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San Fernando Valley Education

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major boost to the local education scene, the Los Angeles Unified School District plans to open 15 new magnet centers next year, six of which will be based out of San Fernando Valley schools. District officials also announced that an existing magnet program--specializing in the humanities--at Cleveland High School in Reseda will expand by 180 slots next year, increasing the number of seats to 883. Cleveland is one of 135 magnet schools and centers currently in operation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Concerns about fairness to minority students dominated a forum on public schools Saturday at which San Fernando Valley residents questioned two proposals to break up the Los Angeles Unified School District. Speakers raised concerns about a proposal to create two districts in the north and south Valley as well as one offered by school district officials that would set up three Valley districts, each with enhanced autonomy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most San Fernando Valley-area high schools trailed the statewide average in either English or math proficiency among 1998 graduates who enrolled at Cal State University campuses, according to figures released this week. In an effort officials acknowledge is designed to shame high schools into shape, the CSU office of the chancellor released a statewide list of remediation rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most San Fernando Valley-area high schools trailed the statewide average in either English or math proficiency among 1998 graduates who enrolled at Cal State University campuses, according to figures released this week. In an effort officials acknowledge is designed to shame high schools into shape, the CSU office of the chancellor released a statewide list of remediation rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle lines grew a little sharper in 1998 over the future of public education in the San Fernando Valley. As the movement to break away from the Los Angeles Unified School District and create independent northern and southern Valley districts gained momentum, a number of opponents remained adamant about keeping the district whole.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly half of all San Fernando Valley residents believe their public schools are delivering an inadequate education, and a clear majority support a Valley breakaway from the mammoth Los Angeles Unified School District as a means of achieving more local control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the fight continues over who should operate Head Start programs, hundreds of children continue attending classes daily, oblivious to the adult crisis around them. During a recent visit to a classroom at the Martin Luther King Center in Pacoima--one of 87 Head Start classes run by the Latin American Civic Assn. in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys--children noisily played with toy telephones, sang songs in Spanish and English, drew pictures with crayons and ate a nutritious lunch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1992 | HENRY CHU
The Los Angeles Board of Education voted Monday to begin negotiating with a private developer in a significant step toward establishing the San Fernando Valley's first high school devoted exclusively to studies in medical science. By a 4-2 vote, the board authorized an agreement with Pacific Alliance Realty, a Los Angeles-based developer, to craft a plan for a mixed-use facility on 4 1/2 acres at Vanowen Street and Columbus Avenue in Van Nuys, across from Valley Presbyterian Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Concerns about fairness to minority students dominated a forum on public schools Saturday at which San Fernando Valley residents questioned two proposals to break up the Los Angeles Unified School District. Speakers raised concerns about a proposal to create two districts in the north and south Valley as well as one offered by school district officials that would set up three Valley districts, each with enhanced autonomy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offering a vision of smaller classes, a comprehensive curriculum and safe campuses, executives of a Tennessee company intent on building for-profit private schools across the nation met with dozens of parents Tuesday night to gauge their interest in locating one of the campuses in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried about overcrowded, financially strapped and impersonal middle schools, parents with children at one of three elementary charter schools in the northeast Valley wonder, what happens when students graduate? Jackie Elliot, a former Los Angeles teacher, administrator and health educator, hopes to have a place for 100 of those students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Activists from a San Fernando Valley group once seen as leaders of the secession movement in the Los Angeles school district acknowledge that their efforts are lagging. But after several stagnant months, leaders from Finally Restoring Excellence in Education, or FREE, say they plan to restart a petition drive this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle lines grew a little sharper in 1998 over the future of public education in the San Fernando Valley. As the movement to break away from the Los Angeles Unified School District and create independent northern and southern Valley districts gained momentum, a number of opponents remained adamant about keeping the district whole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major boost to the local education scene, the Los Angeles Unified School District plans to open 15 new magnet centers next year, six of which will be based out of San Fernando Valley schools. District officials also announced that an existing magnet program--specializing in the humanities--at Cleveland High School in Reseda will expand by 180 slots next year, increasing the number of seats to 883. Cleveland is one of 135 magnet schools and centers currently in operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996
A Philippine-born educator from New York with an eclectic background and extensive academic credentials was appointed president of Pierce College in Woodland Hills on Wednesday. E. Bing Inocencio, 60, associate provost for academic administration at New York City Technical College in Brooklyn and the only outsider among three finalists, was given a three-year contract for the $93,353-per-year job by trustees of the Los Angeles Community College District.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly half of all San Fernando Valley residents believe their public schools are delivering an inadequate education, and a clear majority support a Valley breakaway from the mammoth Los Angeles Unified School District as a means of achieving more local control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Annie lay dead on the classroom floor, her fingers curled loosely around a gun, a crimson wound staining her forehead. Cigarette butts and soda cans littered her desk and the floor. A plastic bag stuffed with what looked suspiciously like marijuana sat a few feet from her lifeless body. But this wasn't another example of spontaneous violence. This was a premeditated crime--plotted to the last detail by James Monroe High School teacher Kathy Floor. "Was it a suicide?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried about overcrowded, financially strapped and impersonal middle schools, parents with children at one of three elementary charter schools in the northeast Valley wonder, what happens when students graduate? Jackie Elliot, a former Los Angeles teacher, administrator and health educator, hopes to have a place for 100 of those students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the fight continues over who should operate Head Start programs, hundreds of children continue attending classes daily, oblivious to the adult crisis around them. During a recent visit to a classroom at the Martin Luther King Center in Pacoima--one of 87 Head Start classes run by the Latin American Civic Assn. in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys--children noisily played with toy telephones, sang songs in Spanish and English, drew pictures with crayons and ate a nutritious lunch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offering a vision of smaller classes, a comprehensive curriculum and safe campuses, executives of a Tennessee company intent on building for-profit private schools across the nation met with dozens of parents Tuesday night to gauge their interest in locating one of the campuses in the San Fernando Valley.
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