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San Fernando Valley Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
Concerned about the high concentration of nickel-plating firms in the San Fernando Valley, a City Council panel asked Tuesday for a report on limiting their location near residential neighborhoods. Councilman Hal Bernson, chairman of the Planning and Land Use Management Committee, said his recent appointment to the South Coast Air Quality Management District has helped educate him about the health hazards of fumes from nickel-plating companies.
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BUSINESS
December 7, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
In another sign of the growing high-tech industry along the San Fernando Valley's 101 corridor, the Torrance-based Software Council of Southern California will establish a Valley chapter early next year. The new chapter's first meeting is scheduled for Jan. 12 in Woodland Hills and will feature a keynote speech by Brian Farrell, president and chief executive of interactive entertainment software developer THQ of Calabasas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1998 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Valley businesses, particularly those in the growing high-tech sector, are poised to prosper in the coming years, even as the economic crisis in Asia prompts some firms to rethink investment in that troubled region. Those were the conclusions of a group of panelists focusing on the Valley's economic future at the 10th annual VICA business forecast conference held Friday in Woodland Hills.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drawn by a large pool of skilled and unskilled workers, manufacturers are taking another look at the San Fernando Valley, fueling a budding resurgence in the area's declining industrial sector. That was the assessment a commercial real estate developer delivered to a group of business leaders Wednesday, expanding upon a new report that gave an upbeat analysis of the Valley's economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1998 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent evening in the city's Mid-Wilshire district, half a dozen small pickup trucks rolled up to the curb in front of a nondescript apartment building. The occupants bailed out and huddled on the sidewalk--"roll call" for the Toyota gang. One by one, the trucks drove into the night, most bound for the San Fernando Valley, where they would meander side streets and alleyways, prowling for metal to steal. "It's like a shopping mall for thieves out there," said LAPD Det.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1998 | JAMES RICCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One after the other, they took turns at the microphones, 12 business managers, educators and public officials. Focused and well-informed, uniformed in the understated attire of professionals, they assayed the complicated process of getting welfare recipients into paying jobs. In the audience, less than 10 feet from the podium, Cheryl Coleman sat waiting. She wore a navy blue jersey-and-slacks ensemble, and large silvery earrings.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When it comes to the current technology boom, the San Fernando Valley and Ventura County are perhaps the region's best-kept secrets. Head north along the Ventura Freeway, where the suburban sprawl and industrial landscape give way to rolling hills and bedroom communities. There are several big players on this side of the hill--think GTE and biotechnology giant Amgen. No single field drives the growth in this increasingly diverse region.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to complaints from employers that they cannot find workers with the skills to fill an increasingly technical job market, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday approved a $300,000 survey of San Fernando Valley businesses to address what leaders see as a critical problem. Lawmakers and business leaders say the skills gap is a regionwide concern that has made it difficult for Southern California to attract and keep high-paying jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997 | DADE HAYES
Organizers of the new Machine Tool Partnership Academy at Van Nuys High School do not hesitate to say that in addition to better paving the road to college, the magnet-style program's main purpose is to land students jobs. "It appeals to students who like to work with their hands, who like having a sense of accomplishment," said Roberto Gutierrez, who helped develop the academy and who works with at-risk teenagers with the nonprofit New Directions for Youth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997
Organizers of the new Machine Tool Partnership Academy at Van Nuys High School do not hesitate to say that in addition to paving a road to college, the magnet-style program's main purpose is to help students land jobs. "It appeals to students who like to work with their hands, who like having a sense of accomplishment," said Roberto Gutierrez, who helped develop the academy and works with at-risk teenagers with the nonprofit New Directions for Youth.
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