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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From money to study San Fernando Valley secession to cash for new parkland in the Santa Monica Mountains, the $81-billion state budget signed Tuesday by Gov. Gray Davis provides funding for an array of area projects. As expected, Davis did not cut out the $1.8 million the Legislature had placed in the 1999-2000 spending plan to cover 80% of the secession study, probably ending a lengthy dispute over who should pay for the unprecedented analysis of breaking up Los Angeles.
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NEWS
April 20, 2002 | NITA LELYVELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the financial analysis now complete, the debate over Valley secession turns to politics, where it is likely to become more starkly combative. "Now the nitty-gritty starts," said Larry Berg, the founding director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics at USC. "Get out the money and take the gloves off and start debating this issue. "Secessionists really have had pretty much of a free ride in terms of influencing the public," he added.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Insisting on open debate, members of the Local Agency Formation Commission, the panel charged with overseeing the San Fernando Valley's proposed secession from Los Angeles, rebuffed a bid Wednesday by backers of the breakup to negotiate details of their plan with city leaders behind closed doors. "From this point forward, we have to adhere to a public disclosure mode, where everyone can see what we are doing," said County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, one of nine appointed commission members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2002 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sparking new protests from San Fernando Valley secessionists, the Los Angeles City Council approved a report Friday pegging the first-year cost of administering service contracts for a new Valley city at $16.3 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Taking a more prominent role on secession, the Los Angeles City Council on Monday formed a subcommittee that will weigh in on various aspects of the San Fernando Valley's bid to leave Los Angeles. At the request of Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski, Council President John Ferraro appointed the five-member panel to coordinate the city's release of data for an upcoming study on breaking up Los Angeles, and to provide the council and public with a forum for discussion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing the need for a "fair and even-handed" discussion of the issue, Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski asked the City Council on Tuesday to create a subcommittee to oversee an upcoming study on the San Fernando Valley's proposed secession from Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A panel of experts on San Fernando Valley secession agreed Tuesday the road to municipal divorce will be long and contentious before a vote can take place. Within the next few weeks, a nine-member commission will decide how it will tackle the monumental task of divvying up the city's assets in a way that would allow both members of the broken partnership to survive new and separate lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and JIM NEWTON and PATRICK MCGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the group pushing for San Fernando Valley secession said Wednesday that they were surprised by a Times poll that found 60% of Valley voters, and 47% of voters citywide, favor cleaving the Valley from the rest of Los Angeles. Richard Close of Valley VOTE, which recently collected signatures from 132,000 Valley voters to force a study of secession's economic repercussions, said the findings should prove beyond any doubt that many residents favor a breakup of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Valley secessionists seized on Sunshine Canyon as a battle cry Thursday, saying the Los Angeles City Council's decision to expand the dump will further their cause. Many north Valley residents who were against secession or ambivalent about it have suddenly become ardent supporters since the City Council voted 8-7 Wednesday to approve expansion of the Sunshine Canyon Landfill, said Wayde Hunter, president of the North Valley Coalition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
Have something to say about the San Fernando Valley's proposed breakaway from Los Angeles? The government panel overseeing the municipal divorce proceedings wants to hear from you. The Local Agency Formation Commission--which is about to embark on a study of Valley secession and will ultimately determine whether the issue is put to a citywide vote--will hold the first in a series of public hearings at 9 a.m. Wednesday at the County Hall of Administration in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nowhere in the country is there a precedent for San Fernando Valley secession. Los Angeles would be the first major American city to slice itself in two. Where, then, can architects of the proposed Valley city turn for a model? Across the Santa Susana Mountains in the 14-year-old city of Santa Clarita. It's by no means a perfect model. The San Fernando Valley, home to 1.4 million people, has nine times the population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials and proponents of San Fernando Valley secession reached tentative agreement Monday on a plan to divide parks, libraries and other assets if voters split Los Angeles apart. The plan would enable the new Valley city to acquire all municipal property within its boundaries without payment to Los Angeles, meeting a key demand of secessionists. But under the conditions attached, it could be years--perhaps decades--before Los Angeles would transfer much of the property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of San Fernando Valley secession on Monday raised new conflict-of-interest charges against the official drafting a referendum on the proposal to break apart Los Angeles. But others supported the official, Larry J. Calemine, who was a leader of an aborted Valley secession movement in the 1970s but says he is neutral now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secessionists have launched a campaign against a $600-million police bond measure, arguing Monday that San Fernando Valley residents should not pay for improvements they might not share. Valley VOTE Chairman Richard Close and Harbor Study Foundation Director Andrew Mardesich are among seven secessionists who signed the ballot argument against the proposed police bond measure, to be decided by voters in March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a throwback to the pre-Watergate era of covert money in politics, San Fernando Valley secessionists have raised hundreds of thousands of dollars from anonymous donors, and a new group fighting to keep Los Angeles together says it too will keep donor names secret. Groups on both sides of secession have been subject to almost no public disclosure of fund-raising, spending or lobbying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2001 | JULIE TAMAKI and MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The State Board of Education unanimously killed a proposal Thursday to break San Fernando Valley schools away from the Los Angeles district, keeping the issue off the ballot and ending a long campaign. The Los Angeles Unified School District has its problems, board members acknowledged, but pulling out 200,000 students would not solve them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In their first official response to the San Fernando Valley's bid to leave Los Angeles, city leaders Wednesday flatly rejected the proposal that the fates of key departments be dealt with after a secession vote. In a report to the Local Agency Formation Commission, officials said the proposal by secession group Valley VOTE to dismantle the Water and Power, Harbor and Airports departments after the secession vote would be financially reckless.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In their first official response to the San Fernando Valley's bid to leave Los Angeles, city leaders Wednesday flatly rejected a proposal by the group advocating secession to put off decisions on the future of key city departments until after an election, and expressed concerns about the fate of the city's 40,000 employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback to proponents of San Fernando Valley cityhood, lawyers for the commission planning a referendum on secession have found that Los Angeles cannot be forced to give up parks, libraries and other property without compensation. Secessionists are seeking the transfer of all city property in the Valley, along with fleets of garbage trucks, street sweepers, firetrucks and police cars. They contend that Valley taxpayers are entitled to a fair share without payment to Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The goal was clear when Mayor James K. Hahn and San Fernando Valley secessionists opened negotiations last month on the terms of a referendum: to build consensus on a plan to break apart Los Angeles. A month later, the most notable point of consensus is the lack of consensus. Yet signs have emerged that City Hall and Valley separatists could reach agreement on at least the outlines of a separation pact to put before voters in November 2002.
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