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San Fernando Valley Historical Society

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
For 50 years, the oldest historical society in the San Fernando Valley has been the caretaker of Valley history, carefully preserving everything from historical homes to antique clothing. Members of the San Fernando Valley Historical Society will celebrate their role in keeping history alive during an anniversary celebration tomorrow on the grounds of the oldest adobe home in the Valley. "That's a big landmark," said Barbara Swanson, a board member.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cheerful sound of mariachi music, the laughter of children and the smell of tri-tip roasting darkly over an open pit Sunday made it easy to imagine what life was like during the summer fiestas at the Andres Pico Adobe in the early 1800s. Charros on horseback swung graceful loops with their ropes while young girls in colorful costumes prepared to dance in the shade of half a dozen stately olive trees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cheerful sound of mariachi music, the laughter of children and the smell of tri-tip roasting darkly over an open pit Sunday made it easy to imagine what life was like during the summer fiestas at the Andres Pico Adobe in the early 1800s. Charros on horseback swung graceful loops with their ropes while young girls in colorful costumes prepared to dance in the shade of half a dozen stately olive trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1997
Long after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, local adobes are finally beginning to rebound. Constructed of sun-dried bricks made of dirt, water, sand and straw, the historic buildings were no match for the violent shaking. A celebration is planned this afternoon to mark the reopening of the Andres Pico Adobe in Mission Hills and it is hoped that by the end of the year, the Lopez Adobe in San Fernando will again be open to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1997
Long after the 1994 Northridge earthquake, local adobes are finally beginning to rebound. Constructed of sun-dried bricks made of dirt, water, sand and straw, the historic buildings were no match for the violent shaking. A celebration is planned this afternoon to mark the reopening of the Andres Pico Adobe in Mission Hills and it is hoped that by the end of the year, the Lopez Adobe in San Fernando will again be open to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a story about what might have been. Let's say you fire up your sports coupe and head down to El Camino Real in Girard. Blowing off a couple of red lights because red doesn't go with your outfit, you breeze through Runnymede and roar up to the curb in Laurelwood half an hour late for lunch with your agent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1994 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an idyllic slice of early California, all but gobbled up by Northridge's suburban growth and suddenly crippled by Mother Nature. Rancho Cordillero del Norte (Ranch of the North Ridge)--once a sheep farm on the sprawling old Mission San Fernando some 200 -years ago--is another casualty of the Northridge earthquake, which has temporarily closed several other historic sites in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys.
NEWS
September 17, 1993 | TOM JACOBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Tom Jacobs writes regularly for The Times
When the San Fernando Valley Historical Society announced its bus tour of historical sites in the West Valley, skeptics surely wondered whether it was some sort of joke. Historical sites? In the West Valley? Why not tour the beaches of Burbank or the glaciers of Glendale? Bobbette Fleschler knows better. As president of the historical society, she knows where one can find the few remaining remnants of the pre-subdivision, pre-mini-mall Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1996
A $300,000 renovation and seismic retrofitting project at the Andres Pico Adobe in Mission Hills, the second-oldest structure in the San Fernando Valley, should be completed in two months, members of a local historical society said. The adobe, which was built in 1834 and was home to Mexican Army Gen. Andres Pico, brother of the last Mexican governor of California, was closed in December 1992 so the city could begin an earthquake stabilization project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1993 | JILL LEOVY
The San Fernando Valley Historical Society will hold a benefit concert Sunday to raise money for a new computer and copy machine to replace those stolen from the society's headquarters last month. The concert, featuring The Classical Blitz, a Valley-based orchestral group, is at 5 p.m. on the lawn of Andres Pico Adobe at 10940 Sepulveda Blvd. in Mission Hills. Tickets are $7 for adults at the door; no charge for children under 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1994 | JEFF PRUGH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an idyllic slice of early California, all but gobbled up by Northridge's suburban growth and suddenly crippled by Mother Nature. Rancho Cordillero del Norte (Ranch of the North Ridge)--once a sheep farm on the sprawling old Mission San Fernando some 200 -years ago--is another casualty of the Northridge earthquake, which has temporarily closed several other historic sites in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys.
NEWS
September 17, 1993 | TOM JACOBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Tom Jacobs writes regularly for The Times
When the San Fernando Valley Historical Society announced its bus tour of historical sites in the West Valley, skeptics surely wondered whether it was some sort of joke. Historical sites? In the West Valley? Why not tour the beaches of Burbank or the glaciers of Glendale? Bobbette Fleschler knows better. As president of the historical society, she knows where one can find the few remaining remnants of the pre-subdivision, pre-mini-mall Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
For 50 years, the oldest historical society in the San Fernando Valley has been the caretaker of Valley history, carefully preserving everything from historical homes to antique clothing. Members of the San Fernando Valley Historical Society will celebrate their role in keeping history alive during an anniversary celebration tomorrow on the grounds of the oldest adobe home in the Valley. "That's a big landmark," said Barbara Swanson, a board member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a story about what might have been. Let's say you fire up your sports coupe and head down to El Camino Real in Girard. Blowing off a couple of red lights because red doesn't go with your outfit, you breeze through Runnymede and roar up to the curb in Laurelwood half an hour late for lunch with your agent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1994 | TIM MAY
On Jan. 22, at 1:30 p.m., peace will break out. On that date, local historical associations and city agencies will team up to commemorate a monumental peace treaty, the Campo de Cahuenga Treaty, which ended the Mexican-American War in California and paved the way for California and the Western states to join the Union. The event is free and open to the public, and is sponsored by the Campo de Cahuenga Historical Memorial Assn.
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