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San Fernando Valley Landmarks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
Surf the Valley. Impossible? Try cyberspace. Net surfers can now explore a list of recreation opportunities available in the San Fernando Valley via an electronic visitors guide. Located on the World Wide Web at http://www.sfvalley.org/visitors/, the resource was initially created to spotlight the Valley's motion picture and television studios, said Ellen Fitzmaurice, telecommunication project director for the Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley and the site's architect.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends and neighbors of the San Fernando Valley's first 24-hour fire station paid a visit Saturday to old Station 39 in Van Nuys to honor three firefighters who once worked there and died in the line of duty. Twenty years ago, firefighter Lynn Hazlett was killed while battling a blaze. His son John, who was born two weeks after his father's death, made his first visit Saturday to Station 39 to witness the dedication of a memorial plaque to his dad and two other firemen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
In 1849, it was one of the first homes in the San Fernando Valley that could be visited by weary travelers heading west. Today, it is not even fit for tourists. Because the Northridge earthquake caused more than $1.5 million in structural damages, the ancient rancho that once housed Valley families and cattle ranchers is barely standing in what is now Los Encinos State Historic Park, 16756 Moorpark St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997 | DADE HAYES
San Fernando Valley residents seeking a connection to their hometown are likely to find it at a lecture Monday on "Valley Historic Landmarks" at the Valley College Historical Museum. Local historian Malcolm Sears, who taught vocational agriculture classes at Canoga Park High School for 33 years, will take the audience on a virtual tour of the Valley's notable addresses and recall the personalities that shaped the area. "He was almost born here in Van Nuys," museum official Austin Conover said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends and neighbors of the San Fernando Valley's first 24-hour fire station paid a visit Saturday to old Station 39 in Van Nuys to honor three firefighters who once worked there and died in the line of duty. Twenty years ago, firefighter Lynn Hazlett was killed while battling a blaze. His son John, who was born two weeks after his father's death, made his first visit Saturday to Station 39 to witness the dedication of a memorial plaque to his dad and two other firemen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In 1849, by his own recollection, Vicente de la Ossa paid 100 pesos and "many obligations" for the first of several purchases that by 1857 would make him sole owner of the 4,460-acre Rancho Los Encinos, which he named Rancho El Encino. Upon acquiring the land, which had been originally granted as a parcel by the Spanish governor of California in 1789, De la Ossa immediately set to work on the construction of a nine-room adobe ranch house next to a natural spring on the property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1996
A $300,000 renovation and seismic retrofitting project at the Andres Pico Adobe in Mission Hills, the second-oldest structure in the San Fernando Valley, should be completed in two months, members of a local historical society said. The adobe, which was built in 1834 and was home to Mexican Army Gen. Andres Pico, brother of the last Mexican governor of California, was closed in December 1992 so the city could begin an earthquake stabilization project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
Peering out from stagecoach windows, weary travelers making their way from Los Angeles to San Francisco in the mid-1800s would come upon a welcome sight when they reached the northeast San Fernando Valley. Situated among the cattle and wild mustard was Lopez Station, where the stage stopped twice a week until 1874, when it was replaced by the railroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1993 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fire that may have been started by squatters destroyed the old Canoga Park railroad station Tuesday, foiling efforts by the Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society to purchase the station and turn it into a museum. Beth Shirley, founding president of the Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society, said the old station--built in 1912 and listed in the city's register of historical landmarks--was the oldest remaining depot in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1996
After months of delays caused by wrangling over the cost of earthquake repairs, work is scheduled to begin within the next few months on the historic Lopez Adobe in San Fernando. The 115-year-old landmark has been closed to the public since the January 1994 Northridge earthquake, when the building's chimney and part of the roof collapsed. In March 1995, the city hired a historic preservation firm to perform an inventory of the building's furnishings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
Peering out from stagecoach windows, weary travelers making their way from Los Angeles to San Francisco in the mid-1800s would come upon a welcome sight when they reached the northeast San Fernando Valley. Situated among the cattle and wild mustard was Lopez Station, where the stage stopped twice a week until 1874, when it was replaced by the railroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In 1849, by his own recollection, Vicente de la Ossa paid 100 pesos and "many obligations" for the first of several purchases that by 1857 would make him sole owner of the 4,460-acre Rancho Los Encinos, which he named Rancho El Encino. Upon acquiring the land, which had been originally granted as a parcel by the Spanish governor of California in 1789, De la Ossa immediately set to work on the construction of a nine-room adobe ranch house next to a natural spring on the property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
Surf the Valley. Impossible? Try cyberspace. Net surfers can now explore a list of recreation opportunities available in the San Fernando Valley via an electronic visitors guide. Located on the World Wide Web at http://www.sfvalley.org/visitors/, the resource was initially created to spotlight the Valley's motion picture and television studios, said Ellen Fitzmaurice, telecommunication project director for the Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley and the site's architect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1996
After months of delays caused by wrangling over the cost of earthquake repairs, work is scheduled to begin within the next few months on the historic Lopez Adobe in San Fernando. The 115-year-old landmark has been closed to the public since the January 1994 Northridge earthquake, when the building's chimney and part of the roof collapsed. In March 1995, the city hired a historic preservation firm to perform an inventory of the building's furnishings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1996
A $300,000 renovation and seismic retrofitting project at the Andres Pico Adobe in Mission Hills, the second-oldest structure in the San Fernando Valley, should be completed in two months, members of a local historical society said. The adobe, which was built in 1834 and was home to Mexican Army Gen. Andres Pico, brother of the last Mexican governor of California, was closed in December 1992 so the city could begin an earthquake stabilization project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1995
With support from the likes of actor Jack Nicholson and musician Don Henley, the city's Mulholland Scenic Parkway Design Review Board voted this week to seek placement of a nine-mile unpaved stretch of Mulholland Drive in Tarzana known as "Dirt Mulholland" on the National Register of Historic Places. The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy also favored the nomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997 | DADE HAYES
San Fernando Valley residents seeking a connection to their hometown are likely to find it at a lecture Monday on "Valley Historic Landmarks" at the Valley College Historical Museum. Local historian Malcolm Sears, who taught vocational agriculture classes at Canoga Park High School for 33 years, will take the audience on a virtual tour of the Valley's notable addresses and recall the personalities that shaped the area. "He was almost born here in Van Nuys," museum official Austin Conover said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1995
With support from the likes of actor Jack Nicholson and musician Don Henley, the city's Mulholland Scenic Parkway Design Review Board voted this week to seek placement of a nine-mile unpaved stretch of Mulholland Drive in Tarzana known as "Dirt Mulholland" on the National Register of Historic Places. The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy also favored the nomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
In 1849, it was one of the first homes in the San Fernando Valley that could be visited by weary travelers heading west. Today, it is not even fit for tourists. Because the Northridge earthquake caused more than $1.5 million in structural damages, the ancient rancho that once housed Valley families and cattle ranchers is barely standing in what is now Los Encinos State Historic Park, 16756 Moorpark St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1993 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fire that may have been started by squatters destroyed the old Canoga Park railroad station Tuesday, foiling efforts by the Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society to purchase the station and turn it into a museum. Beth Shirley, founding president of the Canoga-Owensmouth Historical Society, said the old station--built in 1912 and listed in the city's register of historical landmarks--was the oldest remaining depot in the San Fernando Valley.
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