 1998 and 1999, to $25.3 billion, according to a Cal State Northridge report being released today. By comparison, private sector payroll countywide grew by just over 5% in the same period, according to the report by the school's San Fernando Valley Economic Research Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The median price of a single-family home in the San Fernando Valley slipped in September from a record in August but remained above pre-recession levels. The median price (the point at which half the homes sold for more and half for less) was $247,000 in September, down 3.1% from $255,000 in August, a trade group reported Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new agency to provide financial help for small businesses in the economically distressed northeast San Fernando Valley has been created under a bill signed by Gov. Gray Davis. The bill provides about $5 million for business loan guarantees. The legislation by Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar) follows a study that identified the northeast Valley as one of five areas in the state in which small businesses have the most difficulty acquiring capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
Last summer was not a very pleasant time for the folks at the Valley Economic Development Center. The longtime president and longtime chairman were facing questions about financial deals, media scrutiny was intense and board members of the Van Nuys-based business assistance agency were bolting for the door quicker than you could say "meeting adjourned." It was not exactly the summer of love.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Hollywood is fretting about a downturn in production and the flight of jobs to cheaper markets such as Canada and Australia, a certain niche of the entertainment world is quietly flourishing: porn. This summer, grips, gaffers and best boys of mainstream movie-making are marching down Hollywood Boulevard in an effort to save their jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When 8-year-old Evelyn Salcedo needed a tonsillectomy, her mother took her to Michoacan for the operation. The reason? Ana Salcedo had been charged $400 earlier for tests at a hospital in the San Fernando Valley. Without insurance, government assistance or private means, Salcedo could only afford a doctor in Mexico. It was the same for Rosaura Haro. When she and her daughter needed medical tests, she went south.
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