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San Fernando Valley Japanese Language Institute

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 83-year-old Barry Tamura attended the San Fernando Valley Japanese Language Institute in the 1920s, Japanese American farmers and flower growers were scattered across the northeast Valley. Most of his 79 classmates in 1924--the year the school was founded--were nisei, or second-generation Japanese Americans, who spoke Japanese at home and attended the school mainly to master kanji--the complex writing system of their forebears.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 83-year-old Barry Tamura attended the San Fernando Valley Japanese Language Institute in the 1920s, Japanese American farmers and flower growers were scattered across the northeast Valley. Most of his 79 classmates in 1924--the year the school was founded--were nisei, or second-generation Japanese Americans, who spoke Japanese at home and attended the school mainly to master kanji--the complex writing system of their forebears.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1991 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley Japanese American Community Center in Pacoima has offered a $500 reward for the vandals who have been breaking its windows and spray-painting graffiti on its walls for more than a year. Both police and center officials said they do not believe the vandalism is racially motivated, but rather the work of adolescents--possibly gang members--from the neighborhood.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, Szymanski is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
Ten-year-old Albert Kuo would rather spend Saturday mornings watching cartoons or flying his kite with friends from Serrania Avenue Elementary School in Woodland Hills. Instead, he is drawing Chinese characters, speaking Mandarin and perfecting a mean game of Ping-Pong at the Chinese School held at James Monroe High School in Sepulveda, where he is known as Kuo Chun-Yu.
NEWS
April 28, 1988 | MICHELE LINGRE
In Monique Lough's class at Le Lycee International de Los Angeles, a French-American school in Van Nuys, 11 first-graders are halfway through a reading lesson, deciphering words on the chalkboard. " Es-car-got, " Sabrina Cockrell, 6 reads. " Oui , and what does the snail carry on its back?" Lough asks in French. " Un shell," says an anonymous voice. " En Francais ," Lough answers. " Une coquille ," says Audrey Craitin, 6, from the back of the classroom.
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