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San Fernando Valley Jazz Festival

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley has long been known as a center for world-class jazz musicians--but more as a place to live than to perform live. A group of veteran performers and promoters want to change all that. Today they will announce the first annual San Fernando Valley Jazz Festival, a six-week series of concerts, competitions and educational programs set to begin April 6.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley has long been known as a center for world-class jazz musicians--but more as a place to live than to perform live. A group of veteran performers and promoters want to change all that. Today they will announce the first annual San Fernando Valley Jazz Festival, a six-week series of concerts, competitions and educational programs set to begin April 6.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Jazz bands from nine San Fernando Valley high schools will compete this weekend for a chance to perform in the first-ever San Fernando Valley Jazz Festival in May at Lake Balboa. Both the competition and the jazz festival--named Jazz on the Lake--are sponsored by the Woodland Hills Chamber of Commerce and the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The San Fernando Valley Jazz Festival. Sound strange? Well, sure it does. After all, it hasn't been done before and the Valley is not exactly recognized as a jazz Mecca. But "Jazz on the Lake," the Valley's first jazz festival--44 hours of nonstop music on three outdoor stages around Lake Balboa in Encino--hopes to change all that. The event, which runs from noon to 10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, is presenting a kaleidoscope of jazz in a colorful, outdoor atmosphere.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1997 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who says that aging musicians--the ones who grew up listening to and playing that timeless big-band music--have to store away their instruments and pack up their dancing shoes? Still showcasing the sound that dominated most of their young adult years, the Los Angeles Police Department's Jazz Band, whose average member is around age 62 and retired, continues to produce spirited jazz that often tempts even the most rigid audience members to shake their hips or make a beeline for the dance floor.
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