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San Fernando Valley Reconstruction

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NEWS
July 16, 1995 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months after the Northridge earthquake toppled their homes and wrenched their psyches, two-thirds of the residents in the hard-hit San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys have returned to life as usual, although one in four reports lingering financial woes that leave many of them strapped for enough money to complete repairs on their homes. A new Times Poll shows that for the most part, the costliest natural calamity in U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a delightful enough place for a stroll--a wide, outdoor arcade paved in muted tones of concrete aggregate flanked by ferns and other tropical greenery spilling over raised planters. A high, transparent dome blunts the midday sun, yet allows the long path to be bathed in light. Glass elevators quietly slip up and down, offering their brief glimpse of the world from varying heights. Welcome to the parking garage.
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NEWS
July 18, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minority business aided by a federally funded program have received more than $1 billion dollars in earthquake-related work in the 18 months since the Northridge temblor struck, city officials said Monday. The $1.1 billion translates to the creation of about 21,000 jobs and is nearly triple the goal set by the public-private partnership program, according to officials at the city's Office of Economic Development. "From a 6.8-magnitude tragedy comes a $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1997 | GREG SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation last saw the area as a heap of wreckage, glass shards and splintered beams, during a time of great devastation. It was a scene of bloodstains and tears and desperate searches. And for years since, the ground has been barren. There are few reminders of the community that once lived there and the 16 lives that were lost there in the Northridge earthquake. At the site where once stood the Northridge Meadows Apartments complex, which became a symbol of the Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1995 | TIM MAY
The San Fernando City Council has budgeted Federal Community Development Block Grant funds to be used for the rehabilitation of commercial buildings that were damaged by the Northridge earthquake. The funds will be distributed to qualified applicants on a first-come, first-served basis, City Administrator Mary Strenn said. About $208,500 has been made available for the program, and interest so far has been considerable, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando city officials have found that 53 structures need to be demolished, at a cost of about $47 million, because of unexpectedly heavy damage from aftershocks. The updated assessment, which more than doubles earlier loss estimates, includes 30 businesses, or about 4% of those in the city, and 87 residential units, about 1% of the total. "It's more than I had anticipated based on the initial assessments that were made," San Fernando Mayor Dan Acuna said Friday.
NEWS
December 6, 1994 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city school officials said Monday it will take workers until the fall of 1996 to make an estimated $100 million in repairs needed for schools damaged in the Northridge earthquake--a delay of nearly two years because of federal red tape and the widespread nature of the damage. Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. Sid Thompson had previously said repairs would be completed, or at least under way, by January, 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1994 | TIM MAY
In an attempt to recognize the hard work and good deeds of thousands of San Fernando Valley residents during and since the Jan. 17 Northridge earthquake, a group of residents has organized a day of celebration and ceremony honoring a vast cross-section of the community. Scheduled to take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 12 at the Balboa Recreation Center, "San Fernando Rebuilds" will include celebrity participation in softball, volleyball, basketball, raffles, picnics and door prizes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1994 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as government officials Monday increased the cost of the Northridge quake, and victims still grappled with federal aid problems, optimistic signs appeared indicating that the San Fernando Valley was slowly beginning to return to normal. The Los Angeles Police Department canceled full emergency mobilization, with its 12-hour workdays, and returned to eight-hour shifts. Detectives went back to the routine business of solving crimes Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As $40 million in new federal housing loans were announced Sunday to aid Northridge earthquake victims, scientists reported that Southern California is in a period of "low seismicity." The announcement of funds for 1,675 more loans to facilitate quake recovery in single family and multifamily homes came in a Los Angeles news conference by U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry Cisneros and Mayor Richard J. Riordan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1997
The nation last saw the area as a heap of wreckage, glass shards and splintered beams. At the site where the Northridge Meadows apartment complex once stood, a symbol of the Jan. 17, 1994, earthquake and its destruction, work on the new Parc Ridge apartment structure began Monday. Its builders say it will be a symbol of recovery as well as a memorial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1996 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pink impatiens are in bloom outside 4700 Natick Ave. The stucco looks neatly starched. An electric generator snores gently in the basement. For those blessings, once taken for granted, residents are breathing a Si of relief. Simon Greitzer is part Paul Bunyan and part Santa Claus to his peers in this building. Much more of a hero to them--and many public officials--than an Olympic athlete could ever be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1996 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As $40 million in new federal housing loans were announced Sunday to aid Northridge earthquake victims, scientists reported that Southern California is in a period of "low seismicity." The announcement of funds for 1,675 more loans to facilitate quake recovery in single family and multifamily homes came in a Los Angeles news conference by U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry Cisneros and Mayor Richard J. Riordan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new apartment complex may rise on the site of the Northridge Meadows building that pancaked in the 1994 quake, killing 16 residents in the largest concentration of deaths in the temblor. A Los Angeles City Council subcommittee has approved a request, asking for $5.7 million in financial support, from a developer who wants to build new housing on the site of the now-razed building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996
An apartment complex may rise on the site of the Northridge Meadows building that collapsed in the Northridge quake, killing 16 residents in the largest concentration of deaths in the temblor. A Los Angeles City Council subcommittee has approved a request for $5.7 million in financial support from a developer who wants to build housing on the site once occupied by the building, which was demolished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1995 | TIM MAY
The San Fernando City Council has budgeted Federal Community Development Block Grant funds to be used for the rehabilitation of commercial buildings that were damaged by the Northridge earthquake. The funds will be distributed to qualified applicants on a first-come, first-served basis, City Administrator Mary Strenn said. About $208,500 has been made available for the program, and interest so far has been considerable, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1994 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elected officials and community leaders will meet in Reseda on Friday to discuss ways to build a better San Fernando Valley in the wake of the Northridge earthquake. The "Valley Leadership Conference: Rebuilding the Valley" will include discussions on transportation, regional economic development, emergency preparedness and housing needs. The conference will be held at Reseda High School's Regent Hall from 8:30 to 5:15 p.m. and is open to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1994 | JILL BETTNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Give tax credits to people who telecommute. Forget aerospace and help other San Fernando Valley industries that are adding jobs to grow. Expand bus service. Expand Metrolink. Those were some of the ideas for reshaping the Valley for the future that emerged Friday at a daylong conference of state representatives and community leaders in Reseda.
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minority business aided by a federally funded program have received more than $1 billion dollars in earthquake-related work in the 18 months since the Northridge temblor struck, city officials said Monday. The $1.1 billion translates to the creation of about 21,000 jobs and is nearly triple the goal set by the public-private partnership program, according to officials at the city's Office of Economic Development. "From a 6.8-magnitude tragedy comes a $1.
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is bad, but at least it will kick-start the economy, people told each other after the Northridge quake. Eighteen months later, you can still find people who think so, but they are a lucky, dwindling few. Scores of business owners made money off the quake initially, as people scurried to fix chimneys and stash belongings. But despite an influx of nearly $20 billion in quake-related aid, economists say there's been no boom for the many, just boomlets for the few.
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