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San Fernando Valley Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent evening in the city's Mid-Wilshire district, half a dozen small pickup trucks rolled up to the curb in front of a nondescript apartment building. The occupants bailed out and huddled on the sidewalk--"roll call" for the Toyota gang. One by one, the trucks drove into the night, most bound for the San Fernando Valley, where they would meander side streets and alleyways, prowling for metal to steal. "It's like a shopping mall for thieves out there," said LAPD Det.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One after the other, they took turns at the microphones, 12 business managers, educators and public officials. Focused and well-informed, uniformed in the understated attire of professionals, they assayed the complicated process of getting welfare recipients into paying jobs. In the audience, less than 10 feet from the podium, Cheryl Coleman sat waiting. She wore a navy blue jersey-and-slacks ensemble, and large silvery earrings.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When it comes to the current technology boom, the San Fernando Valley and Ventura County are perhaps the region's best-kept secrets. Head north along the Ventura Freeway, where the suburban sprawl and industrial landscape give way to rolling hills and bedroom communities. There are several big players on this side of the hill--think GTE and biotechnology giant Amgen. No single field drives the growth in this increasingly diverse region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997 | DADE HAYES
Organizers of the new Machine Tool Partnership Academy at Van Nuys High School do not hesitate to say that in addition to better paving the road to college, the magnet-style program's main purpose is to land students jobs. "It appeals to students who like to work with their hands, who like having a sense of accomplishment," said Roberto Gutierrez, who helped develop the academy and who works with at-risk teenagers with the nonprofit New Directions for Youth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997
Organizers of the new Machine Tool Partnership Academy at Van Nuys High School do not hesitate to say that in addition to paving a road to college, the magnet-style program's main purpose is to help students land jobs. "It appeals to students who like to work with their hands, who like having a sense of accomplishment," said Roberto Gutierrez, who helped develop the academy and works with at-risk teenagers with the nonprofit New Directions for Youth.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Recessions don't just end, they peter out. 1996 in the San Fernando Valley was a case in point: Optimism abounded, but genuine economic growth remained elusive and many business people had to be content with hopes of a recovery on its way--though not, apparently, in any hurry. "Everyone is expecting a recovery . . . but it's not showing up," said Shirley Svorny, economics professor and director of the new Center for the Study of the San Fernando Valley Economy at Cal State Northridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1996 | JULIE SHEER
Certain film stars are a director's dream. These actors are easygoing, don't throw temper tantrums and won't complain about uncomplimentary camera angles. You'll never hear them whine--except when they're programmed to. That's because they're animatronic, the mechanical brain-children of today's hottest special effects wizards, combining animationa and electronics to bring Hollywood critters to life.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1995 | RUTH SHAER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Convinced there was still money to be made in the Southern California aerospace industry, a few years ago French entrepreneur Michel Szostak raised $1 million from an investor friend in France and started a small airline fastener company in Sylmar. He purchased the machines he needed to make the little bolts that help hold aircraft engines together and opened M.S. Aerospace in June, 1992. The company thrived until the Northridge earthquake last January.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1995 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nineteen ninety-four will be remembered as a poor year on Wall Street, with most national stock indexes down slightly, but it was an even worse year for local stocks. The composite index of 107 stocks in the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Conejo valleys dropped 5% during 1994, according to Media General Financial Services, a Richmond, Va., firm that compiles the list for The Times.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1994 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Northridge temblor that hammered the region in January is still shaking the business community as the year draws to a close. Retailers, contractors, insurers and a host of large and small businesses whose livelihood depends on a local customer base have all been coping with its aftereffects. To be sure, the earthquake wasn't the only big business story in the San Fernando Valley this year. Aerospace and defense industry downsizing continued to plague the region.
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