Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSan Fernando Valley Labor
IN THE NEWS

San Fernando Valley Labor

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drawn by a large pool of skilled and unskilled workers, manufacturers are taking another look at the San Fernando Valley, fueling a budding resurgence in the area's declining industrial sector. That was the assessment a commercial real estate developer delivered to a group of business leaders Wednesday, expanding upon a new report that gave an upbeat analysis of the Valley's economy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drawn by a large pool of skilled and unskilled workers, manufacturers are taking another look at the San Fernando Valley, fueling a budding resurgence in the area's declining industrial sector. That was the assessment a commercial real estate developer delivered to a group of business leaders Wednesday, expanding upon a new report that gave an upbeat analysis of the Valley's economy.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 8, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across the street from the United Auto Workers' hall in North Hollywood stands a 50-foot-high rock pile. To Jerry Augustine, financial secretary of UAW Local 179, it is a bitter sign of what has happened to his labor union in the past few years. The pile is all that is left of a once-bustling factory that provided high-paying jobs for hundreds of UAW members, before Bendix shifted much of that work to non-union facilities elsewhere and then earlier this year crushed the plant into pieces.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It only took a second for Mark Nguyen to calculate what Friday's proposed change in overtime rules would mean for him. "It means I lose," said the 23-year-old salesman for JC Penney Co. in Northridge. Supporters of Friday's historic recommendation to do away with the state's 79-year-old overtime rules say it could benefit both workers and management. But in the San Fernando Valley, hourly wage-earners were more likely to react with dejection and frustration--even as their bosses applauded.
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It only took a second for Mark Nguyen to calculate what Friday's proposed change in overtime rules would mean for him. "It means I lose," said the 23-year-old salesman for JC Penney Co. in Northridge. Supporters of Friday's historic recommendation to do away with the state's 79-year-old overtime rules say it could benefit both workers and management. But in the San Fernando Valley, hourly wage-earners were more likely to react with dejection and frustration--even as their bosses applauded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1995
Labor Day has long been observed with exceptional fervor in the San Fernando Valley. Parades marked the holiday, and underscored the influence of organized labor in a region top-heavy with manufacturing and aerospace industries. The same was true throughout the state: From the 1950s on, California had a higher percentage of unionized workers than the nation as a whole, said UCLA labor relations professor Daniel J.B. Mitchell. But with the aerospace downturn, change was sharp and sudden.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1993 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Transamerica Insurance Group's planned move to the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, detailed by the Woodland Hills company last week, was a milestone of sorts. It pushed the number of announced job losses in the San Fernando Valley to more than 10,000 over the past three years, according to the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. Of that total, more than 2,000 job losses have been announced just since January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1985 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
In what has been described as a classic example of community organization, a tenant committee has emerged from a mass of unorganized Northridge residents who four weeks ago had no idea that their homes were threatened by an unprecedented city neighborhood renewal plan.
OPINION
June 8, 2008 | Anthony York, Anthony York is the editor of Capitol Weekly, a newspaper of California government and politics.
Tuesday's primary election cost the state and counties an estimated $100 million, and it produced the lowest turnout since records have been kept. Less than 25% of registered California voters bothered to vote, according to the secretary of state's office. The turnout was so dismal because the state's presidential primary had been split off and moved up to Feb. 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1988 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
Federal agents converged Wednesday morning on a Sylmar street corner where day laborers congregate and arrested 43 suspected illegal aliens, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1995
Labor Day has long been observed with exceptional fervor in the San Fernando Valley. Parades marked the holiday, and underscored the influence of organized labor in a region top-heavy with manufacturing and aerospace industries. The same was true throughout the state: From the 1950s on, California had a higher percentage of unionized workers than the nation as a whole, said UCLA labor relations professor Daniel J.B. Mitchell. But with the aerospace downturn, change was sharp and sudden.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1993 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Transamerica Insurance Group's planned move to the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, detailed by the Woodland Hills company last week, was a milestone of sorts. It pushed the number of announced job losses in the San Fernando Valley to more than 10,000 over the past three years, according to the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. Of that total, more than 2,000 job losses have been announced just since January.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across the street from the United Auto Workers' hall in North Hollywood stands a 50-foot-high rock pile. To Jerry Augustine, financial secretary of UAW Local 179, it is a bitter sign of what has happened to his labor union in the past few years. The pile is all that is left of a once-bustling factory that provided high-paying jobs for hundreds of UAW members, before Bendix shifted much of that work to non-union facilities elsewhere and then earlier this year crushed the plant into pieces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety has given special treatment to dozens of construction projects sought by political insiders, including nine current and former city commissioners and donors to the mayor and City Council, records show. The department assigned the projects to the little-known Case Management Unit set up years ago to speed large and complex construction jobs, such as public schools and affordable housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1986 | THOMAS OMESTAD, Times Staff Writer
The oddly-shaped 21st Congressional District remains what political map makers in 1981 envisioned--a conservative bastion and one of the safest districts in the country for the Republican Party. The GOP candidate in the November election, Elton Gallegly, fits the district's mold precisely. The conservative mayor of Simi Valley, a city of 93,000, takes his cues from President Reagan. His principal challenger, Vice Mayor Gilbert R.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|