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San Fernando Valley Population

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994
African Americans have never been a large segment of the San Fernando Valley's population, and in recent years their numbers have stayed relatively constant even as other ethnic communities in the Valley rose or fell. African Americans make up about 4% of the Valley population, compared to 10.6% of the population countywide.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO and MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fueled by an explosive growth of Latinos, a new San Fernando Valley city, split from Los Angeles, would be home to a nearly equal number of Latinos and whites, according to an analysis of 2000 census data by The Times. Whites lost their majority status among the 1.4 million residents of the Valley, the census shows. Whites now make up at least 42% of the Valley population and 23% in the remainder of Los Angeles; Latinos make up 39% of the Valley and 45% of the rest of Los Angeles.
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NEWS
May 6, 1991 | FRANK CLIFFORD and ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles County documented in the 1990 Census is a metropolis in motion, a place where dramatic population shifts are breaking down old strongholds of racial and ethnic separatism but perhaps laying the foundation for new ones. The traditional boundaries have blurred in a variety of ways. An expanding Latino population has begun to overtake black majorities in Watts and other areas of South-Central Los Angeles, while challenging Anglo dominance of several San Fernando Valley communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO and MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fueled by an explosive growth in the number of Latinos, a new San Fernando Valley city, split from Los Angeles, would be home to nearly equal numbers of Latinos and whites, according to an analysis of 2000 census data by The Times. Whites have lost their majority status among the 1.4 million residents of the Valley, the census shows. Whites now make up at least 42% of the Valley population and 23% of the rest of Los Angeles; Latinos make up 39% of the Valley and 45% of the rest of Los Angeles.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Jewish community--the third-largest in the world--now numbers just over 519,000, with steady migration from around the nation and the world offsetting a relatively low birthrate, according to the first census of the area's Jewish population in nearly two decades. While migration has helped keep the area's Jewish population steady since the late 1970s, the Jewish community's center of gravity has increasingly moved westward over the past 20 years.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | ALICIA DI RADO and STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two Antelope Valley cities and one in the San Fernando Valley were among the 10 fastest-growing municipalities in Los Angeles County in population last year, according to estimates by the state Department of Finance. Palmdale led all county cities between January, 1992, and January, 1993. Its population grew from 84,135 to 89,717, or 6.6%, figures indicated. Lancaster was in second place with a 3% increase, from 104,532 to 107,675. Calabasas was 10th, with a 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1994
Will the day ever come when mail is postmarked "San Fernando Valley, CA"? Many Valley residents already feel separate from Los Angeles. And many non-Valley urbanites view the Valley the same way. Actual secession has even been discussed in the past. In terms of size and services, the Valley could certainly hold its own against other large cities. If it were a city, the Valley's population size would rank sixth in the country. It would cover about the same square-mile area as Chicago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1993
Asian-Americans are the fast est-growing segment of the U.S. population, a trend that mirrored in the San Fernando Valley. According to the 1990 Census, the Asian-American community, which includes a small number of Pacific Islanders, more than doubled to nearly 100,000 residents in the Valley during the past decade. In the nation as a whole, it increased 95%. The census found that Asian-Americans have grabbed an important share of the economic pie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
When Ernani Bernardi was first elected to the Los Angeles City Council in 1961, John F. Kennedy was President and actor Ronald Reagan and police lieutenant Tom Bradley had not yet embarked on their political careers. And Jules S. Bagneris III was 8 months old. Bagneris, the bright, energetic president of the Lake View Terrace Home Owners Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2000 | KARIMA HAYNES and SORAYA NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From storefront churches along Van Nuys Boulevard to the homeless in shelters, everyone in the San Fernando Valley needs to be counted, census officials said Friday during the grand opening of local census offices. "Every living, breathing person matters," said Michael N. Carpenter, local census office manager in Van Nuys. "We count everybody and everybody counts."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Population increases and a lack of construction are going to make the already tight apartment market in the northeast San Fernando Valley even tighter, industry experts say. A recent study by the Real Estate Center at the Anderson School at UCLA projects the northeast Valley and East Los Angeles to be the two fastest-growing parts of Los Angeles County from now until 2005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like soldiers getting a pep talk before battle, the community activists were reminded of the importance of their census work before they hit the street Saturday morning. "In poor communities, my people are humble and think they don't matter. You have to look them in the eye and tell them they do matter," Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar) told the 40 or so volunteers. "Now is a time of sacrifice. Believe me, it will come back to you 10 times."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2000 | KARIMA HAYNES and SORAYA NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From storefront churches along Van Nuys Boulevard to the homeless in shelters, everyone in the San Fernando Valley needs to be counted, census officials said Friday during the grand opening of local census offices. "Every living, breathing person matters," said Michael N. Carpenter, local census office manager in Van Nuys. "We count everybody and everybody counts."
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Jewish community--the third-largest in the world--now numbers just over 519,000, with steady migration from around the nation and the world offsetting a relatively low birthrate, according to the first census of the area's Jewish population in nearly two decades. While migration has helped keep the area's Jewish population steady since the late 1970s, the Jewish community's center of gravity has increasingly moved westward over the past 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1995 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late 1950s, armed with a realtor's license and a strong desire to succeed, James Robinson began selling homes in a tiny area of Pacoima in the northeast San Fernando Valley--the only part of the Valley in which African Americans were welcome. Then, ignoring the unspoken racial covenants of the day, Robinson began selling homes to blacks in formerly segregated Valley neighborhoods during the early 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1994
Will the day ever come when mail is postmarked "San Fernando Valley, CA"? Many Valley residents already feel separate from Los Angeles. And many non-Valley urbanites view the Valley the same way. Actual secession has even been discussed in the past. In terms of size and services, the Valley could certainly hold its own against other large cities. If it were a city, the Valley's population size would rank sixth in the country. It would cover about the same square-mile area as Chicago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO and MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fueled by an explosive growth of Latinos, a new San Fernando Valley city, split from Los Angeles, would be home to a nearly equal number of Latinos and whites, according to an analysis of 2000 census data by The Times. Whites lost their majority status among the 1.4 million residents of the Valley, the census shows. Whites now make up at least 42% of the Valley population and 23% in the remainder of Los Angeles; Latinos make up 39% of the Valley and 45% of the rest of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immigration in the San Fernando Valley has in 10 years dramatically changed the faces and fortunes of the residents of what was once one of America's quintessential suburbs. And as more immigrants arrive to pursue a new life, barriers both invisible and marked are dividing once shared neighborhoods--separating rich and poor, educated and uneducated, native-born and foreigner, English-speaking and bilingual, according to 1990 U.S. census results released this spring and analyzed by The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994
African Americans have never been a large segment of the San Fernando Valley's population, and in recent years their numbers have stayed relatively constant even as other ethnic communities in the Valley rose or fell. African Americans make up about 4% of the Valley population, compared to 10.6% of the population countywide.
NEWS
December 20, 1993 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of California's least known but most ambitious educational reforms is taking shape at half a dozen city schools in the poorest corner of the San Fernando Valley. The program has little to do with the three Rs, though it's founded on simple arithmetic. Officials at the six schools say most of their 7,400 students are eligible for state Medi-Cal benefits, but few receive them.
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