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San Fernando Valley Finances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley secession movement is often likened to a divorce demand by a neglected-feeling partner--so perhaps it's only fitting that the alimony could be a real killer. Under an obscure law passed seven years ago to help counties cope with dwindling finances, new cities can be formed in California only in a "revenue neutral" way that does not cost the government agency losing control of the area any money.
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NEWS
April 20, 2002 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The San Fernando Valley is financially robust enough to survive on its own, a report released Friday concluded, clearing the way for a possible November vote on whether to break up Los Angeles, the nation's second-largest city. The proposed Valley city would have 1.35 million residents, 14 city council districts, an elected mayor, an airport and a $1-billion budget, according to the report by the Local Agency Formation Commission.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley secession movement is often likened to a divorce demand by a neglected-feeling partner--so perhaps it's only fitting that the alimony could be a real killer. Under an obscure law passed seven years ago to help counties cope with dwindling finances, new cities can be formed in California only in a "revenue-neutral" way that does not cost the government agency losing control of the area any money.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY and SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A study that found San Fernando Valley cityhood feasible but dauntingly expensive gives secessionists some ammunition for their campaign but also provides support for those who want Los Angeles to stay together, political experts said Wednesday. The 400-page report, billed as the most extensive analysis ever of local government operations, has provided a feast for the political spin doctors on both sides of the issue.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY and SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A study that found San Fernando Valley cityhood feasible but dauntingly expensive gives secessionists some ammunition for their campaign but also provides support for those who want Los Angeles to stay together, political experts said Wednesday. The 400-page report, billed as the most extensive analysis ever of local government operations, has provided a feast for the political spin doctors on both sides of the issue.
NEWS
April 20, 2002 | SHARON BERNSTEIN and SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The San Fernando Valley is financially robust enough to survive on its own, a report released Friday concluded, clearing the way for a possible November vote on whether to break up Los Angeles, the nation's second-largest city. The proposed Valley city would have 1.35 million residents, 14 city council districts, an elected mayor, an airport and a $1-billion budget, according to the report by the Local Agency Formation Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The northern reaches of Los Angeles County experienced a few wins, a few losses and many temporary reprieves in the 1992-93 budget deliberations, which were suspended temporarily Wednesday by the Board of Supervisors. Decisions about the fates of many of the most visible programs that touch the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys--such as the proposed closure of 19 youth probation camps--were postponed until a meeting set for mid-September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1993 | MARK GLADSTONE and JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The recession-driven state budget unveiled Friday by Gov. Pete Wilson would cut hundreds of millions of dollars from San Fernando Valley-area cities that count on the funds to pay for police, fire and other services. But not everything in the Valley area is being trimmed. In his $51-billion spending package, Wilson proposed that the new state prison in Lancaster, set to open next month, receive $61.1 million for its first full year of operation. Mission College in Sylmar would get $8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rapid growth in the number of film, television and multimedia firms in the San Fernando Valley have made the area a close rival to Hollywood as the entertainment capital of the country, business leaders and real estate experts said Friday during an annual business forecast conference here. The region was roundly credited during the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1992 | JOSH MEYER and TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the smoke clears and the impact of the state budget crisis is better known, cities throughout the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys will be hobbled, but not nearly as badly as most had expected. Such was the assessment offered Wednesday by city officials, state budget experts and municipal lobbyists, just hours after the state finally passed its fiscal year budget and before all the details were officially announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a legal finding that new cities in the San Fernando Valley or Harbor areas might have to make payments to Los Angeles as the price of secession. The 10-4 vote gave the city attorney's office permission to submit the opinion to the county agency that is setting the rules for a potential breakup of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley secession movement is often likened to a divorce demand by a neglected-feeling partner--so perhaps it's only fitting that the alimony could be a real killer. Under an obscure law passed seven years ago to help counties cope with dwindling finances, new cities can be formed in California only in a "revenue neutral" way that does not cost the government agency losing control of the area any money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley secession movement is often likened to a divorce demand by a neglected-feeling partner--so perhaps it's only fitting that the alimony could be a real killer. Under an obscure law passed seven years ago to help counties cope with dwindling finances, new cities can be formed in California only in a "revenue-neutral" way that does not cost the government agency losing control of the area any money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rapid growth in the number of film, television and multimedia firms in the San Fernando Valley have made the area a close rival to Hollywood as the entertainment capital of the country, business leaders and real estate experts said Friday during an annual business forecast conference here. The region was roundly credited during the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1993 | MARK GLADSTONE and JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The recession-driven state budget unveiled Friday by Gov. Pete Wilson would cut hundreds of millions of dollars from San Fernando Valley-area cities that count on the funds to pay for police, fire and other services. But not everything in the Valley area is being trimmed. In his $51-billion spending package, Wilson proposed that the new state prison in Lancaster, set to open next month, receive $61.1 million for its first full year of operation. Mission College in Sylmar would get $8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1992 | JOSH MEYER and TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the smoke clears and the impact of the state budget crisis is better known, cities throughout the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys will be hobbled, but not nearly as badly as most had expected. Such was the assessment offered Wednesday by city officials, state budget experts and municipal lobbyists, just hours after the state finally passed its fiscal year budget and before all the details were officially announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a legal finding that new cities in the San Fernando Valley or Harbor areas might have to make payments to Los Angeles as the price of secession. The 10-4 vote gave the city attorney's office permission to submit the opinion to the county agency that is setting the rules for a potential breakup of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The northern reaches of Los Angeles County experienced a few wins, a few losses and many temporary reprieves in the 1992-93 budget deliberations, which were suspended temporarily Wednesday by the Board of Supervisors. Decisions about the fates of many of the most visible programs that touch the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys--such as the proposed closure of 19 youth probation camps--were postponed until a meeting set for mid-September.
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