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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It has been a year of historic new developments and quiet last hurrahs in San Fernando Valley politics. While Valley secession boosters advanced, longtime leaders such as Joel Wachs, Hal Bernson and John Ferraro were being elected to the City Council for the final time before term limits force them from office.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new plan for a San Fernando Valley city that would remain deeply dependent on Los Angeles has demoralized some of secession's most ardent supporters and left them wondering if their campaign is dead. Secessionist Polly Ward of Studio City called it "a recipe for disaster" that would doom the movement. "We'd be better off staying as part of Los Angeles than to accept this," said Ward, one of several leaders of the Valley VOTE secession group who are no longer sure they will support cityhood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1991 | PAUL LIEBERMAN and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State Sen. Alan Robbins drove through the gates of his Encino estate, then down the hills to the floor of the Valley, arriving at 10 a.m. at his district office in the heart of Van Nuys, where he would break the news to his staff. Here, they didn't call it a resignation or a guilty plea. "An apology," an aide called it. Some cried as he told them that he had but two hours remaining in office, but not Robbins himself. "He's taking it well," one person who was present said later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tony Cardenas made the rounds at Los Angeles City Hall last month to promote his candidacy for City Council, he was guided by an intense man with a walrus-style mustache who knows well how to navigate the halls of power. He was James Acevedo--San Fernando Valley political operative, lobbyist, government contractor, developer, power broker. Acevedo, 49, finds himself at the center of an expanding Latino political coalition that reaches into City Hall and Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1996 | JOHN GLIONNA / Times Staff Writer
Call it the story of Mr. Cardenas goes to the state Capitol. Tony Cardenas, the 33-year-old political newcomer from Mission Hills, who on Monday was officially sworn in as the first Latino state legislator from the San Fernando Valley, spent Sunday afternoon trying his new digs out for size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1998 | BOB RECTOR, Bob Rector is op-ed editor for the Valley and Ventura County editions
Richard Quevedo is co-chairman of the Southwest Voter Project's program to register Latino voters in the San Fernando Valley. Using volunteers, the group is blanketing schools, churches and shopping areas to register as many eligible Latino voters as possible in time for the June and November elections, an effort that could significantly alter Valley voting and political demographics. Quevedo recently talked about his group's efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Divided over hot-button issues involving San Fernando Valley independence, Los Angeles City Council candidates Corinne Sanchez and Alex Padilla say voters in the northeast Valley's 7th District have some very clear choices. Both candidates say the working-class district has not received its fair share of basic city services--from police protection to tree trimming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Due to "an anomaly" in California's campaign laws, the group pushing for a study and possible vote on San Fernando Valley secession is not required to disclose finances, expenditures or contributors--but it could be, according to a report by the city's Ethics Commission. The report offers no recommendations on whether secession group Valley VOTE should be made to reveal its financial backers. However, it concludes that Los Angeles leaders have the power to force disclosure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to dramatically reduce the cost of studying San Fernando Valley secession, Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky on Wednesday unveiled a plan calling for increased cooperation between the city and the activists working to break up Los Angeles. The group advocating secession, Valley VOTE, hailed the plan, saying it could trim millions from the cost of studying the municipal divorce, which had been estimated to run as high as $8 million. That figure was disclosed last month in a county analysis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the "other" Los Angeles City Council races for San Fernando Valley seats, three low-profile contests that pit prominent, well-financed incumbents against little-known challengers. Each contrasts with the 7th District race in the April 13 primary, a free-for-all that has split the political establishment and that observers predict will require a runoff election on June 8. Council President John Ferraro is running against construction supervisor Benjamin D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2001 | RICHARD FAUSSET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its promise of a responsive little soviet in every corner of Los Angeles, the neighborhood council concept wasn't just meant to devolve power to the people. It was also meant to cool secession fever in the San Fernando Valley. So what are Valley secessionists doing now that it's time to form the councils? Some secession advocates, such as Richard Close, are simply refusing to participate in the formation process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the San Fernando Valley cityhood group said Friday that Los Angeles City Council President Alex Padilla should be ousted because of his removal of Councilman Hal Bernson from a panel studying secession. Valley VOTE President Jeff Brain, who now lives in Glendale, sent an e-mail to dozens of the group's supporters asking whether they would support such a campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans for the election of a pioneer government to run a new San Fernando Valley city offer a preview of the political upheaval that would be sparked next year by breaking apart Los Angeles. The election of the Valley's first mayor and City Council could take place at the same time as the proposed secession referendum in November 2002, and it already poses problems for cityhood planners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening a new front in the war over municipal divorce, city officials contended Friday in a report that secession would risk serious financial damage to both a new San Fernando Valley city and the rest of Los Angeles. The city's first formal study of secession was a setback for Valley cityhood proponents, who want the issue on the November 2002 ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The many San Fernando Valley political leaders who helped engineer mayor-elect James Hahn's victory are already looking forward to reaping the benefits. Hahn won the Valley by 54.7%, compared with 53.5% citywide, according to a Times analysis of returns. In Northridge and Granada Hills, he won 67% of the vote, one of the largest margins in the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO and JEAN GUCCIONE and CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like strategists preparing for battle, Damon Moore and Robert Craig pored over a map of a Van Nuys neighborhood and a list of local union members who had not yet voted. It was election day, and the union duo had been at it nearly two hours, chatting up residents in the cause of Antonio Villaraigosa for mayor. With 10 minutes left until the polling place down the street at Van Nuys High School would close, they approached a final house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A panel of experts on San Fernando Valley secession agreed Tuesday the road to municipal divorce will be long and contentious before a vote can take place. Within the next few weeks, a nine-member commission will decide how it will tackle the monumental task of divvying up the city's assets in a way that would allow both members of the broken partnership to survive new and separate lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando Valley voters played a decisive role in the defeat of the proposed $744-million bond issue for police and fire stations. In the four all-Valley council districts, 52.5% of the 66,765 voters opposed Proposition 1, according to unofficial returns from the city clerk's office. Of the 152,335 people voting in the city's 11 other council districts, 66.9% supported the bond measure, just over the two-thirds needed for passage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the sidelines of a boisterous cricket game in Woodley Avenue Park, where men knock back beer from red plastic cups, nobody is talking about compressed work schedules for police officers. The scheduling debate--a recent flash point in the Los Angeles mayoral race--isn't much of a conversation item among joggers circling Balboa Lake, either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Margaret Guyer didn't need to read the latest 380-page study of city services in the San Fernando Valley to know what it found--that her Sylmar neighborhood and the rest of the Valley's residents are not getting services to match the taxes they pay. Guyer has firsthand experience in trying unsuccessfully to get the city to pick up stray dogs, remove abandoned cars and fix cracked sidewalks to confirm what page after page of the financial report found.
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